Tag Archives: Academy Museum of Motion Pictures

ACADEMY MUSEUM OF MOTION PICTURES OPENS NEW STORIES OF CINEMA GALLERY ROTATIONS NEW GALLERIES INCLUDE IN-DEPTH LOOKS AT THE GODFATHER AND THE CAREER OF AGNÈS VARDA.

The Identity gallery at the Academy Museum will showcase original costumes such as David Bowie’s iconic Goblin King ensemble from Labyrinth (1986).

Los Angeles, CAToday, the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures opens its doors to thrilling new gallery and object rotations in its Stories of Cinema exhibition. Like cinema itself, the galleries of the museum’s core exhibition Stories of Cinema are designed to evolve and change over time to highlight different movies, artists, eras, genres, and more. Following are new rotations that will be presented in the 2022–2023 season in Stories of Cinema:

THE ART OF MOVIEMAKING: THE GODFATHER


The Art of Moviemaking: The Godfather showcases the collaborative process of the making of this masterpiece through a wide array of original objects, images, and stories. In 1972, director Francis Ford Coppola’s interpretation of Mario Puzo’s popular novel provided an operatic and poignant reflection on the American Dream that not only radically transformed the moviegoing experience, but also the moviemaking process. Featured costumes, props, scripts, and equipment will highlight the contributions of each cinematic branch, exploring how they innovated the changing landscape of Hollywood.

Object highlights include Don Corleone’s desk and chair used in The Godfather trilogy, Coppola’s original “Godfather notebook,” and a costume worn by Al Pacino in The Godfather Part II. This exhibition is curated by Assistant Curator Sophia Serrano with Curatorial Assistant Esme Douglas.

The Academy Museum Store will be releasing an exclusive collection of The Godfather merchandise in conjunction with the gallery. The products in this collection celebrate the Academy Award®-winning film’s 50th anniversary and are officially licensed by Paramount Pictures.

The products in this collection were created in conjunction with the museum’s gallery exhibition The Art of Moviemaking: The Godfather that celebrates the 50th anniversary of the Academy Award-winning film and are officially licensed by Paramount Pictures.

Starting Sunday, November 6, Fanny’s Restaurant will introduce a weekly “Sunday Supper” menu with dishes in conjunction with the The Art of Moviemaking: The Godfather . The family-style menu will include a weekly rotating selection of cheeky specials such as Connie’s Crispy Calamari, A Pasta You Can’t Refuse, Sunny’s “Bada-Bing!” Ribs, and more inspired plates, along with a selection of Italian wines and other cinema-inspired craft cocktails. Sunday dinner service will run from 5-9PM; reservations can be made via OpenTable and Resy, or by emailing info@fannysla.com.

DIRECTOR’S INSPIRATION: AGNÈS VARDA


This gallery is an exploration of one of global cinema’s most radical and transformative artists. Agnès Varda’s (1928-2019) work is undeniably personal drawing inspiration from her life, experiences, the people, and the world around her. Structured into three sections to reflect her life as a photographer, filmmaker, and fine artist, the gallery highlights influences and films from her seven-decade long career ranging from La Pointe Courte (1955), widely regarded as the first film of the French New Wave, to her autobiographical movie Varda by Agnès (2019). While the Photography section explores her time behind the still camera showcasing her Leica, as well as prints and contact sheets, the section focusing on her life as a filmmaker shows influences from her years living in Paris and Los Angeles including familial relationships, social rights movements, and other autobiographical elements that permeate all aspects of Varda’s filmography. At the heart of the gallery, a triptych montage invites visitors to immerse themselves in themes and motives from Varda’s vast cinematic oeuvre. Lastly, the Art section features works from Varda’s career as a fine artist including a model for one of her life-size cinema shack installations. One of Varda’s most important inspirations becomes palpable through the gallery’s design: her lifelong love for beaches. This gallery is curated by former Assistant Curator Ana Santiago and completed by Jessica Niebel, Exhibitions Curator with support from Manouchka Kelly Labouba, Research Assistant and the collaboration of Rosalie Varda-Demy, Mathieu Demy, and Ciné-Tamaris.

Shop the Academy Museum Store’s collection of Director’s Inspiration: Agnès Varda merchandise.

ADDITIONAL STORIES OF CINEMA ROTATIONS


IDENTITY
The Identity gallery will present a new lineup of original costumes, wigs, concept art, and other materials to explore the creation of characters through the art of hair, makeup, and costume design. Highlights include costumes worn by Elizabeth Taylor in A Place in the Sun (1951), designed by Edith Head; Julia Roberts in Mirror Mirror (2012), designed by Eiko Ishioka; David Bowie in Labyrinth (1986), designed by Brian Froud and Ellis Flyte; Richard Pryor in The Bingo Long Traveling All-Stars and Motor Kings (1973), designed by Bernard Johnson; and a headdress worn by Greta Garbo in Mata Hari  (1931), designed by Adrian.

The gallery also focuses on the work of key artists in these fields, such as the tattoo work of make-up artist Ken Diaz on movies such as Red Dragon (2002) and Black Panther (2018), wigs by hair stylist Yolanda Toussieng from Beetlejuice (1988) and Mrs. Doubtfire (1993), wigs and makeup by Nadia Stacey for The Favourite (2018), and costumes by designer Ann Roth from Mamma Mia! (2008) and Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom (2020).

OSCARS GALLERY AND ACADEMY AWARDS HISTORY


The Academy Awards History gallery now features Gregory Peck’s Oscar for To Kill a Mockingbird (1962), the Elie Saab gown worn by Halle Berry to the 74th Academy Awards in 2002, the tuxedo worn by Francis Ford Coppola to the 45th Academy Awards in 1973, and the Swarovski-studded vegan leather jacket worn by costume designer Jenny Beavan to the 88th Academy Awards in 2016.

STORY
The Story gallery explores how cinema is first born on paper, through scriptwriting and storyboarding. Case studies of Hitchcock’s Rebecca (1940) and The Birds (1963) explore two different approaches to adapting Daphne du Maurier. The Rebecca study looks at the role producer David O. Selznick played in bringing the film to the screen, as well as the importance of Kay Brown, Selznick’s Story Editor, and screenwriter Joan Harrison. The Birds installation focuses on Evan Hunter’s script and Harold Michelson’s storyboards of the now iconic sequence outside the schoolhouse.

Additional new objects from films spanning the silent era to the present day include script pages from Stella Dallas (1925), written by Frances Marion; scripts from Adam’s Rib (1949), written by Ruth Gordon and Garson Kanin; Albert Nozaki’s storyboards from The War of the Worlds (1953); a working notebook and script for Mosquita y Mari (2012), written and directed by Aurora Guerrero; and script notes and pages from Queen and Slim (2019), written by Lena Waithe.  

PERFORMANCE
The Performance gallery, which explores the disciplines of casting and acting, features new materials from the collections of Marion Dougherty and Lynn Stalmaster, two casting directors who revolutionized the craft post-studio system, as well as new Polaroids from the collection of casting director Johanna Ray, who has worked with many notable directors but is perhaps best known for her longtime collaboration with David Lynch.

Stories of Cinema is organized by Vice President of Curatorial Affairs Doris Berger, Senior Curator for Collections and Curatorial Affairs Nathalie Morris, Exhibitions Curators Jenny He and Jessica Niebel, Associate Curator Dara Jaffe, and Assistant Curators J. Raúl Guzmán, Dara Jaffe, and Sophia Serrano, former Assistant Curator Ana Santiago, with support from Curatorial Assistant Esme Douglas and Research Assistant Manouchka Kelly Labouba, the Academy Museum Inclusion Advisory Committee, and the Academy Branch Task Forces.

About the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures 
The Academy Museum is the largest museum in the United States devoted to the arts, sciences, and artists of moviemaking. The museum advances the understanding, celebration, and preservation of cinema through inclusive and accessible exhibitions, screenings, programs, initiatives, and collections. Designed by Pritzker Prize-winning architect Renzo Piano, the museum’s campus contains the restored and revitalized historic Saban Building—formerly known as the May Company building (1939)—and a soaring spherical addition. Together, these buildings contain 50,000 square feet of exhibition spaces, two state-of-the-art theaters, the Shirley Temple Education Studio, and beautiful public spaces that are free and open to the public. These include: The Walt Disney Company Piazza and the Sidney Poitier Grand Lobby, which houses the Spielberg Family Gallery, Academy Museum Store, and Fanny’s restaurant and café. The Academy Museum exhibition galleries are open seven days a week, with hours Sunday through Thursday from 10am to 6pm and Friday and Saturday from 10am to 8pm.

All images:
(left) The Art of Moviemaking: The GodfatherStories of Cinema 2, Academy Museum of Motion Pictures. Photo by Joshua White, JWPictures/©Academy Museum Foundation. (right) Director’s Inspiration : Agnès Varda, Stories of Cinema 2 , Academy Museum of Motion Pictures. Photo by Joshua White, JWPictures/©Academy Museum Foundation.
All b-roll footage: ©Academy Museum Foundation

MEDALISTS REVEALED AT 2022 STUDENT ACADEMY AWARDS® IN LOS ANGELES.

Student Academy Award Ceremony Held at Academy Museum, Hosted by Actor–Producer Terrence Jenkins.

LOS ANGELES, CA — The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences tonight honored its student winners from colleges and universities around the world at the 49th Student Academy Awards® ceremony.  The Gold, Silver and Bronze Medal awards were announced and presented during an in-person ceremony, a first since 2019, held at the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures’ David Geffen Theater in Los Angeles.  This year, the Student Academy Awards competition received a total of 1,796 entries from 614 colleges and universities around the world.  The 2022 winners join the ranks of such past Student Academy Award® winners as Patricia CardosoPete DocterSpike LeePatricia Riggen and Robert Zemeckis.  Hosted by Terrence Jenkins, the 2022 ceremony is available to view here.

The 2022 Student Academy Award medalists are:

Alternative/Experimental
Gold: “Against Reality,” Olivia Peace, University of Southern California

Animation
Gold: “An Ostrich Told Me the World Is Fake and I Think I Believe It,” Lachlan Pendragon, Griffith Film School, Australia

Silver: “Laika & Nemo,” Jan Gadermann and Sebastian Gadow, Konrad Wolf Film University of Babelsberg, Germany

Bronze: “The Seine’s Tears,” Yanis Belaid, Eliott Benard and Nicolas Mayeur, Pôle 3D Digital & Creative School, France

Documentary
Gold: “Found,” Shuhao Tse, New York University

Silver: “Here to Stay,” Jared Peraglia, New York University

Bronze: “Seasons,” Gabriella Canal and Michael Fearon, Columbia University

Narrative
Gold: “Almost Home,” Nils Keller, University of Television and Film Munich, Germany

Silver: “Rooms,” Welf Reinhart, University of Television and Film Munich, Germany

Bronze: “Shedding Angels,” Freddy Macdonald, American Film Institute

First-time honors go to Pôle 3D Digital & Creative School.

All Student Academy Award-winning films are eligible to compete for 2022 Oscars® in the Animated Short Film, Live Action Short Film or Documentary Short Film category.  Past winners have gone on to receive 65 Oscar® nominations and have won or shared 14 awards.

The Student Academy Awards were established in 1972 to provide a platform for emerging global talent by creating opportunities within the industry to showcase their work.

ABOUT THE ACADEMY
The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences is a global community of more than 10,000 of the most accomplished artists, filmmakers and executives working in film. In addition to celebrating and recognizing excellence in filmmaking through the Oscars, the Academy supports a wide range of initiatives to promote the arts and sciences of the movies, including public programming, screenings, publications, educational outreach, exhibitions, and more.

FOLLOW THE ACADEMY
www.oscars.org
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Julia Roberts honored with the Academy Museum’s Inaugural Icon Award for her decades-long career in cinema during the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures Second Annual Gala. The Star-Studded event raised $10 million.

Gala Honors Miky Lee, Sir Steve McQueen, Julia Roberts, and Tilda Swinton. With Featured Performance from Diana Ross, Gala was Co-Chaired by Halle Berry, Jason Blum, Ryan Murphy, and Lupita Nyong’o and Presented by Rolex.

LOS ANGELES, CA (October 15, 2022) – The Academy Museum of Motion Pictures, which held its second annual gala tonight, raised $10 million to support the museum’s access, education, and programming initiatives. Dedicated to the arts, sciences, and artists of moviemaking, the gala was generously presented by Rolex—founding supporter and official watch partner of the Academy Museum—and co-chaired by Academy AwardⓇ-winning actor and Academy Museum supporter Halle Berry, Academy Museum trustee and producer Jason Blum, Academy Museum trustee and screenwriter-director-producer Ryan Murphy, and Academy Award-winning actor Lupita Nyong’o. 

The celebratory evening was a star-studded affair that honored four Hollywood icons for their contributions to film both past and present. George Clooney presented Academy Award-winning actor Julia Roberts with the inaugural Academy Museum Gala Icon Award for her decades-long career in cinema and her significant global cultural impact.

The Visionary Award was presented to Academy Award-winning actor Tilda Swinton by longtime friend and collaborator Luca Guadagnino for her extensive body of work that has advanced the art of cinema. This year’s Vantage Award was presented by Daniel Kaluuya to Academy Award-winning director, producer, and writer Sir Steve McQueen for his work helping to contextualize and challenge dominant narratives around cinema.

The Icon, Visionary, and Vantage Awards, fabricated by UAP, are solid cast stainless steel statuettes inspired by historic versions of the OscarⓇ statuette; they are mirror polished by hand and attached to a cast bronze base with an engraved stainless steel nameplate affixed. Groundbreaking producer and Academy Museum trustee, Miky Lee received the Pillar Award from Jeffrey Katzenberg acknowledging her exemplary leadership and support for the international film community.

The Pillar Award, designed by the Haas Brothers and fabricated by UAP, is solid cast bronze, hand polished, hand stamped, and triple plated in nickel, copper, and 24k gold.

Now in its second year, the Academy Museum Gala is an annual celebration that reflects the museum’s mission to advance the understanding, celebration, and preservation of cinema and to expand knowledge and conversation about cinema as a global art form and cultural force.

The event was attended by some of Hollywood’s most prolific and notable actors, filmmakers, and industry executives as well as members of the event’s host committee who came together to support the museum. Guests included: Congressman Adam Schiff, Adrien Brody, Alan Bergman, Alana Haim, Alana and Steve Polacheck, Academy Museum trustee Alejandro Ramírez Magaña, Alexa Demie, Alexandra Daddario, Alicia Vikander, Allison Janney, Amal and George Clooney, Amber Valletta, Andrea Nevins, Academy Museum trustee Arnaud Boetsch, Ashton Sanders, Ava DuVernay, BJ Novak, Academy CEO Bill Kramer, Academy COO and Academy Museum General Counsel Brendan Connell, Jr., Brian Swardstrom, Brooklyn and Nicola Peltz Beckham, Bryan Lourd, Brynn Saban, Chloe Zhao, Christina Ricci, Chudney and Joshua Faulk, Cleo Wade, Colman Domingo, Daniel Kaluuya, Danny Elfman, Danny Ramirez, Academy Museum trustee David Dolby and Natasha Dolby, Derek Blasberg, Diana Silvers, Diego Boneta, Djuna Bel, Academy Museum trustee Dominic Ng, Donna Langley, Eddie Redmayne, Eiza González, Elvis Mitchell, Emma Stone, Academy Museum trustee Eric Esrailian, Este Haim, Evan Ellis Ross, Gia Coppola, Gina Prince-Bythewood, Glenn Close, Ha Jung-Woo, Hailey Bieber, Honor Titus, Academy Museum Director and President Jacqueline Stewart, Academy President Janet Yang, Academy Museum trustee Jason Blum and Lauren Schuker, Jay Ellis, Jeffrey and Marilyn Katzenberg, Jeremy Scott, Jeremy Strong, Jessica Chastain, Jim Gianopulos, Jodie Turner-Smith, Joe Jonas, John Cho, Jonathan Majors, Judd Apatow, Academy Museum trustee Julia Gouw, Juliana Margulies, Jung Woo-Sung, Jurnee Smollet, Kaia Gerber, Kaitlyn Dever, Academy Museum trustee Katherine Oliver, Ke Huy Quan, Keke Palmer, Kelly Sawyer Patricoff, Kerry Washington, Kevin Huvane, Academy Museum trustee Kimberly Steward, Laura Dern, Laura Harrier, Lee Byung-hun, Leslie Mann, Lena Dunham, Lily Collins, Lous and the Yazuka, Luca Guadagnino, Mark Bradford, Max Minghella, Mia Goth, Michelle Yeoh, Mindy Kaling, Naomi Scott, Natasha Lyonne, Ness Saban, Nicholas Ghesquiere, Nikolai Haas, Olivia Wilde, Park Chan-wook, Precious Lee, Raja Rajamannar, Rebel Wilson, Regina Hall, Ron Howard, Academy Museum trustee Ryan Murphy, Selena Gomez, Selma Blair,  Sophie Turner, Spike and Tonya Lewis Lee, Stephanie Hsu, Stephen Galloway, Sterling K. Brown, Taylor Russell, Thuso Mbedu, Van Jones, Vanessa Burghardt, Whitney Peak, Yoon Jong-bin, and Youn Yuh-Jung. 

Following a cocktail hour in Fanny’s Restaurant, the RAISE choir lead guests to a Wolfgang puck-inspired dinner on the Dolby Family Terrace. In a room inspired by the Hollywood landmark restaurant, Perino’s, guests were treated to a special musical performance by the iconic Diana Ross.

Event production and design were overseen by Gala Creative Director Lisa Love, Artistic Director Raúl Àvila, with musical direction by Keith Baptista, choreography by Jen Green, and costume direction by Jacqui Getty. 


ABOUT ROLEX AND CINEMA
For many decades, Rolex has maintained close ties with the world of cinema. Its watches have played a role in numerous films, including Oscar-winning masterpieces. The company promotes excellence, encourages the preservation and transmission of the cinematic arts, and celebrates progress by accompanying cinema legends and budding talents: through its Testimonees such as Martin Scorsese and James Cameron, its partnership with the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, and the Rolex Mentor and Protégé Arts Initiative with its mentorships for talented young filmmakers. Rolex has partnered with the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences since 2017, serving as Proud Sponsor of the Oscars , hosting the event’s Greenroom, while also supporting the Governors Awards, recognizing lifetime achievement in film and is the exclusive watch of the Academy. To assist in the preservation of film history for future generations, Rolex became a Founding Supporter of the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures in Los Angeles. Through its support of the film industry, Rolex champions excellence, the perpetuation of knowledge, the conservation of the art of filmmaking, and the rise of new talent.

About the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures 
The Academy Museum is the largest museum in the United States devoted to the arts, sciences, and artists of moviemaking. The museum advances the understanding, celebration, and preservation of cinema through inclusive and accessible exhibitions, screenings, programs, initiatives, and collections. Designed by Pritzker Prize-winning architect Renzo Piano, the museum’s campus contains the restored and revitalized historic Saban Building—formerly known as the May Company building (1939)—and a soaring spherical addition. Together, these buildings contain 50,000 square feet of exhibition spaces, two state-of-the-art theaters, the Shirley Temple Education Studio, and beautiful public spaces that are free and open to the public. These include: The Walt Disney Company Piazza and the Sidney Poitier Grand Lobby, which houses the Spielberg Family Gallery, Academy Museum Store, and Fanny’s Restaurant and Café. The Academy Museum exhibition galleries are open seven days a week, with hours Sunday through Thursday from 10am to 6pm and Friday and Saturday from 10am to 8pm. 

49TH STUDENT ACADEMY AWARDS® CEREMONY TO BE HELD THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20th AT THE ACADEMY MUSEUM OF MOTION PICTURE ARTS AND SCIENCES.

LOS ANGELES – The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences voted 14 students as winners of the 49th Student Academy Awards® competition. This year, the Student Academy Awards competition received a total of 1,796 entries from 614 colleges and universities around the world. For the first time since 2019, students will participate in an in-person award ceremony. The medal placements – gold, silver and bronze – in the four award categories will be announced at the ceremony. 

All Student Academy Award-winning films are eligible to compete for 2022 Oscars® in the Animated Short Film, Live Action Short Film or Documentary Short Film category.

Hosted by actor, host, producer Terrence Jenkins.

FINAL DAYS TO VIEW THE WIZARD OF OZ AND SPIKE LEE GALLERIES AT THE ACADEMY MUSEUM.

Last Week to See Iconic Ruby Slippers as Part of The Art of Moviemaking: The Wizard of Oz and Dozens of Items from Spike Lee’s Personal Collection in Director’s Inspiration: Spike Lee Installations Close Sep. 25. THE ART OF MOVIEMAKING: THE GODFATHER and DIRECTOR’S INSPIRATION: AGNÈS VARDA Open Nov. 3.

LOS ANGELES – The Art of Moviemaking: The Wizard of Oz and Director’s Inspiration: Spike Lee, both part of the Academy Museum of Motion Picture’s acclaimed Stories of Cinema exhibition, will close on September 25, 2022. Both galleries have been on view since the museum opened nearly a year ago on September 30, 2021.

With a pair of original ruby slippers, the iconic blue gingham pinafore worn by Judy Garland, as well as the sepia pinafore worn by Garland’s stand-in in the 1939 film. The Art of Moviemaking: The Wizard of Oz takes visitors behind-the-scenes to explore the many disciplines that come together to bring a single film to life—screenwriting, casting, makeup design, costume design, production design, sound design, special effects, acting, directing, producing, and more. 

Original posters, script drafts, drawings, production photography, the Cowardly Lion’s mane and the Wicked Witch of the West’s hat all come together to showcase a film that changed moviemaking forever.

Director’s Inspiration: Spike Lee draws from the Academy Award®-winning director’s personal collection of objects, such as a guitar owned by Prince (with whom he collaborated) and the custom purple Gucci suit Lee wore to the 2020 Oscars® to pay tribute to Lakers star player Kobe Bryant (whom he chronicled in the 2009 documentary Kobe Doin’ Work).

Informed by Spike Lee’s own account of the creative process, the gallery considers his body of work and the inspiration behind some of his most iconic titles such as Do the Right Thing (1989) and Crooklyn (1994) as well as recurring themes and collaborators.

The respective galleries will be transformed for The Art of Moviemaking: The Godfather and Director’s Inspiration: Agnès Varda, each opening November 3. 

The Art of Moviemaking: The Godfather, will showcase the collaborative process of the making of this masterpiece through a wide array of original objects, images, and stories. In 1972, director Francis Ford Coppola’s interpretation of Mario Puzo’s popular novel provided an operatic and poignant reflection on the American Dream that not only radically transformed the moviegoing experience, but also the moviemaking process. Featured costumes, props, scripts, and equipment will highlight the contributions of each cinematic branch, exploring how they innovated amidst the limitations and freedoms of “New Hollywood.” 

Object highlights include Don Corleone’s desk and chair used in The Godfather trilogy, Coppola’s original “Godfather notebook,” and a costume worn by Al Pacino in The Godfather Part II. This exhibition is organized by Assistant Curator Sophia Serrano. Leading up to The Godfather gallery rotation, the Academy Museum Store will be releasing an exclusive limited-edition The Godfather LP in partnership with Amoeba Music. The album will feature music from The City of Prague Philharmonic Orchestra and will include music from the trilogy. Pre-order your copy today at academymuseumstore.org.

Also opening is Director’s Inspiration: Agnès Varda, an exploration of one of global cinema’s most radical and transformative artists. Belgian-born Varda’s work is undeniably personal drawing inspiration from her life, experiences, the people and the world around her. This gallery will highlight her influences and films from her six-decade long career ranging from La Pointe Courte (1955), widely regarded as the first film of the French New Wave, to her autobiographical Varda by Agnès (2019). A photographer prior to becoming a filmmaker, the gallery will explore Varda’s time behind the still camera including prints, contact sheets, and photography related production materials.

From her years living in Los Angeles to her familial relationships, the autobiographical elements that permeate all aspects of Varda’s filmography will be represented using personal postcards, props, family photographs, and other production materials. Additionally, Varda’s career as a fine artist and her longstanding love of art history which influenced many of her films will be explored using production notebooks, posters, and a model for one of her cinema shack installations. This gallery is curated by former Assistant Curator Ana Santiago and completed by Jessica Niebel, Exhibitions Curator with support from Manouchka Kelly Labouba, Research Assistant and the collaboration of Rosalie Varda-Demy, Mathieu Demy and Ciné-Tamaris.

Stories of Cinema is organized by Vice President of Curatorial Affairs Doris Berger, Senior Curator for Collections and Curatorial Affairs Nathalie Morris, Exhibitions Curators Jenny He and Jessica Niebel, Associate Curator Dara Jaffe, and Assistant Curators J. Raúl Guzmán, Dara Jaffe, Ana Santiago, and Sophia Serrano, with support from Curatorial Assistant Esme Douglas and Research Assistant Manouchka Kelly Labouba, the Academy Museum Inclusion Advisory Committee, and the Academy Branch Task Forces.

WHEN
The Art of Moviemaking: The Wizard of Oz and Director’s Inspiration: Spike Lee close Sunday, Sep. 25.

The Art of Moviemaking: The Godfather and Director’s Inspiration: Agnes Varda, Open Nov. 3.

The Academy Museum exhibition galleries are open seven days a week, with hours Sunday through Thursday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Friday and Saturday from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.

ADMISSION/ TICKETS
Tickets to the Academy Museum are available only through advance online reservations via the Academy Museum’s website and mobile app. 

General admission tickets for the museum’s exhibitions are $25 for adults, $19 for seniors (age 62+), and $15 for students. Admission for visitors ages 17 and younger, and for California residents with an EBT, card is free. 

Film screening tickets are $10 for adults, $7 for seniors (age 62+), and $5 for students and children (age 17-). Matinees are $5 for all.


About the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures 
The Academy Museum is the largest museum in the United States devoted to the arts, sciences, and artists of moviemaking. The museum advances the understanding, celebration, and preservation of cinema through inclusive and accessible exhibitions, screenings, programs, initiatives, and collections. Designed by Pritzker Prize-winning architect Renzo Piano, the museum’s campus contains the restored and revitalized historic Saban Building—formerly known as the May Company building (1939)—and a soaring spherical addition. Together, these buildings contain 50,000 square feet of exhibition spaces, two state-of-the-art theaters, the Shirley Temple Education Studio, and beautiful public spaces that are free and open to the public. These include: The Walt Disney Company Piazza and the Sidney Poitier Grand Lobby, which houses the Spielberg Family Gallery, Academy Museum Store, and Fanny’s restaurant and café.

LUMINARIES GATHER FOR AN EVENING WITH SACHEEN LITTLEFEATHER AT THE ACADEMY OF MOTION PICTURE MUSEUM.  LITTLEFEATHER’S FOUR-HOUR VISUAL HISTORY NOW AVAILABLE ON THE MUSEUM’S YOUTUBE CHANNEL.

Los Angeles, Calif. – On September 17, 2022, luminaries from the Native American, Indigenous, and entertainment communities came together at the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures in Los Angeles for An Evening with Sacheen Littlefeather—a public program focused on celebration, healing, and reflection. The event was followed by an intimate private reception. 

The museum livestreamed An Evening with Sacheen Littlefeather on its YouTube channel. The video will be available online until Friday, September 23; a trimmed version of the event will then be shared to the museum’s channel.

In addition, as part of the Academy’s Oral History Projects, the museum has published a nearly four-hour visual history with Littlefeather, interviewed by Academy Museum Director and President Jacqueline Stewart. The mission of the Academy Oral History Projects is to collect, record, preserve, and provide access to personal spoken accounts that provide insight into the history and evolution of the art, science, and craft of motion pictures. The recording arm of the program—the Visual History Program—has been operating since 2012 and has so far filmed 234 filmmaker interviews (about 940 hours of original content) and preserved another 1,200 historical interviews from other sources.


The event commenced with a Tongva land acknowledgement facilitated by Virginia Carmelo (Tongva/S. CA) before emcees Earl Neconie (Kiowa/OK) and Academy Museum Director and President Jacqueline Stewart took the stage. Their words were followed by an Honoring Song performed by Steve Bohay and the Sooner Nation Singers and Michael Bellanger and the All Nation Singers. The audience was then treated to a lively intertribal powwow dance featuring women’s northern traditional buckskin dancer Teresa Littlebird (Northern Cheyenne/CA), grass dancer Wesley Bellanger (Ojibiway/MN and Kickapoo/OK), grass dancer Randy Pico Jr. (Navajo & Luiseño, CA), southern straight men’s traditional dancer James Gregory (Osage/OK), southern women’s cloth dancer Michele Gregory (Pit River/No. CA), fancy shoal dancer Olivia Gone (Southern Cheyenne/OK), jingledress dancer Sophia Seaboy (Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate Sisseton/SD), and chicken dancer Ahshkii Keediniihii (Diné Navajo/AZ), plus a moving rendition of Song in Lushootseed and Don’t Count Me Out by vocalist Calina Lawrence (Suquamish/WA).

Following these powerful performances, Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences CEO Bill Kramer took the stage to underscore the Academy and Academy Museum’s prioritization of representation, belonging, inclusion, and access. Visitors then watched a 60-second clip of Littlefeather’s speech from the 1973 Academy Awards® during which—at Marlon Brando’s request—she respectfully declined his Best Actor award in protest of the treatment of Native Americans in the entertainment industry. This clip is currently on view in the museum’s Academy Awards History gallery. 

Academy member, producer, and co-chair of the Academy’s Indigenous Alliance Bird Runningwater (Cheyenne/Mescalero Apache/NM) then took the stage with Sacheen Littlefeather (Apachi/Yaqui/AZ) for a 20-minute conversation that reflected on Littlefeather’s experiences the last fifty years.

Later in the evening, former Academy President David Rubin, with current Academy President Janet Yang, read the Academy’s apology letter—originally presented to Littlefeather on June 18, 2022—after which Littlefeather offered a moving response.

The White Mountain Apache Crown Dancers from Arizona with Joe Tohonnie got everyone on their feet with a dynamic dance to close out the program.

Immediately following the public program, the museum hosted a private reception for 300 guests in its Tea Room and Wilshire Terrace with food provided by guest chef Crystal Wahpepah (Kickapoo/OK), owner and operator of Wahpepah’s Kitchen in Oakland, CA. Wahpepah mindfully chooses Indigenous food sources for her cuisine, with ingredients originating from the people and lands to which she is connected and has a relationship.  In addition to Sacheen, the evening’s presenters and performers, and Academy and Academy Museum leadership, notable guests included: costume designer Ruth E. Carter, Oneida Nation Enterprises CEO and museum trustee Ray Halbritter (Oneida Indian Nation/NY), musical artist Taboo, actor Devery Jacobs, actor and filmmaker Riley Keough, actor Zahn McClarnon, and Academy member, producer, co-chair of the Academy’s Indigenous Alliance Heather Rae.   

About the Academy Museum
The Academy Museum is the largest museum in the United States devoted to the arts, sciences, and artists of moviemaking. The museum advances the understanding, celebration, and preservation of cinema through inclusive and accessible exhibitions, screenings, programs, initiatives, and collections. Designed by Pritzker Prize-winning architect Renzo Piano, the museum’s campus contains the restored and revitalized historic Saban Building—formerly known as the May Company building (1939)—and a soaring spherical addition. Together, these buildings contain 50,000 square feet of exhibition spaces, two state-of-the-art theaters, the Shirley Temple Education Studio, and beautiful public spaces that are free and open to the public. These include: The Walt Disney Company Piazza and the Sidney Poitier Grand Lobby, which houses the Spielberg Family Gallery, Academy Museum Store, and Fanny’s restaurant and café. The Academy Museum exhibition galleries are open seven days a week, with hours Sunday through Thursday from 10am to 6pm and Friday and Saturday from 10am to 8pm.

About the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences
The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences is a global community of more than 10,000 of the most accomplished artists, filmmakers, and executives working in film. In addition to celebrating and recognizing excellence in filmmaking through the Oscars®, the Academy supports a wide range of initiatives to promote the arts and sciences of the movies, including public programming, screenings, publications, educational outreach, exhibitions, and more.

ACADEMY MUSEUM WILL OFFER LIVESTREAM OF AN EVENING WITH SACHEEN LITTLEFEATHERON SEPTEMBER 17, 2022.

FOLLOWING THE PROGRAM, MUSEUM WILL PUBLISH 
LITTLEFEATHER’S FOUR-HOUR VISUAL HISTORY.

 

Los Angeles, Calif. – On September 17, 2022, the Academy Museum will host An Evening with Sacheen Littlefeather, a special program of conversation, healing, and celebration that will reflect on the historic 1973 Academy Awards® ceremony during which Sacheen Littlefeather (Apache/Yaqui/AZ) declined Marlon Brando’s Academy Award at his request.

The event, programmed by Littlefeather and produced by Academy Museum Vice President of Education and Public Engagement Amy Homma, is part of the museum’s ongoing dedication to create programs and exhibitions in partnership with film artists and communities that illuminate the entertainment industry’s past and pave the way for meaningful change in its future.

As An Evening with Sacheen Littlefeather is at capacity, the museum will livestream the program on its YouTube channel. The program will be available until Friday September 23. A standby line will also be available at the museum starting at 2pm PDT on Saturday, September 17.

In addition, the museum will publish a nearly four-hour visual history of Littlefeather, interviewed by Academy Museum Director and President Jacqueline Stewart, following An Evening with Sacheen Littlefeather at 7 pm PDT. Details will be shared following the event.

The evening’s program will include a land acknowledgement courtesy of Virginia Carmelo (Tongva/So. CA), a reading of the Academy’s letter of apology to Littlefeather, Native American performances, and a conversation between Littlefeather and Academy Member, producer, and co-chair of the Academy’s Indigenous Alliance Bird Runningwater (Cheyenne/Mescalero Apache/NM). Additional performers and speakers will include Academy CEO Bill Kramer, traditional vocalist and singer Calina Lawrence (Suquamish/WA), former Academy President David Rubin, incoming Academy President Janet Yang, emcee Earl Neconie (Kiowa/OK), emcee Jacqueline Stewart, Michael Bellanger (Ojibiway/MN & Kickapoo/OK) and the All Nation Singers and Dancers, and Steve Bohay (Kiowa/OK) and the Sooner Nation Singers and Dancers, and the White Mountain Apache Crown Dancers with Joe Tohonnie (Apache/AZ).

Academy Museum of Motion Pictures
6067 Wilshire Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90036

Saturday, September 17, 2022. 5 pm PDT.

ABOUT THE ACADEMY MUSEUM
The Academy Museum is the largest museum in the United States devoted to the arts, sciences, and artists of moviemaking. The museum advances the understanding, celebration, and preservation of cinema through inclusive and accessible exhibitions, screenings, programs, initiatives, and collections. Designed by Pritzker Prize-winning architect Renzo Piano, the museum’s campus contains the restored and revitalized historic Saban Building—formerly known as the May Company building (1939)—and a soaring spherical addition. Together, these buildings contain 50,000 square feet of exhibition spaces, two state-of-the-art theaters, the Shirley Temple Education Studio, and beautiful public spaces that are free and open to the public. These include: The Walt Disney Company Piazza and the Sidney Poitier Grand Lobby, which houses the Spielberg Family Gallery, Academy Museum Store, and Fanny’s restaurant and café. The Academy Museum exhibition galleries are open seven days a week, with hours Sunday through Thursday from 10am to 6pm and Friday and Saturday from 10am to 8pm. 

About the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures
The Academy Museum is the largest museum in the United States devoted to the arts, sciences, and artists of moviemaking. The museum advances the understanding, celebration, and preservation of cinema through inclusive and accessible exhibitions, screenings, programs, initiatives, and collections. Designed by Pritzker Prize-winning architect Renzo Piano, the museum’s campus contains the restored and revitalized historic Saban Building—formerly known as the May Company building (1939)—and a soaring spherical addition. Together, these buildings contain 50,000 square feet of exhibition spaces, two state-of-the-art theaters, the Shirley Temple Education Studio, and beautiful public spaces that are free and open to the public. These include: The Walt Disney Company Piazza and the Sidney Poitier Grand Lobby, which houses the Spielberg Family Gallery, Academy Museum Store, and Fanny’s restaurant and café. The Academy Museum exhibition galleries are open seven days a week, with hours Sunday through Thursday from 10am to 6pm and Friday and Saturday from 10am to 8pm.

About the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences
The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences is a global community of more than 10,000 of the most accomplished artists, filmmakers and executives working in film. In addition to celebrating and recognizing excellence in filmmaking through the Oscars, the Academy supports a wide range of initiatives to promote the arts and sciences of the movies, including public programming, screenings, publications, educational outreach, exhibitions, and more.

Regeneration: Black Cinema, 1898-1971 Opens to public on August 21, 2022 at the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures in Los Angels. Press preview, dignitaries, showcase history and achievements from the 1890s to the early 1970s.

Regeneration: An Introduction Film Series Begins on August 25 with Premiere of the Newly Restored Reform School (1939), a Film Once Thought Lost – Comprehensive Online Resource regenerationblackcinema.org Launches Today 

Los Angeles, Calif. (Aug. 17, 2022) —The Academy Museum of Motion Pictures debuts Regeneration: Black Cinema, 1898–1971 on August 21, 2022. The ambitious exhibition, on view through April 9, 2023, explores the achievements and challenges of Black filmmakers in the US in both independent production and the studio system—in front of the camera and behind it—from cinema’s infancy in the 1890s to the early 1970s.

Manouchka Labouba – Research assistant, Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences, Shraddha Aryal – SVP, Exhibition Design and Production, Academy Of Motion Pictures Museum, Bill Kramer – Chief Executive Officer at Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences, Charles Burnett – Filmmaker, Academy member, Regeneration Advisory Panel, Doris Berger – Vice President of Curatorial Affairs Academy Museum of Motion Pictures, Rhea Combs – Director of Curatorial Affairs at Smithsonian’s National Portrait Gallery, Isaac Julien – Installation artist, filmmaker, professor, Jacqueline Stewart – Director and President of the Academy Museum, Ava DuVernay – Filmmaker and Academy Governor, Regeneration Advisory Panel, J Raúl Guzmán – Assistant curator Academy Museum of Motion Pictures, Brendan Connell, Jr. – COO and General Counsel at Academy Museum of Motion Pictures at the opening press preview for Regeneration: Black Cinema 1898-1971 at the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures.


The Academy Museum’s second exhibition in the 11,000-square-foot Marilyn and Jeffrey Katzenberg Gallery, Regeneration includes rarely seen excerpts of films, documentaries, newsreels, and home movies, as well as historical photographs, costumes, props, and posters. Regeneration will also feature contemporary artworks referencing the impact of the legacy of Black filmmaking and AR elements designed for the exhibition. The exhibition will be accompanied by a range of film screenings, including world premieres of films newly restored by the Academy Film Archive, an interactive microsite with supplemental content, a robust curriculum to engage high school students and teachers, and a fully illustrated catalogue featuring the writing of leading filmmakers, scholars and the co-curators. 


The exhibition is co-curated by Doris Berger, Vice President of Curatorial Affairs at the Academy Museum, and Rhea L. Combs, Director of Curatorial Affairs at the Smithsonian’s National Portrait Gallery, with the Academy Museum’s J. Raúl Guzmán, Assistant Curator, as well as Manouchka Kelly Labouba and Emily Rauber Rodriguez, Research Assistants. Multiple film series are organized by Bernardo Rondeau, Senior Director of Film Programs for the Academy Museum, and a future exhibition film series will be guest-programmed by Black Film Archive creator and curator Maya Cade.

“This landmark exhibition seeks to restore lost chapters of American film history as it elevates the contributions of Black artists to present a more inclusive story,” said the Academy Museum’s recently appointed Director and President Jacqueline Stewart. “We are incredibly proud to present Regeneration, an exhibition that demonstrates how the Academy Museum shares new scholarship, offers a more expansive vision of American film history, and encourages public dialogue about the past and present of film as an art form and a social force.”

Co-curators Berger and Combs said, “It has been a great honor for us to curate Regeneration, a project that challenged us to do justice to the lives and work of nearly a century of Black filmmakers and the audiences they served. The legacies explored in these galleries were important in their own time, though too often neglected and marginalized, they remain vital today. We hope to heighten awareness of these films and film artists and encourage an appreciation of the many, many contributions that African Americans have made to cinema.”

EXHIBITION ORGANIZATION AND HIGHLIGHTS
Regeneration comprises seven galleries dedicated to exploring the social and political situation of Black Americans at the dawn of filmmaking; the presence and images of Black people in early cinema beginning in 1898; pioneering independent Black filmmakers such as Oscar Micheaux and so-called “race films” from the 1910s to the 1940s; Black music in American film, including “soundies” and Black musicals of the 1920s and 1940s; Black stars and film icons from the 1920s through the 1950s; and freedom movements in the 1950s and 1960s. The concluding gallery in Regeneration pays tribute to five Black directors active from the 1960s onward: Melvin Van Peebles, Gordon Parks, William Greaves, Madeline Anderson, and Robert L. Goodwin.

The exhibition opens with two versions of a clip from Something Good – Negro Kiss (1898), showcasing vaudeville performers Saint Suttle (1870–1932) and Gertie Brown (1882–1934) in what appears to be one of the earliest examples of an on-screen performance of affection by Black actors. This silent work counters the popular stereotypical and racist caricatures of Black performance at the time. Additional highlights on view include never-before-shown costume drawings from Carmen Jones (1954); glamour portraits of leading Black film stars; costumes worn by Lena Horne in Stormy Weather (1943), and Sammy Davis Jr. in Porgy and Bess (1959); a 1920s camera from the Norman Film Company, a producer of race films; a 1940s Mills Panoram machine, on which visitors to the exhibition can watch “soundies;” and one of Louis Armstrong’s trumpets.

Throughout the exhibition, to address the continuing impact of the legacy of Black filmmaking and its interplay with other traditions in visual art, the exhibition also includes works by contemporary artists including Theaster Gates (Some Remember Sock HopsOthers Remember Riots, 2020), Glenn Ligon (Double America 2, 2014), Gary Simmons (Balcony Seating Only, 2017), and Kara Walker (The End of Uncle Tom and the Grand Allegorical Tableau of Eva in Heaven, 1995).

Presented in conjunction with Regeneration is Isaac Julien’s Baltimore, a three-channel installation from 2003 that is located in the Academy Museum’s Warner Bros. Gallery. Julien’s film is an homage to writer, director, producer, and actor Melvin Van Peebles (1932–2021), whose 1971 film Sweet Sweetback’s Baadasssss Song ushered in the “blaxploitation” era, a genre of low-budget films created for African American audiences during the 1970s. Artist Isaac Julien appropriates the look and feel of blaxploitation films, using Baltimore’s streets and museums as locations. Julian created this piece while filming Baadasssss Cinema (2002), a documentary on blaxploitation. Julien is a world-renowned British installation artist, filmmaker, and distinguished professor of the arts at the University of California, Santa Cruz.

ADVISORY COMMITTEE AND EXHIBITION SUPPORT
Throughout the development of the exhibition, co-curators Berger and Combs collaborated with an advisory group of distinguished scholars, curators, and filmmakers, including: Charles Burnett, filmmaker, Academy member; Ava DuVernay, filmmaker, Academy Governor; Michael Boyce Gillespie, Associate Professor, The City College of New York, Department of Media and Communication Arts; Shola Lynch, Curator, New York Public Library, Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, filmmaker, Academy member; Ron Magliozzi, Curator of Film, The Museum of Modern Art; Ellen C. Scott, Associate Professor and Associate Dean of Equity, Diversity and Inclusion at UCLA School of Theater, Film and Television; and Jacqueline Stewart.

FILM PROGRAMS
The Academy Museum of Motion Pictures will screen a survey of the films and filmmakers explored in Regeneration. The first film series to accompany the exhibition—Regeneration: An Introduction—will kick off on August 25 with the world-premiere of a new restoration by the Academy Film Archive of the “lost” film Reform School (1939) starring Louise Beavers. This series runs until September 29 and will feature more than twenty screenings.

Covering the same 70+ year span as the exhibition, from cinema’s infancy in the 1890s to the early 1970s, the film series ranges from showcasing silent era pioneers such as writer-producer-director Oscar Micheaux’s dramas to the groundbreaking allegories of Spencer Williams and the independently produced, genre-defying works of innovators such as Melvin Van Peebles. Audiences will also be introduced to stars largely unknown to mainstream moviegoers—Ralph Cooper, Clarence Brooks, and Francine Everett—alongside iconic screen legends Paul Robeson, Josephine Baker, Harry Belafonte, Sidney Poitier, Lena Horne, and more. 

In addition to the inaugural film series, the museum will launch additional film programming and screenings around Regeneration in late 2022 and early 2023 including world premieres of films newly restored by the Academy Film Archive—Harlem on the Prairie (1937) and Mr. Washington Goes to Town (1942); a centennial celebration of Dorothy Dandridge and Ruby Dee; screenings of silent films with live musical accompaniment; and a screening series by guest programmer Maya Cade to debut in February 2023. 

EDUCATION PROGRAMS
The Regeneration Summit, February 3–5, 2023, will be a two-day celebration of Black cinema featuring artists, scholars, and filmmakers participating in conversations, workshops, and activations throughout the museum. Centered on the question “What does Black Cinema mean to you?” we invite our public to experience the groundbreaking exhibition Regeneration: Black Cinema 1898–1971 and celebrate the accomplishments of Black film artists past and present. More details and special guests will be announced at a later date.

THE REGENERATION CURRICULUM
The Regeneration curriculum guide invites teachers and high school students to engage in the celebration of Black cinema while examining and expanding their own understanding of histories, and the importance of telling more inclusive stories. Created in modular parts drawing both from the exhibition and scholarship in the catalogue, teachers will be introduced to the education department’s pedagogical approach to inquiry-centered learning. The guide includes select biographies of influential thinkers and filmmakers, detailed explorations of the contemporary artworks included in the exhibition, unique film companions detailing the significant contributions and impact of Black filmmakers, and more. 

Education programs are led by Vice President of Education and Public Engagement Amy Homma with curriculum development by Tuni Chatterji, Manager, Film Education and the summit is organized by Eduardo Sánchez, Manager, Public Programs and Lohanne Cook, Public Programs Specialist with special guest programmer, artist, activist, and educator OnRaé Watkins.

CATALOGUE AND MICROSITE
A comprehensive, illustrated catalogue accompanying the exhibition, co-published by the Academy Museum and DelMonico Books, will function as an essential reader on Black visual culture and filmmaking. The catalogue includes a foreword by Whoopi Goldberg; original essays from the co-curators Doris Berger and Rhea L. Combs as well as Donald Bogle, Cara Caddoo, Terri Simone Francis, Michael Boyce Gillespie, Shola Lynch, Ron Magliozzi, Ellen C. Scott, and Jacqueline Stewart; new interviews with award-winning contemporary filmmakers Charles Burnett, Julie Dash, Ava DuVernay, Barry Jenkins, and Dawn Porter; and a filmography and chronology of significant socio-political moments by J. Raúl Guzmán.

The Academy Museum has also produced a complementary microsite (regenerationblackcinema.org), which offers a wide range of informational and educational assets. As the show’s permanent digital home, the site will extend Regeneration’s themes and deliver a rich content experience to both exhibition visitors and curious audiences engaging from home. In addition to original articles, essays, and curricular materials, the site will offer introductory excerpts of the show’s print catalogue and an interactive database capturing the films, filmmakers, and production companies examined in the show

The microsite launches on August 21, 2022 and will be updated with new content regularly throughout the show’s run at the Academy Museum. As Regeneration travels to subsequent venues, the site will update to reflect those new iterations, preserving the total historical record of the exhibition and its rich supporting slate of events, symposia, and screenings.
 

Image Credits: L-R Intro Gallery, Regeneration: Black Cinema 1898-1971, Academy Museum of Motion Pictures. Photo by Joshua White, JW Pictures/ © Academy Museum Foundation; Title Wall, Regeneration: Black Cinema 1898-1971, Academy Museum of Motion Pictures. Photo by Joshua White, JW Pictures/ © Academy Museum Foundation; Race Films, Regeneration: Black Cinema 1898-1971, Academy Museum of Motion Pictures. Photo by Joshua White, JW Pictures/ © Academy Museum Foundation.

Exhibition Credit: Regeneration: Black Cinema 1898–1971 is the recipient of the 2018 Sotheby’s Prize. The Sotheby’s Prize was founded to support and encourage museums to break new ground by recognizing curatorial excellence and facilitating an upcoming exhibition that explores overlooked or underrepresented art history. The Sotheby’s Prize was awarded by a jury of museum curators and directors comprising Sir Nicholas Serota, Donna De Salvo, Okwui Enwezor (1963–2019), Connie Butler, Emilie Gordenker, and chaired by Allan Schwartzman. Regeneration is made possible in part by major grants from the National Endowment for the Humanities. Technology solutions generously provided by Christie®. Lead support provided by Campari®. Generous support provided by the National Endowment for the Arts, J. P. Morgan Private Bank, the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors through the Los Angeles County Department of Arts and Culture, and Octavia Spencer. Support also provided by Sybil Robson Orr, Daniel Allen Sims and Althea R. Miller-Sims, Lyndon J. Barrois Sr. and Janine Sherman Barrois, Chaz Hammel-Smith Ebert and Rogerebert.com, Morgan Freeman, Lori McCreary and Revelations Entertainment, Max and Kahlia Konan, Emma Koss, Alana Mayo, Mary Parent and Javier Chapa, Nina Shaw and Wallace Little, and Yeardley Smith. Exhibition programs are made possible in part by California Humanities, a non-profit partner of the National Endowment for the Humanities. Academy Film Archive restorations are funded in part by grants from the National Endowment for the Arts and the Capital Group Companies Charitable Foundation. Academy Museum Digital Engagement Platform sponsored by Bloomberg Philanthropies.


About the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures
The Academy Museum is the largest museum in the United States devoted to the arts, sciences, and artists of moviemaking. The museum advances the understanding, celebration, and preservation of cinema through inclusive and accessible exhibitions, screenings, programs, initiatives, and collections. Designed by Pritzker Prize-winning architect Renzo Piano, the museum’s campus contains the restored and revitalized historic Saban Building—formerly known as the May Company building (1939)—and a soaring spherical addition. Together, these buildings contain 50,000 square feet of exhibition spaces, two state-of-the-art theaters, the Shirley Temple Education Studio, and beautiful public spaces that are free and open to the public. These include: The Walt Disney Company Piazza and the Sidney Poitier Grand Lobby, which houses the Spielberg Family Gallery, Academy Museum Store, and Fanny’s restaurant and café. The Academy Museum exhibition galleries are open seven days a week, with hours Sunday through Thursday from 10am to 6pm and Friday and Saturday from 10am to 8pm.

Academy Museum of Motion Pictures presents TECHNICOLOR SUMMER: DORIS DAY MATINEES – Pillow Talk –

Commemorate what would have been the 100th birthday of actor and singer Doris Day with a book signing of Doris Day: Images of a Hollywood Icon, followed by a screening of Day’s film Pillow Talk.

Los Angeles, Calif. – Doris Day and Rock Hudson joined forces onscreen for the first time in this classic widescreen romantic comedy that helped establish the stars as an iconic pair and earned Day her only Best Actress nomination.

Day plays Jan, an interior decorator who does not realize her new beau, a Texas rancher (Hudson), is actually the womanizing composer she’s unwillingly sharing a party line with. The witty script (by Stanley Shapiro and Maurice Richlin, with story by Russell Rouse and Clarence Greene) won an Oscar for Writing (Story and Screenplay – written directly for the screen) in a field of such eclectic and impressive nominees as The 400 Blows, North by Northwest, and Wild Strawberries. Additional nominations went to the colorful art direction, Frank De Vol’s peppy score, and the priceless Supporting Actress-nominated performance by the great Thelma Ritter. 

Doris Day celebration continues with a book signing of DORIS DAY: IMAGES OF A HOLLYWOOD ICON (Hermes Press, 2022) on August 13, signed in-person by longtime Day associates and co-editors Jim Pierson and Lea Price, and special guest Jackie Joseph!

DIRECTOR: Michael Gordon. WRITTEN BY: Stanley Shapiro, Maurice Richlin. CAST: Rock Hudson, Doris Day, Tony Randall, Thelma Ritter. 1959. 110 min. USA. English. Color. Scope. 35mm.   
Academy Museum film programming generously funded by the Richard Roth Foundation.

TED MANN THEATER

  • SaturdayAugust 13, 20222pm PT
  • https://www.academymuseum.org/en/programs/detail/pillow-talk-01812663-8d1e-64a8-76a2-d82cdbca1a66

JULIA ROBERTS TO BE HONORED WITH ICON AWARD AT THEACADEMY MUSEUM GALA ON OCTOBER 15, 2022.

JULIA ROBERTS JOINS PREVIOUSLY ANNOUNCED HONOREES MIKY LEE, STEVE MCQUEEN, AND TILDA SWINTON, Ariana DeBose, Awkwafina, Colman Domingo, Cynthia Erivo, Dakota Johnson, Eddie Redmayne, Eiza González, Gwyneth Paltrow, Jennifer Garner, Jonathan Majors, Judd Apatow & Leslie Mann,  Leonardo DiCaprio, Letitia Wright, Regina Hall, Ruth Negga, Selma Blair and More Join Academy Museum Gala Host Committee.

LOS ANGELES, CA, JULY 15, 2022—The Academy Museum of Motion Pictures today announced that Academy AwardⓇ-winning actor Julia Roberts, whose career spans three decades, will be honored with the Academy Museum Gala Icon Award. She will join previously announced honorees Miky Lee, Steve McQueen, and Tilda Swinton, each set to be recognized for their invaluable contributions to cinema, at the second annual Academy Museum Gala being held on October 15, 2022.

The evening is presented by Rolex and co-chaired by Academy Award-winning actor and Academy Museum supporter Halle Berry, Academy Museum Trustee and producer Jason Blum, Academy Museum Trustee and screenwriter-director-producer Ryan Murphy, and Academy Award-winning actor Lupita Nyong’o.

The awards presented at the Gala will include:

  • The Icon Award, presented to Julia Roberts, celebrating an artist whose career has had a significant global cultural impact.
  • The Vantage Award, presented to Steve McQueen, honoring an artist or scholar who has helped to contextualize and challenge dominant narratives around cinema.
  • The Visionary Award, presented to Tilda Swinton, honoring an artist or scholar whose extensive oeuvre has advanced the art of cinema.
  • The Pillar Award, presented to Miky Lee, which acknowledges exemplary leadership and support for the Academy Museum.

“Over the course of her expansive and renowned career, Julia has embodied iconic characters and memorable roles,” said Jacqueline Stewart, Director and President of the Academy Museum. “We are thrilled to be honoring her continued excellence in the industry and contribution to the arts. We are deeply grateful to Julia, Miky, Steve, and Tilda, to Rolex, and to our co-chairs and host committee for making our second annual Gala an evening to remember.”

The 2022 Academy Museum Gala Host Committee, also announced today, includes Adrien Brody, Amanda Seyfried & Thomas Sadoski, Ariana DeBose, Awkwafina, Billie Lourd, Bryce Dallas Howard, Chloë Sevigny, Colman Domingo, Cynthia Erivo, Dakota Johnson, Darren Criss, Eddie Redmayne, Eiza González, Elle Fanning, Emma Roberts, George C. Wolfe, Glenn Close, Gwyneth Paltrow, Jamie Lee Curtis, Jennifer Garner, Jessica Alba, Joe Jonas & Sophie Turner, Jon Hamm, Jonathan Majors, Judd Apatow & Leslie Mann, Kate Hudson, Kathryn Hahn, Keke Palmer, Kid Cudi, Kirsten Dunst, Leonardo DiCaprio, Letitia Wright, Lily Collins, Lucy Liu, Natasha Lyonne, Orlando Bloom, Regina Hall, Renée Zellweger, Riley Keough, Robert Duvall, Ron Howard, Ruth Negga, Selma Blair, among many others.

The awards, presented annually at the Academy Museum Gala, reflect the museum’s mission to advance the understanding, celebration, and preservation of cinema and to expand knowledge and conversation about cinema as a global artform and cultural force.

The evening raises vital funds to support the museum’s access, education, and programming initiatives. The inaugural 2021 gala raised more than $11MM.

Overseeing event production and design are Gala Creative Director Lisa Love, and Artistic Director Raul Àvila. 

ABOUT ROLEX AND CINEMA
For many decades, Rolex has maintained close ties with the world of cinema. Its watches have played a role in numerous films, including Oscar®-winning masterpieces. The company promotes excellence, encourages the preservation and transmission of the cinematic arts and celebrates progress by accompanying cinema legends and budding talents: through its Testimonees such as Martin Scorsese and James Cameron, its partnership with the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences and the Rolex Mentor and Protégé Arts Initiative, with its mentorships for talented young filmmakers. Rolex has partnered the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences since 2017, serving as Proud Sponsor of the Oscars, hosting the event’s Greenroom, while also supporting the Governors Awards, recognizing lifetime achievement in film. To assist in the preservation of film history for future generations, Rolex became a Founding Supporter of the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures in Los Angeles. Through its support of the film industry, Rolex champions excellence, the perpetuation of knowledge, the conservation of the art of filmmaking and the rise of new talent.

Image: Julia Roberts, photo by Tom Munro

About the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures
The Academy Museum is the largest museum in the United States devoted to the arts, sciences, and artists of moviemaking. The museum advances the understanding, celebration, and preservation of cinema through inclusive and accessible exhibitions, screenings, programs, initiatives, and collections. Designed by Pritzker Prize-winning architect Renzo Piano, the museum’s campus contains the restored and revitalized historic Saban Building—formerly known as the May Company building (1939)—and a soaring spherical addition. Together, these buildings contain 50,000 square feet of exhibition spaces, two state-of-the-art theaters, Shirley Temple Education Studio, and beautiful public spaces that are free and open to the public. These include: The Walt Disney Company Piazza and the Sidney Poitier Grand Lobby, which houses the Spielberg Family Gallery, Academy Museum Store, and Fanny’s restaurant and café. The Academy Museum exhibition galleries are open seven days a week, with hours Sunday through Thursday from 10am to 6pm and Friday and Saturday from 10am to 8pm.