Tag Archives: BAFTA

Nominations Announced for the EE BAFTA Film Awards 2023. Winners will be announced at the EE BAFTA Film Awards on Sunday February 19, 2023 at 7pm on BBC1 and iPlayer, and @BAFTA.

London, 19 January 2023, 12.20pm GMT –  BAFTA today announces the nominations for the 2023 EE BAFTA Film Awards, celebrating the very best in film over the past year. A total of 45 feature films received nominations today. View the full list of nominations HERE.

Highlights include:

  • 14 nominations for All Quiet on the Western Front
  • Ten nominations for The Banshees of Inisherin and Everything Everywhere All At Once
  • Nine nominations for Elvis
  • Five nominations for Tár
  • Four nominations for Aftersun; The Batman; Good Luck to You, Leo Grande; Top Gun: Maverick and The Whale
  • Three nominations for Babylon; Empire of Light; Guillermo del Toro’s Pinocchio; Living and Triangle of Sadness
  • Two nominations for Avatar: The Way of Water; Decision to Leave; The Quiet Girl; Roald Dahl’s Matilda The Musical; She Said and The Woman King
  • One nomination for each of the following: All That Breathes; All The Beauty and the Bloodshed; Amsterdam; Argentina, 1985; Black Panther: Wakanda Forever; Blonde; Blue Jean; Brian and Charles; Corsage; Electric Malady; The Fabelmans; Fire of Love; The Good Nurse; Marcel the Shell with Shoes On; Moonage Daydream; Mrs. Harris Goes to Paris; Navalny; Puss in Boots: The Last Wish; Rebellion; See How They Run; The Swimmers; Till; Turning Red and The Wonder
  • The following British shorts were nominated: The Boy, The Mole, The Fox, and The Horse; Middle Watch; Your Mountain Is Waiting; The Ballad of Olive Morris; Bazigaga; Bus Girl; A Drifting Up and An Irish Goodbye

Actors Hayley Atwell and Toheeb Jimoh announced the nominations via a live broadcast from BAFTA 195 Piccadilly in London.

First time nominees feature heavily this year, with 14 of the 24 nominees in the performance categories receiving their first BAFTA Film nomination. They include Ana De Armas (Blonde); Angela Bassett (Black Panther: Wakanda Forever) Austin Butler (Elvis), Colin Farrell (The Banshees of Inisherin); Brendan Fraser (The Whale); Paul Mescal (Aftersun), and Ke Huy Quan (Everything Everywhere All At Once).

Alongside this year’s EE Rising Star nominee Daryl McCormack, four former EE Rising Stars are nominated: Carey Mulligan (2010); Eddie Redmayne (2012); Barry Keoghan (2019) and Micheal Ward (2020).

In the Best Director category, four of the six are first time Director nominees: Gina Prince-Bythewood (The Woman King); Todd Field (Tár), Daniel Kwan and Daniel Scheinert (Everything Everywhere All At Once) and Edward Berger (All Quiet on the Western Front).

The film with most nominations, All Quiet on the Western Front (14) equals Crouching Tiger Hidden Dragon (2001) as the film not the English language with the most nominations in BAFTA’s history.

Jane Millichip, CEO of BAFTA, said: “The EE BAFTA Film Awards are a celebration of the full spectrum of craft and creativity that go into filmmaking. We extend our warmest congratulations to the 215 people nominated today who represent 45 extraordinary films, spanning a vast range of narrative styles, genres and perspectives. We are proud of the role our Awards play in inspiring the public and future filmmakers around the world, and we look forward to celebrating all the nominees and their films at the ceremony next month.”

Krishnendu Majumdar, Chair of BAFTA, said: “The EE BAFTA Film Awards are at the heart of our mission to recognise exceptional storytelling and the immensely talented people who bring those stories to the big screen, inspiring both audiences and future filmmakers alike. The range of films recognised by our 7500 voters, spanning blockbusters to independent debuts, offers a uniquely British perspective on this year’s best films from around the world. It is a huge achievement to reach this final stage – congratulations to today’s nominees.”

Anna Higgs, Chair of BAFTA Film Committee: “It is heartening to see that BAFTA’s ongoing work to level the playing field continues to have a positive impact on the diversity and scope of talent and titles nominated today. I’m delighted to see an all-women list in our Outstanding Debut category, as well as so many first-time nominees across the board. Today is about celebrating the phenomenal success of this year’s nominees, who together with their fellow filmmakers and crews, have created a truly remarkable year of films.”

The EE BAFTA Film Awards will take place on Sunday 19 February at the Southbank Centre’s Royal Festival Hall and will be broadcast in the UK from 19:00 – 21:00 on BBC1 and iPlayer, and syndicated globally. Award-winning actor, presenter and author Richard E. Grant will host the ceremony, with presenter Alison Hammond hosting a new BAFTA Studio – to give viewers at home an Access-All-Areas experience of one of the biggest nights in film. Film critic Ali Plumb and presenter Vick Hope will host the red carpet pre show on @BAFTA. For the first time, the ceremony will reveal the final four category winners live on the show, enabling audiences at home to be part of the excitement as it happens.

The nominees for the EE Rising Star Award were announced on 17 January as Aimee Lou Wood, Daryl McCormack, Emma Mackey, Naomi Ackie and Sheila Atim. It is the only award voted for by the British public and it is presented annually to a performer who has demonstrated exceptional talent early in their careers.  Voting is now open at ee.co.uk/bafta.

The final, third round of voting opens tomorrow (Friday, 20 January) to determine the winners. Round Three is voted for by the full film voting BAFTA membership, and its opt-in chapters or juries. More information can be found here on BAFTA’s voting processes.

Nominations are correct at the time of going to print. BAFTA reserves the right to make changes to the names listed at any time up until 19 February 2023.

 

About BAFTA

BAFTA – the British Academy of Film and Television Arts – is a world-leading independent arts charity that brings the very best work in film, games and television to public attention and supports the growth of creative talent in the UK and internationally. Through its Awards ceremonies and year-round programme of learning events and initiatives – which includes workshops, masterclasses, scholarships, lectures and mentoring schemes in the UK, USA and Asia – BAFTA identifies and celebrates excellence, discovers, inspires and nurtures new talent, and enables learning and creative collaboration. For more, visit www.bafta.org. BAFTA is a registered charity (no. 216726).

About EE

EE runs the UK’s biggest and fastest mobile network, offering superfast connections in more places than any other operator. EE brought the first 4G network to the UK in October 2012 and launched the UK’s first 5G network in May 2019.

EE has received extensive independent recognition, including being named the UK’s no.1 5G network by RootMetrics® in 2020 and being named the UK’s best network every year since 2014 for the following awards: The Mobile Choice Awards, The Mobile Industry Awards and by RootMetrics®.

As well as offering mobile services to consumers and small and medium businesses, EE also provides home and business broadband using both 4G and fixed line connections.

EE is committed to being number one for service in the industry and has nearly 600 shops across the UK. EE remains the only mobile provider to answer 100% of customer calls in the UK and Ireland and was recognised as the UK’s Best Large Contact Centre by the UK Customer Experience Awards 2018 and Welsh Contact Centre Awards 2019. EE was awarded The Sunday Times’ Best 100 Companies to Work for in 2018 and 2019, as well as being named Best Employer 2018 by the European Contact Centre & Customer Service awards.

EE is part of BT’s Consumer business unit which provides products and services to all of BT’s consumer customers in the UK. Follow us on:

Facebook at: www.facebook.com/ee

Twitter at: www.twitter.com/ee

YouTube at: www.youtube.com/ee

LinkedIn at: www.linkedin.com/company/ee-uk

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BAFTA, 195 Piccadilly, St. James’s, London W1J 9LN United Kingdom

Kate Hudson featured in BAFTA’s A Life in Pictures retrospective Q&A series, supported by TCL.

BAFTA: A LIFE IN PICTURES: KATE HUDSON

LONDON – Friday 16 November: This evening, BAFTA hosted a career retrospective with iconic Hollywood actress and entrepreneur Kate Hudson. In an in-depth discussion with Briony Hanson, Director of Film at the British Council, Kate Hudson reflected on her varied, award-winning filmography, including her most recent film, Glass Onion: A Knives Out Mystery, directed by Rian Johnson.

Six of Hudson’s films were highlighted during the event, including Almost Famous (2000), How to Lose a Guy in 10 Days (2003), Bride Wars (2009), Nine (2009), Mona Lisa and the Blood Moon (2021) and Glass Onion: A Knives Out Mystery (2022).

BAFTA: A Life in Pictures, supported by TCL, is a long-running series of in-depth interviews in which some of the world’s leading film and television talent share unique career insights into the experiences that helped them hone and develop their craft.

The series has previously hosted figures including Margot Robbie, Baz Luhrmann, Daniel Craig, George Clooney, Cate Blanchett, Viola Davis, Chiwetel Ejiofor, Tom Hanks, Hugh Grant, Keira Knightley Sam Mendes, Helen Mirren, Quentin Tarantino, Meryl Streep, Martin Scorsese, Kristin Scott Thomas, Emma Thompson and Kate Winslet.

BAFTA: A Life in Pictures is part of BAFTA’s year-round free online events series featuring BAFTA-winning and nominated shows and talent, for everyone from those working in the industry, to those curious to learn more about the making of their favourite films, games and television shows.  

About BAFTA

BAFTA – the British Academy of Film and Television Arts – is a world-leading independent arts charity that brings the very best work in film, games and television to public attention and supports the growth of creative talent in the UK and internationally. Through its Awards ceremonies and year-round programme of learning events and initiatives – which includes workshops, masterclasses, scholarships, lectures and mentoring schemes in the UK, USA and Asia – BAFTA identifies and celebrates excellence, discovers, inspires and nurtures new talent, and enables learning and creative collaboration. For more, visit www.bafta.org. BAFTA is a registered charity (no. 216726).

About TCL

TCL is one of the world’s fastest-growing consumer electronics companies and one of the leading television and mobile device manufacturers. For over 40 years TCL has operated its own manufacturing and research and development centres worldwide, with products sold in more than 160 countries throughout Europe, North America, Latin America, the Middle East, Africa and Asia Pacific. TCL specializes in the research, development and manufacturing of consumer electronics ranging from mobile phones, TVs, audio devices and smart home products, all part of the TCL ecosystem. For more information on TCL mobile devices, please visit:  https://www.tcl.com

TCL is a registered trademark of TCL Corporation. All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners. Follow TCL on Facebook @TCLMobileUK or on Instagram @tclmobile_uk

BAFTA, BFI NETWORK and British Council publish industry-first Short Film digital toolkit for aspiring talent.

Wednesday 7 December: Today, BAFTA, BFI NETWORK (awarding National Lottery funding) and the British Council unveil a new comprehensive free-to-access Short Film Toolkit, published today.

The first of its kind, this comprehensive digital guide includes insights from over 40 filmmakers, funders, festival programmers and distributors, unlocking vital insights and advice for aspiring talent to help them get the most out of their short film journey and accelerate their careers. 

Over half of filmmakers are thought to enter the industry via shorts, yet some – without established industry connections – can find the routes in challenging to navigate. Spanning film festival strategies, case studies, to funding and marketing recommendations, the Short Film digital toolkit unpacks the boundless world of shorts.

It illustrates that there is no one size fits all approach, alongside the importance of networks, where to access funding and what areas of promotion to invest in, key film festivals, alongside building relationships with peers and creative authenticity. Case studies span documentary, animation, fiction, experimental & artist moving image, XR and immersive, and includes videos which are all closed captioned with accompanying BSL interpretation, as well as written summaries of each of the recorded conversations.

The Short Film Toolkit can be found here.

Tim Hunter, Executive Director of Talent, Inclusion, Learning and Membership, said: “Short video content is now arguably the dominant art form of our time. For aspiring filmmakers, it is an affordable and accessible way of testing your mettle, learning new skills and honing your creativity. Shorts are also an excellent route into the industry – but that path is hard to tread without deep insider knowledge and a healthy amount of luck. This resource is about shining a light on how to make your short work for you as a spring board to your future career, so that more short filmmakers can strategise for success and showcase their talent and capabilities to the world.”

BAFTA-nominated filmmaker and toolkit contributor, Sorcha Bacon said: “Navigating the short film process is always tricky, especially when starting out and often filmmakers don’t quite know where to look. Having been fortunate enough to work with different financiers including the BFI Network, BBC Films and Film4 on my short films, I’m pleased to have been able to contribute to this fantastic resource which will help demystify the filmmaking process.”

Briony Hanson, Director of Film, British Council said: “We are hugely invested in short films as a place to nourish remarkable storytellers. Our short film Travel Grant programme (run in partnership with BFI NETWORK) already helps us to celebrate and champion the very best of UK creativity on an international stage – but it can be a daunting world to enter into. Now The Short Film Toolkit will offer invaluable insights from the beginning to end of the filmmaking process from filmmakers and film professionals who have already made the journey, and prove there’s no single right way to make and exhibit short films. We are grateful to everyone who has contributed to this resource (so far!) – many of whom are filmmakers who have received festival and lab grants from our programmes in the past. This is a vital resource for early career makers, and we look forward to more future filmmakers sharing their work with international audiences as a result.”

Alice Cabanas, Head of BFI NETWORK, said: “This resource benefits from the contributions of some fantastic creative talent and experienced industry execs to give aspiring filmmakers valuable and tangible guidance. Short films – from finding finance, getting them made, through to securing and maximising festival screenings – can be rich and fruitful training ground, but isn’t always easy to navigate. The Toolkit offers new talent insights on how short films can best help them to develop skills, hone their craft and build networks – the building blocks to successful careers in film.”

Today, millions of shorts are made every year by aspiring and established filmmakers and creatives around the world. The format may be used to showcase a feature film concept, or are often standalone pieces of art in their own right. BAFTA has officially recognised Shorts as an awards category since 1959. 

The Short Film Toolkit is an ever-growing resource and will be updated regularly.

About BAFTA

BAFTA – the British Academy of Film and Television Arts – is a world-leading independent arts charity that brings the very best work in film, games and television to public attention and supports the growth of creative talent in the UK and internationally. Through its Awards ceremonies and year-round programme of learning events and initiatives – which includes workshops, masterclasses, scholarships, lectures and mentoring schemes in the UK, USA and Asia – BAFTA identifies and celebrates excellence, discovers, inspires and nurtures new talent, and enables learning and creative collaboration. For more, visit www.bafta.org. BAFTA is a registered charity (no. 216726).

About BFI NETWORK

Made possible through National Lottery funding, BFI NETWORK exists to discover and support talented writers, directors and producers at the start of their careers. We collaborate with film organisations and leading cultural venues across the UK to provide funding for short films, support for the development of first features, as well as a range of professional and creative development programmes.

Find out more and watch supported work: https://network.bfi.org.uk/

@bfinetwork

About the BFI

We are a cultural charity, a National Lottery distributor, and the UK’s lead organisation for film and the moving image. Our mission is:

  • To support creativity and actively seek out the next generation of UK storytellers
  • To grow and care for the BFI National Archive, the world’s largest film and television archive
  • To offer the widest range of UK and international moving image culture through our programmes and festivals – delivered online and in venue
  • To use our knowledge to educate and deepen public appreciation and understanding
  • To work with Government and industry to ensure the continued growth of the UK’s screen industries

Founded in 1933, the BFI is a registered charity governed by Royal Charter.

The BFI Board of Governors is chaired by Tim Richards.

About British Council

The British Council is the UK’s international organisation for cultural relations and educational opportunities. We support peace and prosperity by building connections, understanding and trust between people in the UK and countries worldwide. We do this through our work in arts and culture, education and the English language. We work with people in over 200 countries and territories and are on the ground in more than 100 countries. In 2021-22 we reached 650 million people. www.britishcouncil.org   

BAFTA unveils new home of the EE BAFTA Film Awards: London’s iconic Royal Festival Hall as entries open for 2023.

The Southbank Centre’s Royal Festival Hall to host the world’s leading film talent on Sunday 19 February 2023. EE BAFTA Film Awards to be broadcast on BBC One and worldwide. Entries open today.

LONDON, 21 September: Today, BAFTA unveils London’s Royal Festival Hall as its new home for one of the biggest nights in the global film calendar. The EE BAFTA Film Awards brings British and international talent together to celebrate the incredible ingenuity and creativity of film, and the people who bring them to life on both sides of the screen. The move will see BAFTA programme its most ambitious and accessible night yet, bolstered by a refreshed production and format. With entries opening today, the countdown to 19 February 2023 officially begins.

The Southbank Centre’s monumental Royal Festival Hall, opened by King George VI and HRH Princess Elizabeth on 3 May 1951 is located in the heart of London on the River Thames. BAFTA’s legendary red carpet will roll out at the UK’s largest arts centre next to some of the capital’s most famous landmarks, from Big Ben and the Houses of Parliament to the National Theatre, BFI and the London Eye.  

The ceremony will be broadcast on BBC One, BBC One HD, BBCiPlayer, and syndicated globally. Red carpet interviews with nominees and guests will be streamed live across BAFTA and BBC’s social channels, offering audiences an exclusive front row seat as talent arrive. Further details including host for the 2023 Awards, will be announced at a later date.

Emma Baehr, Executive Director of Awards and Content, said: The EE BAFTA Film Awards are a global spotlight on the most exciting, innovative and creative stories being told in Britain and around the world, as well as playing host to the world’s biggest stars and a variety of unforgettable moments. The Royal Albert Hall has been a wonderful home to us for the last six years. As we embark on the next chapter in an incredibly exciting year for film, we can’t wait to kick off our new residency at the Royal Festival Hall with BAFTA’s most ambitious celebration yet.

Anna Higgs, Chair of BAFTA Film Committee, said: After months of painstaking preparations we are delighted to officially open entries for the 2023 EE BAFTA Film Awards. With the impressive calibre and creativity of films already on release, or on the way, our members in the UK and around the world have a phenomenal awards season ahead. Celebrating excellence, championing the value of the screen industries, and driving positive change through ensuring a level playing field continue to be at the heart of what BAFTA does – so we can’t wait to get going on voting and celebrating another fantastic year for film.”

Elaine Bedell, CEO of the Southbank Centre, said: “I’m delighted that this cements the partnership between BAFTA and the Southbank Centre, as we’re also home to BAFTA’s TV and Games Awards. BAFTA’s decision to bring three Awards ceremonies under one roof underscores the variety, scale and creative potential of our spaces to programme a spectacular evening, for everyone. We’re delighted to support the vitally important screen industries and are so excited to see the Southbank Centre transformed for one of the biggest nights in the global film calendar.”

Celebrating excellence, nurturing the next generation of talent and creating a level playing field in film, games and television is at the heart of BAFTA’s mission as an arts charity. Films in contention will be decided by BAFTA’s global membership, via a robust and carefully audited process that involves three rounds of voting, with nominations unveiled on 19 January 2023. Audiences at home will also be invited to vote on their favourite breakout talent, via the prestigious EE Rising Star Award.

The EE BAFTA Film Awards have been a core part of the charity’s mission to identify and celebrate creative excellence since its inception 75 years ago. Previous venues include the Royal Albert Hall, the Royal Opera House and the Odeon Cinema in Leicester Square, London. With a new CEO Jane Millichip starting next month, and a major redevelopment of BAFTA’s HQ completed earlier this year, 2022 marks an exciting year of transformation and renewal for the organisation.

About BAFTA

BAFTA – the British Academy of Film and Television Arts – is a world-leading independent arts charity that brings the very best work in film, games and television to public attention and supports the growth of creative talent in the UK and internationally. Through its Awards ceremonies and year-round programme of learning events and initiatives – which includes workshops, masterclasses, scholarships, lectures and mentoring schemes in the UK, USA and Asia – BAFTA identifies and celebrates excellence, discovers, inspires and nurtures new talent, and enables learning and creative collaboration. For more, visit www.bafta.org. BAFTA is a registered charity (no. 216726).

About EE

EE runs the UK’s biggest and fastest mobile network, offering superfast connections in more places than any other operator. EE brought the first 4G network to the UK in October 2012 and launched the UK’s first 5G network in May 2019.

EE has received extensive independent recognition, including being named the UK’s no.1 5G network by RootMetrics® in 2020 and being named the UK’s best network every year since 2014 for the following awards: The Mobile Choice Awards, The Mobile Industry Awards and by RootMetrics®.

As well as offering mobile services to consumers and small and medium businesses, EE also provides home and business broadband using both 4G and fixed line connections.

EE is committed to being number one for service in the industry and has nearly 600 shops across the UK. EE remains the only mobile provider to answer 100% of customer calls in the UK and Ireland and was recognised as the UK’s Best Large Contact Centre by the UK Customer Experience Awards 2018 and Welsh Contact Centre Awards 2019. EE was awarded The Sunday Times’ Best 100 Companies to Work for in 2018 and 2019, as well as being named Best Employer 2018 by the European Contact Centre & Customer Service awards.

EE is part of BT’s Consumer business unit which provides products and services to all of BT’s consumer customers in the UK. Follow us on:

Facebook at: www.facebook.com/ee

Twitter at: www.twitter.com/ee

YouTube at: www.youtube.com/ee

LinkedIn at: www.linkedin.com/company/ee-uk

About The Southbank Centre

The Southbank Centre is the UK’s largest arts centre occupying a prominent riverside location that sits in the midst of London’s most vibrant cultural quarter on the South Bank of the Thames. We exist to present great cultural experiences that bring people together and we achieve this by providing the space for artists to create and present their best work and by creating a place where as many people as possible can come together to experience bold, unusual and eye-opening work. We want to take people out of the everyday, every day. The site has an extraordinary creative and architectural history stretching back to the 1951 Festival of Britain. The Southbank Centre is made up of the Royal Festival Hall, Queen Elizabeth Hall, Purcell Room and Hayward Gallery as well as being home to the National Poetry Library and the Arts Council Collection. It is also home to six Resident Orchestras (Aurora Orchestra, Chineke! Orchestra, London Philharmonic Orchestra, London Sinfonietta, Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment and Philharmonia Orchestra). For more, visit www.southbankcentre.co.uk/

Emmy Rewind: Queen Elizabeth II & BAFTA

In honor of Queen Elizabeth II and her support of the arts and entertainment, revisit this 1992 emmy magazine article celebrating the British Academy of Film and Television Arts.

Los Angeles, Calif. – Queen Elizabeth II has been a familiar presence on television screens the world over. The UK’s longest-serving monarch, who died today, September 8, 2022, at the age of ninety-six, made hundreds of TV appearances over the course of her seventy-year reign — including her annual Christmas speech to the British Empire.

In 2016, she made her mark on American television when the Emmy Award-winning Netflix series The Crown premiered. The dramatic series aims to encompass her reign from young adulthood — when she was crowned at the age of twenty-five — to the present. As the character has aged, she has been portrayed by actresses Claire Foy, then by Olivia Colman — both of whom won Emmys for their work — and next by Imelda Staunton.

While it is unknown whether the royal family watches The Crown (though it is rumored they do), what is known is that the Queen made her love and appreciation of the arts official by bestowing appointments to the Order of the British Empire — including awards given to actors Judi Dench, Maggie Smith, Daniel Day-Lewis and Ian McKellen, to name but a few.
 
Queen Elizabeth II was also a financial supporter of the arts, and gifted the royalties from the famed British television documentary Royal Family — which aired on BBC 1 and ITV in June of 1969 — to the Society of Film and Television Arts (SFTA) — a forerunner of the British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA). The gift enabled the organization to move its offices to the former home of the Royal Society of Painters in Watercolours — a facility that was renovated to include two modern screening theaters, a members’ lounge and bar, a dining space and a conference suite.

The hope for the relationship between BAFTA and the Television Academy, as expressed in emmy magazine contributor Noble Wilson’s 1992 article, was to “establish a facility for visiting members, so that [Television Academy] members visiting London and BAFTA members traveling to Los Angeles could find a home away from home.”

A special relationship indeed.



Just 110 years ago, the Royal Institute of Painters in Watercolours opened its prestigious galleries on London’s Piccadilly. Today the “pictures” there are on film or tape, and the galleries have become the home of the British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA). Officially opened by Queen Elizabeth II in 1976, the facility now has two modern screening theaters, a members’ lounge and bar, as well as a very handsome dining and conference suite.

BAFTA is the amalgam of the former British Film Academy and the Guild of Television Producers and Directors. Its 2,200 members work in both the film and television industries, 400 of them as expatriate members in Los Angeles. While the interests of TV and film members have not always coincided, separate academies would find it very difficult to achieve the necessary support and funding; it is also quite evident that the two media are coming ever closer together, both in production and in the arrangements for distribution. Special effects, created electronically on videotape and then transferred to film, are being used by more and more filmmakers; while television programs are made on film, often for showing in movie theaters before airing on TV.

The academy has a royal president, Princess Anne, who takes much interest in its affairs. The vice-president is the celebrated producer-director Sir Richard Attenborough. There’s a council and a board of management, both working under the overall chairmanship of Richard Price, of one of the U.K.’s leading independent production and distribution houses and an old friend of the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences (ATAS) [now known as the Television Academy]. Day-to-day administration is in the hands of Tony Byrne, with his staff of forty.

What does BAFTA do? Well, its prime purpose, like that of ATAS, is the promotion of excellence, and many of its strategies in pursuit of that purpose are very similar to those of its American cousin: the giving of awards, training, mounting of special events and tributes, and screenings of its members’ work. Indeed the frequent showing of new feature films is one of the most popular activities.

The televised awards, of course, give BAFTA its highest public profile. The telecast of the production and performance awards from London’s Grosvenor House Hotel usually achieves an audience of more than 10 million (about a 40 rating) and has on occasion pulled in 13 million. BBC Television and one of the ITV companies, London Weekend (LWT), alternate in providing the coverage.

This year it was the turn of LWT, with the well-known talk-show host Michael Aspel, as master of ceremonies. Among the distinguished guests was ATAS executive director James L. Loper, who regularly takes advantage of this event to talk with some of the leading figures in British television. During the evening the PBS documentary series The Civil War, made by Ken Burns’s Florentine Films, was named best foreign program. Highlights also included the presentation of special awards to Audrey Hepburn and Sir John Gielgud.

A separate craft awards ceremony is usually held a week before the production awards in a venue outside London. This year it took place in Bristol, and the awards were given out in the presence of Prince Edward.

The system of nomination and voting for the production and performance awards is lengthy but comprehensive: All full members are invited to nominate programs screened during the preceding twelve months; the ten programs achieving the highest number of nominations, together with another five put forward by the program awards committee, are sent back to the members; members then choose four programs out of the fifteen; finally peer group juries vote for the winners from the four highest- scoring nominations.

The voting procedure for the craft awards is broadly similar.

Inevitably there have been criticisms of the system over the years, but so far no one has come up with anything that is thought to be fairer or more democratic. Edward Mirzoeff, BAFTA’s vice-chairman of television, likes to think that there could be a way of making absolutely sure that excellent programs that just aren’t seen by enough members, or that in the plethora of a year’s programming just get forgotten, can find their way into the final fifteen. Not an easy problem and one that must be only too familiar to award givers the world over.

In collaboration with Shell U.K., BAFTA has mounted a number of varied events and initiatives. There have been several tribute awards to famous British artists such as Julie Andrews, Sean Connery, and Michael Caine; it has produced study guides to promote the use of film in schools and an information packet on careers in film and television; it has supported Screenwriters’ Studio, the U.K.’s only master class for film and TV scriptwriting; it has sponsored a Fulbright fellowship in film and television studies and organized a nationwide rally of famous classic cars in aid of a charity; together with Central Television and the British Council it organized a festival of British film and television in Kiev, Ukraine, in 1990; and last year, at the invitation of the Library of Congress, BAFTA, and Central Television, with the help of many other British companies, mounted a similar festival in Washington, D.C., during the state visit of Queen Elizabeth II. And that’s just some of a long list of activities.

By now you will be wondering where the money comes from. There are a number of sources of funding. Over the last three years Shell U.K. has provided $5.25 million to help fund the special events of the kind mentioned above. It’s not known why the company decided not to maintain its support, or if it is, nobody’s telling. The official line is that the deal was for a maximum of three years. Others have suggested that a change of chairman at Shell or pressure from the parent company, Royal Dutch Shell in the Netherlands, may have been the reason. However BAFTA’s plans for special events in the coming year or two are not going to be spoiled; new corporate backing from a number of sources has been found, and the mood is one of optimism.

Individual full membership costs $166 a year; corporate membership runs $8,750, or $17,500 if you are a “foundation member.” Corporate members can entertain at BAFTA events, get reduced rates for using facilities at the BAFTA center, and thus have access to television and film personalities at the highest executive level. In February a British car manufacturer invited its clients to a champagne supper in the center, followed by the screening of a new film in the 200-seat theater.

What of the future? Chairman Richard Price says he is keen to see the promotion of excellence extended to include more categories of programming. At the moment the awards for production and performance are in the fields of drama, factual programs, light entertainment, comedy, news and remote broadcasts, music, and children’s and arts programs. Price hopes that recognition can be given to such programs as talk shows, sports, and daytime programming. He also feels that the skills and talents of those who make commercials should not be ignored. It’s not immediately clear how these ideas can be realized, but they will certainly have the backing of many people in the industry.

Price has already introduced a new source of funds: a lifetime member ship in BAFTA for a single payment of $1,925. At a stroke that brought in a bonus of $115,000!

And BAFTA recently introduced sep arate awards for programs made for Scottish and Welsh audiences. This year the ceremonies were held in Glasgow, Scotland, and Cardiff, Wales, and according to Price, who attended both events, many of the programs (which are normally not seen outside the respective national borders) were of high quality.

There’s no doubt that the relationship between BAFTA and ATAS is much appreciated: Both Richard Price and director Tony Byrne feel there is real benefit to be had in the mutual exchange of experience and in personal contact. On a practical level it’s hoped to establish a facility for visiting members, so that ATAS members visiting London and BAFTA members traveling to Los Angeles could find a home away from home.

I recently asked Tony Byrne what gave him the most job satisfaction over the last year. He said that despite months of hard-hitting recession, BAFTA has been able to stay on course and even pick up a little speed. An achievement indeed.


This article originally appeared in the May/June 1992 issue of emmy magazine under the title, “Europe Report: A British Salute to Excellence.”

A message from BAFTA regarding Her Majesty The Queen.

8 September 2022

A message regarding Her Majesty The Queen.

We are deeply saddened by the death of Her Majesty The Queen, whose close association with the Academy spanned 50 years. 

Through her various patronages, The Queen was renowned for her support of the UK’s creative industries, having been patron of the Royal Academy of Dramatic Arts, the Royal Variety Charity and the Cinema and Television Benevolent Fund.  Over the years, The Queen has visited countless film and television organisations, supporting their efforts by highlighting the work they do.   

In 1972, The Queen and HRH The Duke of Edinburgh generously gave their share of the profits from the documentary film Royal Family to the Society of Film and Television Arts (SFTA, a forerunner of BAFTA) as a donation towards a new headquarters for the Society.  The original idea to have a headquarters was conceived in early 1970 by Richard Cawston, a producer of Royal Family. 

The official opening of BAFTA’s new headquarters at 195 Piccadilly, in March 1976, was conducted by The Queen and attended by past Presidents of the organisation, HRH The Duke of Edinburgh, Earl Mountbatten of Burma, and HRH Princess Anne, who was President at the time.  On the occasion of the official opening, the Society of Film and Television Arts was renamed the British Academy of Film and Television Arts.  Five decades on, 195 Piccadilly remains BAFTA’s iconic London home and is at the heart of the Academy’s charitable activity. 

The Queen played a significant role in one of the most ambitious overseas initiatives the Academy has ever undertaken, when in 1990, the Library of Congress in Washington invited BAFTA to organise a joint Festival of British Film and Television.  The Academy organised a major British cultural programme in 1991 for the first state visit to Washington by The Queen and The Duke since 1976.  The Queen supported numerous events within the festival, including the Great British Picture Show at the Library of Congress, at which over 100 feature films were screened within a week.  The Queen also attended a BAFTA lunch at The Jefferson Building, together with The Duke, which included a presentation of a British Academy Special Award to actress Angela Lansbury by Sir Richard Attenborough. 

In 1996, when the Academy celebrated its 50th anniversary with a special event at 195 Piccadilly, The Queen and The Duke attended this milestone in the organisation’s history and to mark the occasion there were presentations of a Lifetime Achievement Award to cinematographer Freddie Young and the BAFTA Fellowship to Dame Maggie Smith.   

The Queen received her own BAFTA on 4 April 2013, the occasion of a reception for the British film industry hosted by Her Majesty at Windsor Castle.  An honorary British Academy Special Award was presented by Sir Kenneth Branagh in recognition of The Queen’s outstanding patronage of the film and television industries.   

The Queen occupies a unique place in the Academy’s history and will be missed enormously. 

Our thoughts are with our President, HRH The Duke of Cambridge and the Royal Family, to whom we offer our deepest sympathy.

Kevin Price 

Chief Executive Officer (Interim)

Krishnendu Majumdar 

Chair