Tag Archives: Academy Museum of Motion Pictures

2022 Oscars: Here Are All the Films Eligible for Oscars at the 94th Academy Awards, Jan 20, 2022.

Los Angeles, Calif. – This year’s Oscars race just got a little tighter. Ahead of the nominations announcement on Feb. 8, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences announced a not-so-shortlist of all the films in contention for Oscars at the 94th Academy Awards.

Two hundred seventy-six (276!) movies have met the Academy’s eligibility requirements, which require a 7-day qualifying run in at least one of six U.S. metropolitan areas. Rule provisions this year allow for drive-in theaters, as well as stipulations for films intended for a theatrical release but forced to pivot to streaming.

Here is every film in the running:

The Addams Family 2

Ageless Love

Ailey

All Light, Everywhere

American Night

American Underdog

Annette

Antlers

The Ape Star

Army of the Dead

Ascension

Attica

Back to the Outback

Becoming Cousteau

Being the Ricardos

Belfast

Belle

Benedetta

Berman Island

Best Sellers

The Beta Test

Billie Eilish: The World’s a Little Blurry

Black Widow

Blue Bayou

Bob Spit – We Do Not Like People

Boogie

Boris Karloff: The Man Behind the Monster

The Boss Baby: Family Business

Brian Wilson: Long Promised Road

Bring Your Own Brigade

Bruised

Candyman

The Card Counter

Censor

Cinderella

Clifford the Big Red Dog

C’mon C’mon

Coda

Coming 2 America

Compartment No. 6

The Conjuring: The Devil Made Me Do It

Convergence: Courage in a Crisis

A Cop Movie

The Courier

A Crime on the Bayou

Cruella

Cry Macho

Cryptozoo

Cusp

Cyrano

Dear Evan Hansen

Don’t Look Up

Dream Horse

Drive My Car

The Dry

The Duke

Dune

East of the Mountains

El Planeta

The Electrical Life of Louis Wain

Encanto

Encounter

Eternals

Everybody’s Talking About Jamie

The Eyes of Tammy Faye

F9: The Fast Saga

Fathom

Faya Dayi

Ferguson Rises

Fever Dream

Final Account

Finch

Finding You

First Date

The First Wave

Fix

Flag Day

Flee

The Forever Purge

Fortune Favors Lady Nikuko

Found

Four Good Days

Franceso

Free Guy

The French Dispatch of the Liberty, Kansas Evening Sun

Ghostbusters: Afterlife

Godzilla vs. Kong

The Good Boss

The Grave

The Green Knight

The Guilty

Halloween Kills

The Hand of God

Hard Luck Love Song

The Harder They Fall

Harper

Here Today

A Hero

Hitman’s Wife’s Bodyguard

Holler

Homeroom

House of Gucci

The Humans

I’m Your Man

In the Earth

In the Heights

In the Same Breath

India Sweets and Spices

Introducing, Selma Blair

Jai Bhim

Jockey

Joe Bell

John and the Hole

Josee, The Tiger and the Fish

A Journal for Jordan

Julia

Jungle Cruise

The Killing of Kenneth Chamberlain

The Killing of Two Lovers

King Richard

The King’s Man

Lamb

Language Lessons

Lansky

Last and First Men

The Last Duel

Last Night in Soho

The Laws of the Universe – The Age of Elohim

Les Nôtres

Licorice Pizza

Like a Rolling Stone: The Life & Times of Ben Fong-Torres

Lily Topples the World

Limbo

The Loneliest Whale: The Search for 52

The Lost Daughter

The Lost Leonardo

Love Is Love Is Love

Luca

Malignant

The Many Saints of Newark

Marakkar: Arabikadalinte Simham

Mass

The Matrix Resurrections

Mayday

Memoria

Minamata

Misha and the Wolves

The Mitchells vs. The Machines

Moffie

Mogul Mowgli

Mortal Kombat

Mother/Android

Mothering Sunday

Munich – The Edge of War

The Mustangs: America’s Wild Horses

My Name Is Pauli Murray

My Sunny Maad

Naked Singularity

National Champions

The Night House

Nightmare Alley

Nine Days

No Man of God

No Ordinary Man

No Sudden Move

No Time to Die

Nobody

The Novice

The Nowhere Inn

Old

Old Henry

Operation Mincemeat

Operation Varsity Blues

Paper Spiders

Parallel Mothers

Passing

Paw Patrol The Movie

Peter Rabbit 2: The Runaway

Petite Maman

Pig

Plan B

Pompo the Cinephile

Poupelle of Chimney Town

The Power of the Dog

Pray Away

Prayers for the Stolen

Prisoners of the Ghostland

Procession

Profile

The Protégé

Qazaq History of the Golden Man

Queenpins

Quiet Explosions: Healing the Brain

A Quiet Place Part II

The Race to Save the World

Raya and the Last Dragon

The Real Charlie Chaplin

Rebel Hearts

Red Notice

Red Rocket

Reminiscence

The Rescue

Respect

Riders of Justice

Roadrunner: A Film About Anthony Bourdain

Ron’s Gone Wrong

Sabaya

Senior Moment

7 Prisoners

Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings

Shiva Baby

Silencio

Silent Night

Silo

Silver Carnation

Sing 2

Sisters on Track

Snake Eyes: G.I. Joe Origins

So Late So Soon

Son of Monarchs

Sophie Jones

The Souvenir Part II

Space Jam: A New Legacy

The Sparks Brothers

Spencer

Spider-Man: No Way Home

The Spine of Night

Spiral

Spirit Untamed

The Starling

Stillwater

Sugar Daddy

The Suicide Squad

Summer of Soul (…Or, When the Revolution Could Not Be Televised)

The Summit of the Gods

Swan Song (Apple Original Films)

Swan Song (Magnolia Pictures)

Tango Shalom

The Tender Bar

Test Pattern

This Is the Night

Those Who Wish Me Dead

Tick, Tick…Boom!

Titane

Together

Together Together

Tom Clancy’s Without Remorse

The Tomorrow War

Torn

The Tragedy of Macbeth

Triumph

Truth to Power

12 Mighty Orphans

The Unforgivable

The Unholy

Val

The Velvet Queen

The Velvet Underground

Venom: Let There Be Carnage

Violet

Vivo

The Wake of Light

The Water Man

The Way

Werewolves Within

West Side Story

Whirlybird

The White Line

Who We Are: A Chronicle of Racism in America

Wish Dragon

Wolf

Women Is Losers

The Worst Person in the World

Worth

Wrath of Man

Zola

Nominations voting begins on Jan. 27 and concludes on Feb. 1, with nominations to be announced on Feb. 8. The 94th Academy Awards will be held on March 27 and air live on ABC.

94TH OSCARS® SHORTLISTS IN 10 AWARD CATEGORIES ANNOUNCED.

Los Angeles, Calif. — The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences today announced shortlists in 10 categories for the 94th Academy Awards®: Documentary Feature, Documentary Short Subject, International Feature Film, Makeup and Hairstyling, Music (Original Score), Music (Original Song), Animated Short Film, Live Action Short Film, Sound and Visual Effects.  Download shortlists by category here.

DOCUMENTARY FEATURE
Fifteen films will advance in the Documentary Feature category for the 94th Academy Awards.  One hundred thirty-eight films were eligible in the category.  Members of the Documentary Branch vote to determine the shortlist and the nominees.

The films, listed in alphabetical order by title, are:

“Ascension”
“Attica”
“Billie Eilish: The World’s a Little Blurry”
“Faya Dayi”
“The First Wave”
“Flee”
“In the Same Breath”
“Julia”
“President”
“Procession”
“The Rescue”
“Simple as Water”
“Summer of Soul (…Or, When the Revolution Could Not Be Televised)”
“The Velvet Underground”
“Writing with Fire”


DOCUMENTARY SHORT SUBJECT
Fifteen films will advance in the Documentary Short Subject category for the 94th Academy Awards.  Eighty-two films qualified in the category.  Members of the Documentary Branch vote to determine the shortlist and the nominees.

The films, listed in alphabetical order by title, are:

“Águilas”
“Audible”
“A Broken House”
“Camp Confidential: America’s Secret Nazis”
“Coded: The Hidden Love of J. C. Leyendecker”
“Day of Rage”
“The Facility”
“Lead Me Home”
“Lynching Postcards: “Token of a Great Day””
“The Queen of Basketball”
“Sophie & the Baron”
“Takeover”
“Terror Contagion”
“Three Songs for Benazir”
“When We Were Bullies”


INTERNATIONAL FEATURE FILM
Fifteen films will advance to the next round of voting in the International Feature Film category for the 94th Academy Awards.  Films from 92 countries were eligible in the category.

Academy members from all branches were invited to participate in the preliminary round of voting and must have met a minimum viewing requirement to be eligible to vote in the category.

In the nominations round, Academy members from all branches are invited to opt in to participate and must view all 15 shortlisted films to vote. 

The films, listed in alphabetical order by country, are:

Austria, “Great Freedom”
Belgium, “Playground”
Bhutan, “Lunana: A Yak in the Classroom”
Denmark, “Flee”
Finland, “Compartment No. 6”
Germany, “I’m Your Man”
Iceland, “Lamb”
Iran, “A Hero”
Italy, “The Hand of God”
Japan, “Drive My Car”
Kosovo, “Hive”
Mexico, “Prayers for the Stolen”
Norway, “The Worst Person in the World”
Panama, “Plaza Catedral”
Spain, “The Good Boss”


MAKEUP AND HAIRSTYLING 
Ten films will advance in the Makeup and Hairstyling category for the 94th Academy Awards.  All members of the Academy’s Makeup Artists and Hairstylists Branch will be invited to view seven-minute excerpts and interviews with the artists from each of the shortlisted films on Sunday, January 30, 2022.  Branch members will vote to nominate five films for final Oscar® consideration.

The films, listed in alphabetical order by title, are:

“Coming 2 America”
“Cruella”
“Cyrano”
“Dune”
“The Eyes of Tammy Faye”
“House of Gucci”
“Nightmare Alley”
“No Time to Die”
“The Suicide Squad”
“West Side Story”


MUSIC (ORIGINAL SCORE)
Fifteen scores will advance in the Original Score category for the 94th Academy Awards.  One hundred thirty-six scores were eligible in the category.  Members of the Music Branch vote to determine the shortlist and the nominees.


The scores, listed in alphabetical order by film title, are:

“Being the Ricardos”
“Candyman”
“Don’t Look Up”
“Dune”
“Encanto”
“The French Dispatch of the Liberty, Kansas Evening Sun”
“The Green Knight”
“The Harder They Fall”
“King Richard”
“The Last Duel”
“No Time to Die”
“Parallel Mothers”
“The Power of the Dog”
“Spencer”
“The Tragedy of Macbeth”


MUSIC (ORIGINAL SONG)
Fifteen songs will advance in the Original Song category for the 94th Academy Awards.  Eighty-four songs were eligible in the category.  Members of the Music Branch vote to determine the shortlist and the nominees.

The original songs, along with the motion picture in which each song is featured, are listed below in alphabetical order by film title:

“So May We Start?” from “Annette”
“Down To Joy” from “Belfast”
“Right Where I Belong” from “Brian Wilson: Long Promised Road”
“Automatic Woman” from “Bruised”
“Dream Girl” from “Cinderella”
“Beyond The Shore” from “CODA”
“The Anonymous Ones” from “Dear Evan Hansen”
“Just Look Up” from “Don’t Look Up”
“Dos Oruguitas” from “Encanto”
“Somehow You Do” from “Four Good Days”
“Guns Go Bang” from “The Harder They Fall”
“Be Alive” from “King Richard”
“No Time To Die” from “No Time to Die”
“Here I Am (Singing My Way Home)” from “Respect”
“Your Song Saved My Life” from “Sing 2”


ANIMATED SHORT FILM
Fifteen films will advance in the Animated Short Film category for the 94th Academy Awards.  Eighty-two films qualified in the category.  Members of the Short Films and Feature Animation Branch vote to determine the shortlist and the nominees.

The films, listed in alphabetical order by title, are:

“Affairs of the Art”
“Angakusajaujuq: The Shaman’s Apprentice”
“Bad Seeds”
“Bestia”
“Boxballet”
“Flowing Home”
“Mum Is Pouring Rain”
“The Musician”
“Namoo”
“Only a Child”
“Robin Robin”
“Souvenir Souvenir”
“Step into the River”
“Us Again”
“The Windshield Wiper”


LIVE ACTION SHORT FILM
Fifteen films will advance in the Live Action Short Film category for the 94th Academy Awards.  One hundred forty-five films qualified in the category.  Members of the Short Films and Feature Animation, Directors, Producers and Writers Branches vote to determine the shortlist and the nominees.

The films, listed in alphabetical order by title, are:

“Ala Kachuu – Take and Run”
“Censor of Dreams”
“The Criminals”
“Distances”
“The Dress”
“Frimas”
“Les Grandes Claques”
“The Long Goodbye”
“On My Mind”
“Please Hold”
“Stenofonen”
“Tala’vision”
“Under the Heavens”
“When the Sun Sets”
“You’re Dead Helen”


SOUND
Ten films will advance in the Sound category for the 94th Academy Awards.  Members of the Sound Branch vote to determine the shortlist and the nominees.  All members of the Sound Branch will be invited to view eight-minute excerpts and interviews with the artists from each of the shortlisted films beginning Friday, January 28, 2022.  Branch members will vote to nominate five films for final Oscar consideration.

The films, listed in alphabetical order by title, are:

“Belfast”
“Dune”
“Last Night in Soho”
“The Matrix Resurrections”
“No Time to Die”
“The Power of the Dog”
“A Quiet Place Part II”
“Spider-Man: No Way Home”
“tick, tick…BOOM!”
“West Side Story”


VISUAL EFFECTS
Ten films remain in the running in the Visual Effects category for the 94th Academy Awards.  The Visual Effects Branch Executive Committee determined the shortlist.  All members of the Visual Effects Branch will be invited to view 10-minute excerpts and interviews with the artists from each of the shortlisted films on Saturday, January 29, 2022.  Branch members will vote to nominate five films for final Oscar consideration.

The films, listed in alphabetical order by title, are:

“Black Widow”
“Dune”
“Eternals”
“Free Guy”
“Ghostbusters: Afterlife”
“Godzilla vs. Kong”
“The Matrix Resurrections”
“No Time to Die”
“Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings”
“Spider-Man: No Way Home”

Nominations voting begins on Thursday, January 27, 2022, and concludes on Tuesday, February 1, 2022.

Nominations for the 94th Academy Awards will be announced on Tuesday, February 8, 2022.

The 94th Oscars® will be held on Sunday, March 27, 2022, at the Dolby® Theatre at Hollywood & Highland® in Hollywood and will be televised live on ABC and in more than 200 territories worldwide.

ABOUT THE ACADEMY
The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences is a global community of more than 10,000 of the most accomplished artists, filmmakers and executives working in film. In addition to celebrating and recognizing excellence in filmmaking through the Oscars, the Academy supports a wide range of initiatives to promote the art and science of the movies, including public programming, educational outreach and the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures.

FOLLOW THE ACADEMY
www.oscars.org
www.facebook.com/TheAcademy
www.youtube.com/Oscars
www.twitter.com/TheAcademy
www.instagram.com/TheAcademy

ACADEMY REVEALS WINNING NICHOLL SCREENWRITERS.

Nicholl Fellows to be featured in conversations with Destin Daniel Cretton,
Phil Lord, Our Lady J, Rawson Marshall Thurber and Olivia Wilde
beginning November 8, 2021.

Los Angeles, Calif. – Five individuals have been selected as winners of the 2021 Academy Nicholl Fellowships in Screenwriting competition.  The fellows will each receive a $35,000 prize and mentorship from an Academy member throughout their fellowship year.  From November 8 to 12, one fellow per day will be featured on the Academy’s YouTube channel, in content including conversations with filmmakers Destin Daniel Cretton, Phil Lord, Our Lady J, Rawson Marshall Thurber and Olivia Wilde.  View a preview here.

The 2021 winners are (listed alphabetically by author):

Haley Hope Bartels (Los Angeles, CA), “Pumping Black”
After a desperate cyclist takes up a team doctor’s dangerous offer, he seems on course to win the Tour de France.  But as the race progresses and jealous teammates, suspicious authorities, and his own paranoia close in, he must take increasingly dark measures to protect both his secrets and his lead.

Karin delaPeña Collison (West Hollywood, CA), “Coming of Age”
In 1965 Britain, Charlotte, a sheltered, studious schoolgirl, lands on a British Farce tour her mother stage manages, where private tutoring by company members replaces her formal schooling, with surprising success, and she experiences a Lolita-like flirtation in the morally wobbly era of Free Love, which leads both her and her mother to ‘come of age.’

Byron Hamel (Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada), “Shade of the Grapefruit Tree”
When a severely abused white boy befriends his sci-fi obsessed Black landlady, his fantasy of becoming a robot empowers him to recklessly confront his murderous stepdad.

R. J. Daniel Hanna (Los Angeles, CA), “Shelter Animal”
A fiery, female prison trustee working at the county animal shelter finds purpose rehabilitating an abused pit bull, but her attempts to rally employees and the broader community for shelter reform puts her own freedom at risk.

Laura Kosann (New York, NY), “The Ideal Woman”
Set in American suburbia during the Cuban Missile Crisis: A 1960’s ex-actress and housewife finds her house-of-cards world begin to tumble as she continues to be pitted against two identities.

A record number of 8,191 scripts, from 89 countries, were submitted for this year’s competition.  The first and quarterfinal rounds were judged by industry professionals, including graduates of the Academy’s Diverse Reader Training Workshop, a free referral-only program established to train individuals from underrepresented communities to be story analysts.  The semifinal round was judged by Academy members across the spectrum of the motion picture industry.  Ten individual screenwriters were selected as finalists.  Their scripts were then read and judged by the Academy Nicholl Fellowships Committee, who ultimately voted the winners.

The 2021 finalists are (listed alphabetically by author):

Adam Everett, “Aurora”
Takeo Hori, “American Infamy”
Michael Ouzas, “Third Man”
Jesse White, “Stronghold”
Aaron C. Wong, “Garamba”

Fellowships are awarded with the understanding that the recipients will each complete a feature-length screenplay during their fellowship year.  The Academy acquires no rights to the works of Nicholl fellows and does not involve itself commercially in any way with their completed scripts.

The Academy Nicholl Fellowships Committee is chaired by Academy Short Films and Feature Animation Branch governor Jennifer Yuh Nelson.  The members of the committee are John Bailey and Steven Poster (Cinematographers Branch); William Mechanic (Executives Branch); James Plannette and Stephen Ujlaki (Members-at-Large); Julia Chasman, Peter Samuelson and Robert W. Shapiro (Producers Branch); Bobbi Banks (Sound Branch); and Eric Heisserer, Larry Karaszewski, Dan Petrie Jr., Misan Sagay and Dana Stevens (Writers Branch).

The global competition, which aims to identify and encourage talented new screenwriters, has awarded 171 fellowships since it began in 1986.  In 2021, several past Nicholl fellows added to their feature film and television credits:

  • Alfredo Botello co-wrote the story for Universal Pictures’ “F9: The Fast Saga.”
  • Allison and Nicolas Buckmelter’s Nicholl-winning script, “American Refugee,” will make its debut on EPIX and Paramount Home Entertainment on December 10.
  • Destin Daniel Cretton directed and co-wrote, with fellow Andrew Lanham, Marvel Studios’ “Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings.”
  • Anthony Grieco’s Nicholl-winning script, “Best Sellers,” was released by Screen Media and stars Michael Caine and Aubrey Plaza.
  • Matt Harris’s fellowship year script, “The Starling,” was released by Netflix and stars Melissa McCarthy.
  • Geeta Malik wrote and directed “India Sweets and Spices,” which debuted at Tribeca Film Festival.  The film was adapted from her Nicholl-winning script, “Dinner with Friends.”
  • Andrew W. Marlowe and Terri Edda Miller are executive producers and showrunners on season two of CBS’s “The Equalizer,” starring Queen Latifah.
  • Stephanie Shannon was executive story editor and a writer on Apple TV+’s augmented reality experience “For All Mankind: Time Capsule,” which won an Emmy for Outstanding Innovation in Interactive Programming.
  • Rebecca Sonnenshine was the executive producer and writer on an episode of Amazon Prime’s “The Boys” that was nominated for an Emmy for Outstanding Writing for a Drama Series.  She is currently showrunning Netflix’s “Archive 81.”

For more information about the Academy Nicholl Fellowships in Screenwriting, visit oscars.org/nicholl.

Visit https://www.facebook.com/academygold for updates. Watch the 2020 Nicholl Fellowships in Screenwriting Awards & Table Read presentation. You can email us at nicholl@oscars.org.
 

ABOUT THE ACADEMY
The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences is a global community of more than 10,000 of the most accomplished artists, filmmakers and executives working in film. In addition to celebrating and recognizing excellence in filmmaking through the Oscars, the Academy supports a wide range of initiatives to promote the art and science of the movies, including public programming, educational outreach and the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures.

FOLLOW THE ACADEMY
www.oscars.org
www.facebook.com/TheAcademy
www.youtube.com/Oscars
www.twitter.com/TheAcademy
www.instagram.com/TheAcademy

Academy Museum and the Haas Brothers Announce Limited-Edition NFT Inspired by the Museum’s Academy Museum Pillar Award, the Future of Cinema Gallery.

Los Angeles, Oct. 20, 2021—Bill Kramer, Director and President of the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures, today announced that Los Angeles-based artists Nikolai and Simon Haas will issue limited-edition NFTs to benefit the Academy Museum’s access, education, and programming initiatives. The NFTs will be available via an OpenSea auction from October 20 to 25, 2021.

The design of the Academy Museum/The Haas Brothers NFTs is inspired by the Academy Museum Pillar Award, also created by The Haas Brothers, which references the museum’s soaring sphere building and the iconic gold of the Oscar®. This award is presented annually at the Academy Museum Gala to a philanthropist or philanthropists who have meaningfully supported the museum. It was first awarded to Academy Museum Campaign Chairs Bob Iger, Annette Bening, and Tom Hanks at the Academy Museum Opening Gala on September 25, 2021.

The Academy Museum/The Haas Brothers NFTs are moving renderings of the Pillar Award combined with marquee quotes by film industry leaders sourced from The Future of Cinema gallery, the exit gallery in the museum’s three-floor core exhibition Stories of Cinema. Each quote is minted in five different colors. The first grouping to be issued—comprising five NFTs—will feature a quote from actor Whoopi Goldberg that reads, “The future of cinema is in your hands now.” Other editions of the NFT will feature quotes from additional filmmakers and film artists including Howard Berger, Effie T. Brown, Sid Ganis, and R.J. Kizer.

Bill Kramer said, “We are thrilled to be working with Niki and Simon Haas on both the Pillar Award and on our first NFTs. Their work brilliantly embodies the optimism, beauty, and bold storytelling found at the Academy Museum. The Haas Brothers are dynamically envisioning our gallery, The Future of Cinema, in a new way—and supporting activities that are vital to our own future as an institution—by reimagining the Pillar Award in the forward-looking medium of NFTs.”

“Designing the Pillar Award represented an opportunity to pay homage to the film industry’s rich history and express our reverence for an art form which continues to change the world,” said The Haas Brothers. “Film as a medium is, at its core, fiercely experimental. We have looked to film as a touchstone for our own practice, holding its embrace of new media and experimentation as a guiding principle for artmaking. We are proud to carry this ethos into the newest medium of all, NFTs, with a digital Pillar Award whose existence is a testament to the power of curiosity and the relentless pursuit of storytelling. We are proud to collaborate with the Academy Museum on this opportunity.”

ABOUT THE HAAS BROTHERS
Since founding The Haas Brothers in 2010, twin brothers Nikolai and Simon (b. 1984; Austin, TX) have upended conventional boundaries and hierarchies between and within creative fields. The ethos of their studio is to define themselves by what they stand for rather than what they are in opposition to; what to some resembles rebellion and irreverence is in fact full-hearted curiosity and excitement for the endless modes of self-expression. The Haas Brothers embrace art, craft, and design in equal measure—approaching art like filmmakers with a goal of transporting viewers into a reality of their creation by any means necessary. With an emphasis on felt-sense and a voracious appetite for new mediums with which to express themselves, The Haas Brothers process their experience of the world and make manifest a fantasy-rich world of their own.

Their first solo museum show opened at The Bass Museum of Art in 2018 and their work is held in the collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA), and the Rhode Island School of Design Museum. In 2019, they were the recipients of the Arison Award given by the YoungArts Foundation. The Haas Brothers are represented by Marianne Boesky and United Talent Agency. They live and work in Los Angeles.

IMAGES: The Future of Cinema NFT renderings, 2021, Courtesy The Haas Brothers

ABOUT THE ACADEMY MUSEUM
The Academy Museum is the largest museum in the United States devoted to the arts, sciences, and artists of moviemaking. The museum advances the understanding, celebration, and preservation of cinema through inclusive and accessible exhibitions, screenings, programs, initiatives, and collections. Designed by Pritzker Prize-winning architect Renzo Piano and Renzo Piano Building Workshop in collaboration with Gensler as executive architect, the museum’s campus contains the restored and revitalized historic Saban Building—formerly known as the May Company building (1939)—and a soaring spherical addition. Together, these buildings contain 50,000 square feet of exhibition spaces, two state-of-the-art theaters, an education studio, restaurant, retail store, and beautiful public spaces.

Civic and Cultural Leaders Gather on September 30 to Dedicate the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures in Los Angeles.

Los Angeles to Light its Landmarks in Gold to Celebrate the Academy Museum’s Opening.

Los Angeles, Calif. – September 30, 2021Officials representing the Academy Museum, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, the City and County of Los Angeles, the State of California, and the Tongva community gathered this morning before an invited audience of cultural and philanthropic leaders to dedicate the new Academy Museum of Motion Pictures and declare it open to the public.


Representing the Museum were Academy Museum President and Director Bill Kramer, Academy Museum Board Chair Ted Sarandos, Academy Museum Inclusion Advisory Committee Chair Effie T. Brown, Academy CEO Dawn Hudson,andAcademy President David Rubin.

“Los Angeles is the movie capital of the world, and we are thrilled to be unveiling the Academy Museum in the heart of the city,” Bill Kramer said. “Our museum celebrates the art and artists of moviemaking, and we are honored to be greeted by these signals of recognition from other landmarks across LA.”

“Los Angeles is the movie capital of the world, and we are thrilled to be unveiling the Academy Museum in the heart of the city,” Bill Kramer said. “Our museum celebrates the art and artists of moviemaking, and we are honored to be greeted by these signals of recognition from other landmarks across LA. We are deeply grateful to Mayor Garcetti for leading this initiative.”

Joining leadership of the Museum and the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences for the ceremonial ribbon-cutting were Mayor Eric Garcetti, City Councilmember (District 4) Nithya Raman, California Film Commission Executive President Colleen Bell, Tongva Spiritual Leader Jimi Castillo, and Tongva Community Leader Virginia Carmelo.

In his remarks, Mayor Garcetti announced that landmark buildings will be bathed at night in gold illumination to welcome the Academy Museum to Los Angeles. The Ferris Wheel at Pacific Park on the Santa Monica Pier, Union Station Los Angeles, the U.S. Bank Tower, the GRAMMY Museum®, and the Petersen Automotive Museum will be lit in gold.

“As the creative capital of the world, we’re so proud in Los Angeles of our legacy of moviemaking,” said Mayor Eric Garcetti. “The Academy Museum is an incredible addition to our cultural landscape. By honoring the films that have sparked our imaginations and even changed our lives, it will inspire people for generations to come.”

Originally constructed for the May Company department store, the Academy Museum’s 1939 Streamline Moderne Saban Building was designed by Albert C. Martin, Sr., who was also the architect for the 1928 Art Deco Los Angeles City Hall.

Councilmember Nithya Raman said, “The Academy Museum feels like a bit of a parallel to the dream that draws so many to Los Angeles. And as a Councilmember who has the extraordinary privilege of representing this District, I am truly amazed by what has been accomplished here by the Academy, its donors, and its partners, both private and public. This is proof we can still do BIG things in Los Angeles.”


Colleen Bell said, “Now we have a triumphant new museum that encompasses the movies as an industry, a society, an artistic source of meaning and identity. The Academy Museum is a destination where visitors not only from across our state, but from around the world, will find inspiration and connection with each other.”

Dawn Hudson said, “Practically the first thing the founders of the Academy did, after they created the Oscars in 1929, was to propose building a movie museum in Los Angeles. The Oscars® honor individual achievements in filmmaking, year by year, one night a year. But an Academy Museum would honor the art of film itself, 365 days a year, for all time. That was what the founders dared to imagine nearly a century ago. This is the museum of filmmakers everywhere, made for audiences everywhere, now and into the future.”

David Rubin said, “I’m proud to say that the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences is among the institutions that have changed things for the better. We’ve done it in the Academy Film Archive, and in the Margaret Herrick Library. We’ve done it through our educational programs, fellowships, grants, and awards. And now we’ve done it by giving Los Angeles, and the world, this spectacular new home for the movies. We’ve made our dream a reality—and we want to welcome absolutely everyone to share in its treasures—and delight in the celebration of motion pictures.”

Effie T. Brown said, “This is a great day for Los Angeles. A great day for movie lovers. And especially great for the film community. We always knew our community is broader in outlook, rich in experience, and varied in culture—more so than the standard histories have told us. You can see, hear, and feel this at the Academy Museum. Here is a museum, with the entire weight of the Academy behind it, that embraces and champions the diversity of artists who have always been present in the film industry then and now.”

Ted Sarandos said, “When I moved to Los Angeles, I thought that I would find a museum that would honor the art of film and the role that movies play in our lives. But that place didn’t exist. Somehow there was no film center, here in the global center of film. Now we have the Academy Museum, which is opening to the public for the first time today but already feels as if it’s been here forever. That shows you, in itself, how much this museum has been needed.”

About the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures
The Academy Museum is the largest museum in the United States devoted to the arts, sciences, and artists of moviemaking. The museum advances the understanding, celebration, and preservation of cinema through inclusive and accessible exhibitions, screenings, programs, initiatives, and collections. Designed by Pritzker Prize-winning architect Renzo Piano, the museum’s campus contains the restored and revitalized historic Saban Building—formerly known as the May Company building (1939)—and a soaring spherical addition. Together, these buildings contain 50,000 square feet of exhibition spaces, two state-of-the-art theaters, an education studio, restaurant, retail store, and beautiful public spaces.

Academy Museum of Motion Pictures Opening Gala Honors Sophia Loren and Haile Gerima, as well as Academy Museum Campaign leaders Bob Iger, Annette Bening, and Tom Hanks.

The Star-Studded Gala, Co-Chaired by Jason Blum, Ava Duvernay, and Ryan Murphy,
was Presented by Rolex with Leadership Support by J.P. Morgan. The Event Raised More Than $11 Million for the Los Angeles’s Newest Museum, Dedicated to the Arts, Sciences, and Artists of Moviemaking.

Los Angeles, Calif. – On September 25, 2021, as part of a week of celebrations culminating in the museum’s public opening on September 30, 2021,the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures hosted an Opening Gala co-chaired by Jason BlumAva Duvernay, and Ryan Murphy. The celebratory evening included the presentation of the inaugural Vantage Award to Haile Gerima, for his work as a filmmaker who has helped to contextualize and challenge dominant narratives around cinema, and the inaugural Visionary Award to Sophia Loren, for her extensive body of work that has advanced the art of cinema. The Vantage and Visionary Awards were generously presented by Rolex. Bob IgerAnnette Bening, and Tom Hanks were also recognized with the Pillar Award for their leadership of the recently completed Campaign for the Academy Museum. Designed by the Haas Brothers, the Pillar Award references the soaring sphere of the Academy Museum and the iconic gold of the Oscar.

The event was attended by many notable actors and filmmakers, who came together to support the new museum, which advances the understanding, celebration, and preservation of cinema. Produced and designed by Opening Gala Creative Director Lisa Love and Artistic Director Raúl À vilathe evening was inspired by Academy Award®-winning movie Spirited Away , written and directed by acclaimed filmmaker Hayao Miyazaki. From a cocktail hour on the Wilshire Terrace, guests passed through a whimsical Hayao Miyazaki inspired “tree tunnel” to a dinner under the stars on the Dolby Family Terrace. Guests enjoyed a special musical performance by Lady Gaga and the opportunity to preview the museum’s highly immersive exhibitions, including a retrospective of the work of Hayao Miyazaki. Dinner was prepared by Wolfgang Puck Catering, which oversees catering services at the museum and its restaurant Fanny’s.

Generously presented by Rolex—founding supporter and official watch partner of the Academy Museum—with leadership support from J.P. Morgan, who has more than one hundred years of experience in the entertainment industry, the evening raised more than $11 million to support the Academy Museum’s access, education, and programming initiatives.         

Academy Museum Trustees
Arnaud Boetsch, Jason Blum, Laura Dern, Diane von Furstenberg, Olivier de Givenchy, Ray Halbritter, Tom Hanks (and Honoree), Miky Lee, Eva Longoria, Alejandro Ramirez Magaña, Ryan Murphy, Dominic Ng, Ted Sarandos, Jeremy Scott, Kimberly Steward, and Emma Thomas.

Academy and Museum Leadership
Academy Museum Director and President Bill Kramer, Academy Museum Chief Artistic and Programming Officer Jacqueline Stewart, Academy Museum COO and General Counsel Brendan Connell, Jr., Academy President and Academy Museum Trustee David Rubin, and Academy CEO and Academy Museum Trustee Dawn Hudson.

Gala Partners
Gala co-chairs Ryan Murphy, Jason Blum, and Ava DuVernay, honorees Haile Gerima, Sophia Loren, Bob Iger, and Annette Bening and Tom Hanks.

Guests
Academy Museum architect Renzo Piano, J.J. Abrams, Sasha Alexander, Judd Apatow, Robert Armani, Nicole Avant, Angela Bassett, Warren Beatty, Colleen Bell, Halle Berry, Selma Blair, Orlando Bloom, Diego Boneta, Abigail Breslin, Charles Burnett, Ruth Carter, Bob Chapek, Cher, Eva Chow, Clifton Collins, Jr., Laverne Cox, Darren Criss, Benedict Cumberbatch, Jamie Lee Curtis, Julie Dash, Ariana Debose, Jenna Dewan, Ernest R. Dickerson, Barry Diller, Grigor Dimitrov, Ashgar Farhadi, Lady Gaga, Mayor of Los Angeles Eric Garcetti, Kaia Gerber, Maggie Gyllenhaal, Nikolai & Simon Haas, Tiffany Haddish, Rebecca Halls, Colin Hanks, Lydia Hearst, Kathy and Rick Hilton, Jennifer Hudson, Kate Hudson, Van Hunt, Alejandro González Iñárritu, Cheyenne Jackson, Arthur Jafa, Patty Jenkins, Jeffrey Katzenberg, Michael Keaton, Anna Kendrick, Riley Keough, Nicole Kidman, Regina King, Shaka King, Maryse Knight, Spike Lee, Shawn Levy, Adriana Lima, Billie Lourd, Emmanuel “Chivo” Lubezki, Natasha Lyonne, Bob Mackie, Jenna Malone, Frank Marshall, Marlee Matlin, Thuso Mbedu, Max Minghella, Kate and Laura Mulleavy, Kumail Nanjiani, Ruth Negga, Christopher Nolan, Normani, Sarah Paulson, Katy Perry, Arianne Phillips, Edoardo Ponti, Zac Posen, Questlove, Lily Rabe, Issa Rae, Andrea Riseborough, Olivia Rodrigo, MJ Rodriguez, David O. Russell, Meg Ryan, Filippo Scotti, Diana Silvers, Kodi Smit-McPhee, Jurnee Smollett, Aaron Sorkin, Paolo Sorrentino, Morgan Spector, Carly Steel, Holland Taylor, Sean Patrick Thomas, Tessa Thompson, Guillermo del Toro, Gabrielle Union, Lindsey Vonn, Dwyane Wade, John Waters, Rita Wilson, Edgar Wright, Kulapat Yantrasast, and Chloe Zhao.

Like the museum’s Hayao Miyazaki exhibition, the gala is designed as a journey, with décor inspired by the filmmaker’s enchanted worlds. Guests entered the event via a green carpet with large floral installations referencing Miyazaki’s depictions of the natural environment and the exhibition’s immersive Magical Forest. The floral arrangements, along with that tree tunnel that connects the museum’s two terraces, are created by Raúl Àvila Inc.

Marking the seventh year of a long-term partnership between Piper-Heidsieck and the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, Piper-Heidsieck provided the exclusive champagne of the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures opening celebrations. Rare Champagne Rosé 2007 and Rare Champagne Brut Millésime 2006 were served at the Opening Gala. 


The cocktail hour featured signature drinks created by Diageo included Don Julio Ranch Water, Don Julio Limonada, Tanqueray Negroni, Ketel One Classic Martini, and Johnnie Walker Fuzhou Highball. Various spirits from Diageo’s portfolio were served including Tequila Don Julio 1942, Johnnie Walker Blue Label, Tequila Don Julio Blanco, Tanqueray London Dry Gin, Ketel One Vodka, and Johnnie Walker Black Label.

San Benedetto Natural Water andSparkling Mineral Water were served at the Gala. Based in Venice, San Benedetto is a 65-year-old Italian family-owned and operated beverage company and the first company to be recognized by Italy’s Ministry of Environment for its leadership and advancements in environmental stewardship.

The Academy Museum is the largest museum in the United States devoted to the arts, sciences, and artists of moviemaking. The museum advances the understanding, celebration, and preservation of cinema through inclusive and accessible exhibitions, screenings, programs, initiatives, and collections. Designed by Pritzker Prize-winning architect Renzo Piano and Renzo Piano Building Workshop in collaboration with Gensler as executive architect, the museum’s campus contains the restored and revitalized historic Saban Building—formerly known as the May Company building (1939)—and a soaring spherical addition. Together, these buildings contain 50,000 square feet of exhibition spaces, two state-of-the-art theaters, an education studio, restaurant, retail store, and beautiful public spaces. The museum opens to the public on September 30, 2021.

Photos ©Academy Museum Foundation,  Stefanie Keenan- Getty Images/©Academy Museum Foundation, Owen Kolasinski/BFA.com for Academy Museum of Motion Pictures, Stefanie Keenan- Getty Images/©Academy Museum Foundation

Academy Museum of Motion Pictures hosts a Star-Studded Opening Night Gala in Los Angeles, honors Sophia Loren with inaugural Visionary Award.

“Show business is what we do, not what we are.” – Sophia Loren

SOPHIA LOREN and HAILE GERIMA headline as HONOREES OF THE INAUGURAL EVENT AND BOB IGER, ANNETTE BENING, AND TOM HANKS TO BE SALUTED FOR THEIR LEADERSHIP OF THE CAMPAIGN FOR THE ACADEMY MUSEUM. ROLEX, FOUNDING SUPPORTER OF THE ACADEMY MUSEUM, IS THE PRESENTING PARTNER OF THE EVENING.

Los Angeles, Calif.  — The Stars came out to shine as The Academy Museum of Motion Pictures celebrated its opening gala on September 25, 2021 as part of a week of celebrations culminating in the museum’s public opening on September 30, 2021. The Academy Museum of Motion Pictures Gala is presented by Rolex—official watch partner and founding supporter of the Academy Museum—with leadership support from J.P. Morgan.

Co-chairs of the Gala are Academy Museum trustee and film and television producer Jason Blum; Academy Governor and Academy Award®-nominated director Ava Duvernay, who has been serving as an advisor for the exhibition Regeneration: Black Cinema 1898–1971, to be presented by the museum in 2022; and Academy Museum trustee and screenwriter, director and producer Ryan Murphy.

Reflecting its mission to celebrate and advance the understanding of the diverse and varied stories of cinema and cinematic artists, the museum has announced that two annual awards will be presented for the first time at the gala: the Vantage Award, honoring an artist or scholar who has helped to contextualize and challenge dominant narratives around cinema; and theVisionary Award, honoring an artist or scholar whose extensive body of work has advanced the art of cinema. Both awards are generously presented by Rolex.

The inaugural Vantage Award will be presented to Haile Gerima, and the inaugural Visionary Award will be presented to Sophia Loren.

ABOUT SOPHIA LOREN
Sophia’s most recent film The Life Ahead, directed by her son Edoardo Ponti is her first feature film in a decade. Sophia is one of the most renowned and captivating actresses in cinematic history. She’s an Academy Award-winning Italian star that has carved an illustrious career over seven decades. Starting out on screen in the 1950s, Loren gave mesmerizing performances in movies such as It Started in Naples; Black Orchid; A Special Day; Yesterday, Today, Tomorrow; Two Women; and Marriage Italian Style. Throughout her prolific career, she has worked with visionary directors such as Sidney Lumet, Charlie Chaplin, Martin Ritt, Robert Altman, Ettore Scola, and Vittorio De Sica, and has acted alongside screen legends such as Marcello Mastroianni, Marlon Brando, Cary Grant, Clark Gable, and Richard Burton. Loren’s multitude of achievements include two Oscars®, five Golden Globes, a Golden Lion, a Volpi Cup at the Venice Film Festival, Best Actress Award at the Cannes Film Festival, the Honorary Golden Bear for Lifetime Achievement from the Berlin Film Festival, a BAFTA Award, a Grammy Award, ten David di Donatello Awards and three Silver Ribbon Awards. In 1999, the American Film Institute included Loren on the list of the 25 biggest stars in cinema history.

Sophia Loren was the first performer in a foreign language film to be nominated for an Academy Award for her role in the 1960 World War II drama Two Women, released in the United States in 1961. At the 34th Academy Awards Ceremony in 1962 she was awarded the Oscar for Best Actress. Greer Garson accepted the award on her behalf. Loren emerged the winner from fellow nominees, Natalie Wood, Splendor in the Grass; Audrey Hepburn, Breakfast at Tiffany’s; Geraldine Page, Summer and Smoke; and Piper Laurie, The Hustler.

Bob IgerAnnette Bening, and Tom Hanks also will be recognized at the gala for their leadership of the recently completed $388 million Campaign for the Academy Museum.

Bill Kramer, Director and President of the Academy Museum, said, “The Academy Museum is committed to celebrating and championing the work of film artists, scholars and professionals—through our exhibitions, screenings, programs, collection and now, through our annual gala. It is such an honor to be able to recognize both Haile Gerima and Sophia Loren for their impactful and inspirational artistry and to acknowledge the incredible work of our Campaign Committee. We are deeply grateful to our Gala Co-Chairs and our sponsors for their extraordinary leadership and support of this inaugural event.”

Overseeing event production and design are Gala Creative Director Lisa Love and Artistic Director Raul Àvila. Guests will be seated for a special dinner prepared by Wolfgang Puck Catering.

ABOUT HAILE GERIMA
Haile Gerima is an independent filmmaker, professor, and author from Ethiopia who, as a youth, was immersed in Ethiopian traditional theater. After emigrating to the United States, he studied at the Goodman School of Drama at the Art Institute of Chicago, and subsequently the School of Theater, Film and Television at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) during the social protests and revolutionary fervor of the late 1960s. During his studies, Gerima found other African, African American, Chicano and Asian students who were hungry for a way to use cinema to express their stories and visions for another world. Engaging in intense study and critical discussion with these peers forever shaped Haile Gerima’s work and vision – and helped to launch the LA Rebellion film movement.

Gerima’s filmography includes Hour Glass (1972), Child of Resistance (1972), Bush Mama (1975), the award-winning Harvest: 3000 years (1975), Wilmington 10-USA 10,000 (1978), Ashes and Embers (1982), After Winter: Sterling Brown (1985), Sankofa (1993)—which won numerous international awards and accolades, Imperfect Journey (1994), Through the Door of No Return (1997), Adwa: An African Victory (1999), Teza (2008), winner of international awards including Best Screenplay and Jury Award at the Venice Film Festival, Footprints of Pan Africanism (2017), and he just completed a five part documentary, Black Lions, Roman Wolves. Gerima is currently producing The Maroons of the United States documentary and Yatoot Lij, a drama set in Ethiopia as well as a forthcoming book on the making of Sankofa.

Gerima taught film at Howard University in Washington, DC from 1975 until his retirement in 2018, planting seeds of independent storytelling to young African American and international students. He and his wife, filmmaker Shirikiana Aina, co-founded and run Mypheduh Films Distribution Company, Negod Gwad Productions, and Sankofa Video and Bookstore in Washington, DC.

About the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures
The Academy Museum is the largest institution in the United States devoted to the arts, sciences, and artists of moviemaking. The museum advances the understanding, celebration, and preservation of cinema through inclusive and accessible exhibitions, screenings, programs, initiatives, and collections. Designed by Pritzker Prize-winning architect Renzo Piano, the museum’s campus contains the restored and revitalized historic Saban Building—formerly known as the May Company building (1939)—and a soaring spherical addition. Together, these buildings contain 50,000 square feet of exhibition spaces, two state-of-the-art theaters, an education studio, restaurant, retail store, and beautiful public spaces. The museum opens to the public on September 30, 2021.

Post compiled by Margie Anne Clark/Los Angeles Life and Style

Academy Museum of Motion Pictures Opens to the Public on September 30, 2021.

Los Angeles, September 21, 2021Inviting the world into an unparalleled experience of the arts, sciences, artists, and social impact of moviemaking, the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures will open its doors to the public on Thursday, September 30, 2021, following a dedication ceremony attended by civic, cultural, and entertainment leaders and officers of the museum and the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. Located in Los Angeles, the world capital of moviemaking, the new museum is the largest in North America devoted to exploring films and film culture and is the only such museum in Los Angeles.


Bill Kramer, Director and President of the Academy Museum, said, “We are living in changing and ever-evolving times, and now more than ever we need to come together to share our stories, learn from one another, and bond over being entertained and delighted. This is what movies do, and we are thrilled to be opening such a dynamic, diverse and welcoming institution devoted to this beloved artform. I am so deeply grateful to the entire Academy Museum team and all of our partners who have worked with such dedication and integrity in building this new institution—for Los Angeles and for the world.”

Jacqueline Stewart, Chief Artistic and Programming Officer of the Academy Museum, said, “We eagerly await engaging visitors in accessible, multifaceted conversations about the history of filmmaking and the impact that cinema has on our lives. We look forward to welcoming people to the museum, our galleries, theaters, and educational spaces.  We hope visitors will learn more about films they know and love, make new cinematic discoveries, and feel inspired to share their own stories.”

Ted Sarandos, Board Chair of the Academy Museum and Co-CEO of Netflix, said, “The Academy Museum reflects the broad community that creates the collaborative art of the movies, and the museum has been built by that community. On behalf of the board, I thank the Academy’s Board of Governors, campaign chair Bob Iger and co-chairs Annette Bening and Tom Hanks, and the generous individuals, corporations, foundations, and government entities—more than 13,000 in all—whose gifts have made the Academy Museum possible. My special thanks go to the leadership and staff of the Academy Museum, Renzo Piano Building Workshop in collaboration with Gensler, and exhibition designer WHY architecture, whose brilliant work has given us the movie museum we have dreamed of for so long.”

Dawn Hudson, CEO of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, said, “The dream of building a museum dedicated to movies has been 90 years in the making for the Academy. No matter what’s been happening in the world since then, no matter what the challenges, that dream has lived on. Now people from all over the galaxy will enjoy the incredible talents of our members and of all the artists who make movies. This is now a reality that would not have been possible without the dedication and focus of hundreds of incredibly talented people and their will to see it come to life. It is with immense pride that we celebrate the opening of the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures.”

David Rubin, President of the Academy, said, “Since 1929, when the first Academy board and its president Douglas Fairbanks dreamt of a museum devoted to motion pictures, our governors through the decades have sought to realize that dream. The Academy’s branches and governors are grateful to Bill Kramer and the museum staff for their creativity and collaborative spirit, and we salute our Academy CEO Dawn Hudson for her perseverance in reaching this milestone event.”

The seven-story, 300,000-square-foot museum, which draws on the unique resources of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences and is located in the heart of LA’s Miracle Mile, will open with:

  • the 30,000-square-foot core exhibition Stories of Cinema, offering celebratory, critical, and personal perspectives on the disciplines and impact of moviemaking, past and present
  • the temporary exhibition Hayao Miyazakithe first museum retrospective in North America of the work of the acclaimed filmmaker and Studio Ghibli
  • The Path to Cinema: Highlights from the Richard Balzer Collection, with selections from the world’s foremost holdings of pre-cinematic optical toys and devices
  • Backdrop: An Invisible Art, a double-height installation that presents the painting of Mount Rushmore used in North by Northwest (USA, 1959)
  • and The Oscars® Experience, an immersive simulation that lets visitors imaginatively step onto the stage of the Dolby Theatre to accept an Academy Award®.

The museum’s roster of screenings—including Oscar® Sundays and Family Matinees—will be presented in its new 1,000-seat David Geffen Theater and the 288-seat Ted Mann Theater beginning on September 30 with a special presentation of The Wizard of Oz (USA, 1939) with live musical accompaniment by the American Youth Symphony conducted by Oscar nominee David Newman in the larger theater. Highlights of the first three months of film screenings, discussions, and programs include:

  • Stories of Cinema: screenings of films highlighted in the core exhibition, including Real Women Have Curves (USA, 2002) and The Way of the Dragon (Hong Kong, 1972)
  • Malcolm X in 70mm: a screening for Academy Museum Members with special guests Spike Lee and Denzel Washington
  • Oscar® Frights: screenings of Oscar-winning and Oscar-nominated horror films, including Get Out (USA, 2017), Pan’s Labyrinth (Mexico, 2006) and Psycho (USA, 1960)
  • Hayao Miyazakiscreenings of the filmmaker’s complete body of work, in conjunction with the inaugural temporary exhibition
  • Imperfect Journey: Haile Gerima and His Comrades: screenings in honor of Haile Gerima with special guests including Malik Sayeed, Bradford Young, Arthur Jafa, and Ava DuVernay
  • Sound Off: A Celebration of Women Composers: screenings of films scored by women composers, including Joker (USA, 2019), scored by Hildur Guðnadóttir, and Tron (USA, 1982), scored by Wendy Carlos
  • Retrospectives of Jane Campion and Satyajit Ray, with the latter drawing from the Academy Film Archive’s rich holdings of his works
  • Beyond the Icon: Anna May Wonga celebration of the actress’s work and legacy, including screenings of Piccadilly (UK, 1929) and Shanghai Express (USA, 1932)
  • Legacy: a cross-generational discussion series, beginning with a conversation between Laura Dern and her parents Bruce Dern and Diane Ladd
  • In Conversation: a topical discussion series that begins with a conversation between producers Effie T. Brown and Heather Rae on how to contextualize cinema

Ongoing education and family programs will take place throughout the museum in exhibition galleries, theaters, and the Shirley Temple Education Studio. These will include teen programs, family studio activities, and school tours. Accommodative tours for members of the hard-of-hearing and deaf communities and low-vision and blind communities will be offered monthly, as well as accommodative family film screenings for neurodivergent viewers.

Fanny’s, the restaurant and café developed by restaurateurs Bill Chait and Carl Schuster and designed by LA-based Commune Design, will open to visitors with breakfast and lunch service with dinner service added later in the fall. Named after Fanny Brice—the legendary movie, vaudeville, theater, and radio star portrayed by Barbra Streisand in her Oscar-winning role as Funny Girl (1968)—the striking two-story, 10,000 square foot space, conceptualized by the late architect Osvaldo Maiozzi, features a chef-designed open kitchen, elegant bar, and captain-based service style that nods to a bygone era. Raphael Francois serves as Executive Chef and Julian Cox as the bar’s mixologist. Wolfgang Puck Catering will oversee catering services at the museum.

The Academy Museum Storewill greet shoppers in its 2,600-square-foot retail space off of the Sidney Poitier Grand Lobby and will feature merchandise designed and produced exclusively for the store, Oscars memorabilia, and other film-related items. An extension of the museum’s mission to showcase the diverse stories of the art and artists of moviemaking, the museum is thrilled to work with many diverse and inspiring Los Angeles and California-based partners on the creation of merchandise and collectibles.

Civic Dedication and Opening Events
The civic dedication ceremony for the Academy Museum will be held at 9am on Thursday, September 30, on The Walt Disney Company Piazza, before an audience of invited guests and media. Following a Tongva land acknowledgment, the program will include remarks by Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences CEO Dawn Hudson and President David Rubin; producer Effie T. Brown, chair of the museum’s Inclusion Advisory Committee and CEO of Gamechanger Films; Colleen Bell, Director of the California Film Commission; Los Angeles County Supervisor, Third District, Sheila Kuehl; Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti; and Los Angeles Councilmember, District 4, Nithya Raman; with Academy Museum Director and President Bill Kramer as master of ceremonies. Guests will include leadership and staff of the Academy and the Academy Museum, Museum Trustees, major donors to the museum campaign, executive leaders of neighboring cultural institutions, and representatives of community organizations. Following a ceremonial ribbon cutting, the museum will open its doors to the public at 10am.

The civic dedication will cap off a week of special events, which will begin with the Opening Gala on Saturday, September 25. Co-chaired by Jason Blum, Ava DuVernay, and Ryan Murphy, the Gala will honor writer-producer-director Haile Gerima and actress Sophia Loren and give special recognition to Academy Museum campaign leaders Bob Iger, Annette Bening, and Tom Hanks. The Gala will be presented by Rolex, with leadership support from J.P. Morgan.

The Gala will be followed by four days of museum member previews, September 26–29. On Tuesday, September 28, an Opening Night will greet museum Trustees, Academy Governors, major campaign donors, exhibition collaborators and lenders, and other contributors who have made the Academy Museum a reality. On Wednesday, September 29, a Premiere Party will welcome filmmakers, artists, musicians, designers, and other members of the creative community to the Academy Museum.

Opening festivities will conclude on Sunday, October 17, when the Academy Museum will host a day-long free community celebration, from 10 am–6 pm.

Inaugural Exhibitions
The Academy Museum’s 50,000 square feet of gallery space opens with a series of exhibitions that honor the museum’s mission to share the diverse and dynamic history of cinema with the world. This includes the three-floor core exhibition Stories of Cinema,the first-ever Hayao Miyazaki retrospective in North America, and many other engaging temporary exhibitions that exemplify the Academy Museum’s commitment to advancing the understanding, celebration, and preservation of cinema.

Stories of Cinemathe Academy Museum’s core exhibition, connects museumgoers to the celebratory and complex international history of motion pictures. The more than 30,000-square-foot exhibition, designed by WHY Architecture, explores all aspects of the history, arts, and sciences of moviemaking and is on view across three floors of the museum. Drawing from the Academy Museum’s growing collection as well as the unparalleled collections of the Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences, the exhibition will surround visitors with moving images, sound, props, costumes, scripts, posters, production and costume design drawings, matte paintings, photographs, backdrops, animation cels, puppets, maquettes, and so much more.

With the conviction that there is no single narrative encompassing the development of cinema, this exhibition will showcase multiple stories about moviemaking from a variety of voices and perspectives. Like cinema itself, the Stories of Cinema galleries will evolve and change over time to highlight different movies, artists, eras, genres, and more. Alongside celebrating and championing the stories, art, and artists of cinema, Stories of Cinema also creates space to tell its complex and difficult stories.

Stories of Cinema begins in the Sidney Poitier Grand Lobby with an installation in the glass-walled Spielberg Family Gallery. This installation, which is a free introduction to the exhibition, will provide a rapid immersion into the history of cinema via a 13-minute introductory presentation across multiple screens, juxtaposing clips and stills from 700 films spanning works from the Lumière brothers to present day. 

Stories of Cinema continues in the Wanda Gallery on the museum’s second floor with an entry gallery featuring floor-to-ceiling projections of clips from films presented in the galleries beyond. Visitors move into the Significant Movies and Moviemakers gallery where six vignettes will showcase elements from, and the legacies of, films like Citizen Kane (1941) and Real Women Have Curves (2002), as well as movie artists Thelma Schoonmaker, Bruce Lee, Emmanuel “Chivo” Lubezki, and Oscar Micheaux.  

TheAcademy Awards Historygalleries begin in a circular gallery set within the second floor of the Saban Building’s iconic gold cylinder and highlights the Oscar trophies from 20 historic Oscar wins, beginning with Best Cinematography for Sunrise: A Song of Two Humans (1927) and ending with Barry Jenkins’s Best Screenplay win for Moonlight (2016). Visitors then move into a larger gallery containing a chronological walk-through of Academy Awards history from 1929 to the present, an overview of the origins of the Oscars and the Academy, memorable wins and infamous snubs, Oscars fashion, and wraparound screens showcasing significant acceptance speeches.

For the inaugural exhibition, the Director’s Inspirationgallery featuresSpike Lee, and draws from the Academy Award-winning director’s personal collection of objects, such as a guitar owned by Prince, with whom he collaborated. Informed by Spike Lee’s own account of the creative process, the gallery considers his body of work and the inspiration behind some of his most iconic titles, as well as recurring themes and collaborators.

Next, visitors will move into a space honoring the mechanics and conceptualization of a movie’s narrative, the Story gallery, which features screenplays and storyboards from seminal films including Double Indemnity (1944), Pariah (2011), Psycho (1960), and When Harry Met Sally (1989). For the opening, The Art of Moviemaking gallery will present The Wizard of Oz (1939), going behind-the-scenes to explore the many disciplines that come together to bring a single film to life—screenwriting, casting, makeup design, costume design, production design, sound design, special effects, acting, directing, producing, and more. 

Adjacent to The Art of Moviemakingare a series of galleries dedicated to components of film artistry: the Performance gallery, exploring casting and acting through screen tests, audition tapes, and casting cards; theImage gallery, a screening room featuring a montage of interviews with cinematographers, location managers, and production designers; the Sound gallery, a screening room that explores components and layers of sound design using a case study, developed by Academy Award-winning sound designer Ben Burtt, of a scene from Raiders of the Lost Ark (1981); and the Identitygallery, which dives into the history and impact of costume, hair, and makeup artistry.

Within the Identity gallery are more than forty costumes and costume design sketches on view representing a wide swath of film history from the last century, including Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (1953) and The Wiz (1978). In addition, there is a display highlighting a single costume designer, which opens with costumes designed by Mary Zophres.

In the makeup and hairstyling section of Identity, visitors will see Rick Baker’s King Kong (1976) skin test; a section on Charlize Theron’s transformations in Monster (2003), Mad Max: Fury Road (2015), and Bombshell (2019); plaster life casts for Grace Kelly, Clark Gable, Mel Brooks, and Don Cheadle; makeup charts and cards for Kirk Douglas, Marilyn Monroe, Sessue Hayakawa, and Whitney Houston; continuity references for Frida (2002) and The Joy Luck Club (1993); and a case study on Dolemite is My Name (2019). The Identity gallery will also explore examples of how hair and makeup have been used to perpetuate racial stereotypes in film.

The final gallery in the second-floor installation is Impact/Reflection, an exploration of how documentary and narrative film can ignite cultural change, structured around these four social impact areas for the opening rotation: Black Lives Matter, #MeToo, labor relations, and climate change. 

Stories of Cinema continues on the third floor in the Rolex Gallery with an installation space cocurated by a revolving roster of international film artists, beginning withInstallation: Pedro Almodóvar. The gallery features 12 screens, each featuring a significant theme or scene found within the Academy Award-winning director’s body of work. 

Inventing Worlds & Characters spans three-galleries: Animation, Effects and Encounters. The Animation gallery explores hand-drawn, stop-motion, and digital animation, and celebrates the accomplishments of the artists behind some of the world’s most beloved animated movies, including Lotte Reiniger, Tyrus Wong, Katsuhiro Ôtomo, and Pete Docter. The Effects gallery will focus on influential special effects creators the likes of Georges Méliès and will spotlight significant special and visual effects moments in movies, including Terminator 2: Judgment Day (1991) and Avatar (2009). The Encounters gallery looks at the artistry that brings the worlds of sci-fi, fantasy, and horror to life, featuring original set pieces, costumes, and iconic characters including C-3PO, E.T., Okoye, and Edward Scissorhands. Connected to Encounters is Behold, an original installation by Academy Award-winning sound designer Ben Burtt. This 320-degree experience presented in a cylindrical screening room chronicles the evolution of outer space and futurism in film.  

For the opening, the Composersound chamber gallery which will be dedicated to the work of a single film music composer will feature a collaboration with Academy Award-winning composer Hildur Guðnadóttir and new music specially created for the space. 

As visitors exit Stories of Cinema, they will be surrounded by thoughts from the film community that contemplate The Future of Cinema.

The Academy Museum’s inaugural temporary exhibition, Hayao Miyazaki, marks the first museum retrospective in North America dedicated to the acclaimed artist and his work. On view in the museum’s Marilyn and Jeffrey Katzenberg Gallery, the exhibition features approximately 400 objects from each of Miyazaki’s animated feature films, including My Neighbor Totoro (1988) and the Academy Award-winning Spirited Away (2001). Visitors will travel through the filmmaker’s six-decade career via a dynamic presentation of original imageboards, character designs, storyboards, layouts, backgrounds, posters, and cels, including pieces on public view outside of Japan for the first time, as well as large-scale projections of film clips and immersive environments. 

Thematically organized in seven sections, the exhibition is designed as a journey. To enter, visitors follow four-year-old Mei, a character from My Neighbor Totoro, into the Tree Tunnel gallery, a transitional space that leads into Miyazaki’s enchanted worldsOnce inside, visitors will enter the Creating Characters gallery and meet Miyazaki’s protagonists―many of them female―and explore how they were developed from concept to creation. Visitors will then learn more about Miyazaki’s early works as an animator in the Making Of gallery, in addition to his long-term collaboration with the late Isao Takahata, with whom he founded Studio Ghibli. A special section on the Making of Nausicaä of the Valley of the Wind (1984)explores Miyazaki’s unique process to create films. 

Deeper into the exhibition, the Creating Worlds gallery will capture the contrast between Miyazaki’s depictions of peaceful natural environments as well as the industrial settings dominated by labor and technology that are also often featured in his movies. Visitors can view imageboards and backgrounds that offer insight into Miyazaki’s imagination and explore his fascination with complex vertical structures, such as the famous bathhouse in Spirited Away, and the underwater world of Ponyo (2008), as well as Miyazaki’s interest in flying, as seen in Porco Rosso (1992) and The Wind Rises (2013). As a highlight of the exhibition, visitors can enjoy a moment of quiet contemplation in the Sky View installation, addressing another frequent motif in Miyazaki’s filmsthe desire to reflect and dream. Visitors then enter the Transformations gallery, a moving image driven experience which introduces some of the more challenging subject matters recurring in his films such as war and pollution, before entering the immersive Magical Forestwith its Mother Tree installation. Standing at the threshold between dream and reality, colossal, mystical trees in many of Miyazaki’s films represent a connection or gateway to another world. In the forest, visitors will discover spirits appearing and disappearing and be able to read some of Miyazaki’s poetry. And finally, the exhibition concludes with Spirited Away’s Exit Portal through which visitors―accompanied by Chihiro’s footsteps—will leave the exhibition to return to the real world.

Accompanying Hayao Miyazaki will be a 288-page richly illustrated catalogue published by the Academy Museum and DelMonico Books and distributed worldwide by D.A.P. Artbook. It includes a foreword by Toshio Suzuki, essays by Pete Docter, Daniel Kothenschulte, and Jessica Niebel, and the artist’s filmography. For the length of its run, the exhibition will be supported by public programs, unique Studio Ghibli merchandise for sale at the Academy Museum Store, and film screenings in both English and Japanese in the museum’s state-of-the-art theaters.

In dialogue with the Hayao Miyazaki exhibition, the museum has installed The Pixar Toy Story 3D Zoetrope in the adjacent Warner Brothers Gallery on the fourth floor. Inspired by a similar apparatus made by Studio Ghibli, in the mid-2000s, Pixar built a giant zoetrope that featured beloved characters from the Toy Story (1995)film. They began by mounting 214 Toy Story  maquettes, each posed in a sequence of postures, on a turntable. As the table turns and strobe lights flash, the characters come to life: Woody and his horse Bullseye buck past in one direction; Buzz rolls by on a Pixar ball in the other; Jesse the cowgirl, from Toy Story 2, dances inside a lasso; and army men parachute from the sky as three-eyed aliens wave and play.  

The Path to Cinema: Highlights from the Richard Balzer Collection is located in the LAIKA Gallery on the third floor. The exhibition of what is widely considered to be the world’s foremost collection of pre-cinematic optical toys and devices, it will explore the long history of visual entertainment that led to the invention of cinema, from shadow play, peep shows, magic lanterns, zoetropes, and praxinoscopes, to the Cinématographe Lumière, the world’s first successful film projector. Visitors to this exhibition will experience these marvelous inventions firsthand and take in the wonders of a magic lantern show created specifically for this exhibition.

The dramatic, 34-foot double-height Hurd Gallery will debut the exhibition Backdrop: An Invisible Art, which introduces visitors to the history of the Hollywood backdrop and spotlights a monumental backdrop painting—the iconic Mt. Rushmore backing from Alfred Hitchcock’s North by Northwest (1959)—considering both its artistry and its contested imagery.  The backdrop was created by scenic artists George Gibson, Ben Carré, Wayne Hill, Clark Provins, Harry Tepker, Al Londraville, and Duncan Spencer in 1958, and was stored for many decades at J.C. Backings Corporation before it was gifted to the Academy Museum.

Finally, The Oscars® Experience in the East West Gallery creates an immersive environment to simulate the thrilling experience of walking onto the stage at Hollywood’s Dolby Theatre to accept an Oscar.

Architectural Design
Designed by Pritzker Prize-winning architect Renzo Pianoand Renzo Piano Building Workshop in collaboration with Gensler as executive architect, the 300,000-square-foot Academy Museum at Wilshire Boulevard and Fairfax Avenue combines two contrasting structures: the renovated and expanded May Company building, a 1939 Streamline Moderne landmark now renamed the Saban Building in honor of benefactors Cheryl and Haim Saban, and a soaring new glass-and-concrete spherical building.

The 250,000-square-foot Saban Building houses the Fairfax Avenue entrance and Sidney Poitier Grand Lobby, the museum’s exhibition galleries, the 288-seat Ted Mann Theater, Shirley Temple Education Studio, Debbie Reynolds Conservation Studio, Fanny’s restaurant and café, and the Academy Museum Store. The 45,000-square-foot sphere building houses the 1,000-seat David Geffen Theater and the Dolby Family Terrace.

Visitors may access the Sphere Building from the Saban Building via the Casey Wasserman Bridge at mezzanine level which crosses over to the David Geffen Theater and the Barbra Streisand Bridge on the fifth floor which crosses over to the Dolby Family Terrace. Standing outside the northern entrance to the museum, at the base of the sphere, is The Walt Disney Company Piazza. The piazza is enlivened with landscaping designed by artist Robert Irwin and features dwarf southern magnolia trees and karo shrubs, California fan palms, vinca minor, Mexican fan palms, and jacaranda trees.

The Academy Museum’s building has been awarded LEED Gold certification by the U.S. Green Building Council.

Curatorial Team and Credits
Stories of Cinema is organized by Academy Museum of Motion Pictures Director and President Bill Kramer, Senior Director of Curatorial Affairs Doris Berger, Exhibitions Curator Jenny He, and Assistant Curators J. Raúl Guzmán, Dara Jaffe, Ana Santiago, and Sophia Serrano, with support from Research Assistants Esme Douglas and Manouchka Labouba, the Academy Museum Inclusion Advisory Committee, and the Academy Branch Task Forces. The exhibition is presented by PWC. Major funding is provided by Gerald Schwartz and Heather Reisman. Generous support provided by Metro Goldwyn Mayer, Ruderman Family Foundation, FotoKem, Barbara Roisman Cooper and Martin M. Cooper, Jocelyn R. Katz, John Ptak and Margaret Black, Lauren Shuler Donner, Randy E. Haberkamp, Kevin McCormick and A. Scott Berg, and John and Lacey Williams. Technology solutions are generously provided by Panasonic and Sony Electronics Inc. Stories of Cinema is powered by Dolby. Academy Museum digital engagement platform sponsored by Bloomberg Philanthropies. 

Hayao Miyazaki is presented by the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures in collaboration with Studio Ghibli. It is organized by Academy Museum of Motion Pictures Exhibition Curator Jessica Niebel and Assistant Curator J. Raúl Guzmán. Technology solutions generously provided by Christie®, and major support comes from the Arthur and Gwen Hiller Memorial Fund. This exhibition also is supported, in part, by the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors through the Los Angeles County Department of Arts and Culture. In-kind airfare provided by All Nippon Airways. Special thanks to the Japan Foundation for their partnership.

Academy Museum film programs are organized by Bernardo Rondeau, Associate Curator and Head of Film Programs, and Robert Reneau, Film Program Coordinator. Education and Public Programs are led by Amy Homma, Director of Education and Public Programs; Eduardo Sanchez, Manager of Public Programs; and Julia Velasquez, Manager of Youth Programs. Gary Dauphin is Associate Curator of Digital Presentations, and Shari Frilot is guest curator for new technology and expanded cinema.

The Path to Cinema: Highlights from the Richard Balzer Collection is organized by Academy Museum of Motion Pictures Exhibitions Curator Jessica Niebel and Assistant Curator Ana Santiago. The Richard Balzer Collection is a gift to the Academy Museum and the Margaret Herrick Library from Patricia Bellinger Balzer.

Backdrop: An Invisible Art is organized by Senior Director of Curatorial Affairs Doris Berger and Collections Curator Nathalie Morris with support from advisors Cecelia Fire Thunder, Karen L. Maness, John Pohl, Tom Walsh, and Robert M. Yellow Hair.

The Oscars® Experience is powered by Dolby.

Support for the Academy Museum
The Academy Museum launched its pre-opening campaign in 2012 and in November 2020 announced that it had exceeded the goal of $388 million.

Individuals, corporations, and foundations  that have made leadership gifts include Cheryl and Haim Saban (Saban Building), David Geffen Foundation (David Geffen Theater), Rolex (Rolex Gallery), Dalian Wanda Group (the Wanda Gallery), Hobson/Lucas Family Foundation in honor of Sid Ganis, Dolby Laboratories/Family of Ray Dolby (Dolby Family Terrace), The Walt Disney Company (Walt Disney Company Piazza), Marilyn and Jeffrey Katzenberg (Marilyn and Jeffrey Katzenberg Gallery), Steven Spielberg (Spielberg Family Gallery), Patricia Bellinger Balzer, Shirley Temple Black and Family (Shirley Temple Education Studio), East West Bank (East West Bank Gallery), Gale Anne Hurd (Hurd Gallery), Bob Iger and Willow Bay (Bob Iger and Willow Bay Terrace), LAIKA (LAIKA Gallery), Metro Goldwyn Mayer Studios, NBCUniversal, Netflix (Netflix Terrace), Participant, Cecilia DeMille Presley (Cecil B. DeMille Founders Room), PwC (for Stories of Cinema), Richard Roth, Gerald Schwartz and Heather Reisman (Gerald Schwartz and Heather Reisman Terrace), The Simms/Mann Family Foundation (Ted Mann Theater), Jeff Skoll, Wendy Stark of The Fran and Ray Stark Foundation, Barbra Streisand (Barbra Streisand Bridge), Steve Tisch (Steve Tisch Terrace), Warner Bros. (Warner Bros. Gallery), Wasserman Foundation (Wasserman Bridge), and Wolfgang Puck Catering. The Academy Museum’s digital engagement platform is sponsored by Bloomberg Philanthropies.  

Donors to the Pillar Campaign, co-chaired by museum trustees Laura Dern and Kimberly Steward, which names the support columns in the Saban Building, include the William Anderson Family; Tom Hanks and Rita Wilson; Bob Iger and Willow Bay; Barbra Streisand; the Ron Meyer Family; Kimberly Steward, in honor of Hattie McDaniel; NBCUniversal; the Diller-von Furstenberg Family Foundation; AMBI; Lionsgate; MGM; Panavision; Paramount Pictures Corporation; Sony Pictures Entertainment; 20th Century Fox; Viacom; Lauren and Jason Blum; Participant Media, from Jeff Skoll; Christopher Nolan and Emma Thomas, through the Morf Foundation; the Katie McGrath and J.J. Abrams Family Foundation; Cinépolis; Lexus; Gaumont; Sophia Loren (funded by Regina Scully); Alice Guy-Blaché (funded by Impact Partners); Julia and Ken Gouw, in honor of Miyoshi Umeki; and the Oneida Indian Nation, New York, in honor of Native American musician and advocate Buffy Sainte-Marie.

A post-opening campaign to raise new endowment, programming, operating, and capital funds is being planned.

Visiting the Academy Museum
Tickets to the Academy Museum are available only through advance online reservations via the Academy Museum’s website and mobile app.  General admission tickets for the Museum’s exhibitions are $25 for adults, $19 for seniors (age 62+), and $15 for students. Admission for visitors ages 17 and younger and California residents with an EBT card is free. Advance timed entrance for the The Oscars® Experience is available to general admission visitors via a separate $15 ticket. A general admission ticket is required to access The Oscars® Experience.

The Academy Museum’s inaugural public programs and film screening series will also be available for registration via the app. Tickets for film screenings and public programs are sold separately and do not require general admission to the museum. Tickets will be available only through advance online reservations via the Academy Museum’s website. Film screening tickets are $10 for adults, $7 for seniors (age 62+), $5 for college students, $5 for children (age 17 and younger), and $8 for Museum Members. Public and education program tickets range from free with admission to $20 for adults.

About the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures 
The Academy Museum is the largest institution in the United States devoted to the arts, sciences, and artists of moviemaking. The museum advances the understanding, celebration, and preservation of cinema through inclusive and accessible exhibitions, screenings, programs, initiatives, and collections. Designed by Pritzker Prize-winning architect Renzo Piano, the museum’s campus contains the restored and revitalized historic Saban Building—formerly known as the May Company building (1939)—and a soaring spherical addition. Together, these buildings contain 50,000 square feet of exhibition spaces, two state-of-the-art theaters, an education studio, restaurant, retail store, and beautiful public spaces. The museum opens to the public on September 30, 2021.

Academy Museum Dedicates Grand Lobby To Film Legend Sir Sidney L. Poitier.

Los Angeles, August 30, 2021 – Bill Kramer, Director and President of the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures, today announced that the new museum, opening in Los Angeles on September 30, is naming its 10,000-square-foot lobby in honor of the legendary actor, film director, producer, and humanitarian Sir Sidney L. Poitier. The naming of the Sidney Poitier Grand Lobby was made possible through a campaign supported by Ambassador Nicole Avant and Co-CEO of Netflix and Chair of the Academy Museum Board of Trustees Ted Sarandos, the Perenchio Foundation, Tyler Perry, and Oprah Winfrey, with major gifts from Patrick and Michele Soon-Shiong, among additional donors.

“It is an incredible honor to name our grand lobby—the nucleus of the Academy Museum—in celebration of Sir Sidney Poitier, whose legacy of humanitarian efforts and groundbreaking artistry continues to inspire us all,” said Bill Kramer. “We are deeply thankful to everyone who supported this campaign, and to Sidney, his wife Joanna Shimkus Poitier, and their entire family for allowing us this great privilege.”

Joanna Shimkus Poitier said, “Sidney’s tremendous impact on the motion picture industry, and on audiences around the world, is inseparable from the story of his longstanding, collegial relationship with the Academy. Sidney has always taken great pride in the Academy’s recognition of his work. To be honored now as the namesake of the Academy Museum’s lobby, the place of access to everything that lies within, is almost like receiving a second Oscar® for lifetime achievement.”

Sir Sidney Poitier made his screen debut in the 1950 film No Way Out, an American film noir which was among the first Hollywood movies to directly address the subject of racism. Poitier went on to become a celebrated actor known for his roles in The Defiant Ones (1958, which earned him his first Oscar nomination), Porgy and Bess (1959), A Raisin in the Sun (1961), A Patch of Blue (1965), In the Heat of the Night (1967), To Sir, with Love (1967) and Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner (1967). He has also directed nine feature films.

Among the many honors and awards for his work, Poitier won an Academy Award® for Best Actor for Lilies of the Field (1963), becoming the first Black winner of a Best Actor Oscar. In 2001 he received an Academy Honorary Award, presented by Denzel Washington, “in recognition of his remarkable accomplishments as an artist and as a human being.” In 1974, Queen Elizabeth II named Poitier an honorary Knight Commander of the Order of the British Empire. In 1995 he received a Kennedy Center Honor and in 2009 was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom by President Barack Obama. Poitier’s Best Actor Oscar as well as his acceptance speech are featured in the Academy Museum’s core exhibition, Stories of Cinema.

Designed by Pritzker Prize-winning architect Renzo Piano, the Poitier Lobby occupies the entire first floor of the restored and revitalized landmark Saban Building—formerly known as the May Company building (1939)—from Wilshire Boulevard at the South to the dramatic Walt Disney Company Piazza at the North. With its 24-foot ceilings and open, modern design, the Poitier Lobby serves as the heart for all museum activities. From this central hub, visitors can move to the galleries and theaters, stop for a drink or a meal at Fanny’s, or enjoy shopping at the Academy Museum Store. The Museum’s core exhibition Stories of Cinema, which stretches across three floors of the Saban Building, begins on the ground floor in the Poitier Lobby’s soaring Spielberg Family Gallery, which is always open to the public free of charge. Within the Spielberg Family Gallery visitors can stroll through a rapid immersion into the history of film, as seen through images playing on multiple hanging screens.
 
About the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures 
The Academy Museum is the largest institution in the United States devoted to the arts, sciences, and artists of moviemaking. The museum advances the understanding, celebration, and preservation of cinema through inclusive and accessible exhibitions, screenings, programs, initiatives, and collections. Designed by Pritzker Prize-winning architect Renzo Piano, the museum’s campus contains the restored and revitalized historic Saban Building—formerly known as the May Company building (1939)—and a soaring spherical addition. Together, these buildings contain 50,000 square feet of exhibition spaces, two state-of-the-art theaters, an education studio, restaurant, retail store, and beautiful public spaces. The museum opens to the public on September 30, 2021.

ACADEMY BOARD OF GOVERNORS 2021-2022 OFFICERS ELECTED, DAVID RUBIN RE-ELECTED ACADEMY PRESIDENT.

LOS ANGELES, CA – Casting director David Rubin was re-elected president of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences by the organization’s Board of Governors.

Also elected to officer positions by the Board:

• DeVon Franklin, Vice President (chair, Equity and Inclusion Committee)
• Donna Gigliotti, Vice President/Secretary (chair, Governance Committee)
• Larry Karaszewski, Vice President (chair, History and Preservation Committee)
• David Linde, Vice President/Treasurer (chair, Finance Committee)
• Isis Mussenden, Vice President (chair, Museum Committee)
• Wynn P. Thomas, Vice President (chair, Education and Outreach Committee)
• Jennifer Todd, Vice President (chair, Awards Committee)
• Janet Yang, Vice President (chair, Membership Committee)

Rubin is beginning his third term as president and his ninth year as a governor representing the Casting Directors Branch.  Karaszewski, Mussenden, Thomas and Yang were re-elected as officers.  This will be the first officer stint for Franklin, Gigliotti, Linde and Todd.

With more than 100 film and television credits, Rubin has cast such features as “The English Patient,” “Men in Black,” “Hairspray,” “Lars and the Real Girl,” “The Talented Mr. Ripley,” “Four Weddings and a Funeral,” “Get Shorty,” “My Best Friend’s Wedding,” “William Shakespeare’s Romeo + Juliet,” “Spaceballs,” “Fried Green Tomatoes” and “The Firm.”

Academy board members may serve up to two three-year terms, followed by at least a two-year hiatus, after which they may serve up to two additional three-year terms.  Officers serve one-year terms, with a maximum of four consecutive years in any one office.

The number of officer positions increased to nine this year with the addition of the Equity and Inclusion Committee and the separation of Membership and Governance into two committees.

For a full listing of the Academy’s 2021-2022 Board of Governors, click here

BOARD OF GOVERNORS

The Board of Governors directs the Academy’s strategic vision, preserves the organization’s financial health and assures the fulfillment of its mission.

Governors attend 6-8 board meetings annually (in person or by video conference when out of town). Each Governor also serves on one board oversight committee and their branch’s executive committee, and they are expected to represent their branch at numerous Academy events through the year.

Governors have fiduciary responsibilities imposed by state law to serve the Academy’s best interests, by acting with responsibility and care when approving annual goals presented by management, as well as major policies concerning governance.

CEO Dawn Hudson oversees a staff of more than 400 who conduct the Academy’s day-to-day business.

OFFICERS 2021 – 2022

David Rubin

PRESIDENT – DAVID RUBIN – Mr. Rubin’s career as a casting director includes more than 90 motion pictures, including “The English Patient,” “Men in Black,” “The Talented Mr. Ripley,” and “Lars and the Real Girl.” In 2002, he received the Casting Society of America’s Hoyt Bowers Award for outstanding contribution to the casting profession. Mr. Rubin is a governor of the Casting Directors Branch.

Donna Gigliotti

VICE PRESIDENT / SECRETARY – DONNA GIGLIOTTI – Ms. Gigliotti is one of only nine women to win an Academy Award for Best Picture. She received the 1998 Oscar for producing “Shakespeare In Love.” She received three additional Academy Award nominations for Best Picture: “Hidden Figures” (2016), “Silver Linings Playbook” (2013), and “The Reader”(2008). She is President of Tempesta Films, a film production company based in New York. Ms. Gigliotti is a governor of the Executives Branch.

David Linde

VICE PRESIDENT / TREASURER – DAVID LINDE – Mr. Linde is Chief Executive Officer at Participant. He has held executive, founder, and producer roles at Lava Bear Films, Universal Pictures, Focus Features, and Good Machine. He also received an Oscar nomination for Best Picture for “Arrival” in 2017. Mr. Linde is a governor of the Executives Branch.

DEVON FRANKLIN

VICE PRESIDENT – DEVON FRANKLIN – Mr. Franklin, a member of the Executives Branch, is the former SVP of Production for Columbia Pictures Entertainment and now runs his own production company, Franklin Entertainment. He has produced the hit films “Breakthrough,” “The Star,” and “Miracles from Heaven.” He is also a New York Times bestselling author and minister. Mr. Franklin is a Governor-at-Large.

Larry Karaszewski

VICE PRESIDENT – LARRY KARASZEWSKI – Mr. Karaszewski is best known for unusual true stories written in tandem with Scott Alexander. Their feature film credits include the Oscar-winning “Ed Wood,” “The People vs. Larry Flynt,” “Man on the Moon,” “Big Eyes,” and “Dolemite is My Name.” Mr. Karaszewski is co-chair of the International Feature Film category. He won the Emmy, Golden Globe, PGA and WGA Award for “The People v O.J. Simpson: American Crime Story.” Mr. Karaszewski is a governor of the Writers Branch.

VICE PRESIDENT – ISIS MUSSENDEN – Ms. Mussenden’s credits include “The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and The Wardrobe” (and two additional sequels), “American Psycho,” and “The Wolverine.” In addition, she was the first costume designer to receive costume-design credit for animation: “Shrek,” “Shrek 2,” and “Puss in Boots.” Ms. Mussenden is a governor of the Costume Designers Branch.

Wynn P. Thomas

VICE PRESIDENT – WYNN P. THOMAS – Mr. Thomas’ credits include “Hidden Figures,” “A Beautiful Mind,” “Cinderella Man,” “Mars Attacks!,” “Malcolm X,” and “Do the Right Thing.” Mr. Thomas is a governor of the Production Design Branch.

Jennifer Todd

VICE PRESIDENT – JENNIFER TODD – Ms. Todd produced the double Oscar-winning film “Alice in Wonderland” and the Oscar-nominated films “Memento” and “Across the Universe.” She recently produced the Emmy-nominated 89th and 90th Annual Academy Awards. Ms. Todd is a governor of the Producers Branch.

Janet Yang

VICE PRESIDENT – JANET YANG – Ms. Yang, a member of the Producers Branch, began her career in China in distribution. Her extensive film and TV producing credits include “The Joy Luck Club,” “The People vs. Larry Flynt,” “Shanghai Calling,” “High Crimes,” “Dark Matter,” “Zero Effect,” and the Oscar-nominated animated film, “Over the Moon.” She won an Emmy for the HBO film, “Indictment: The McMartin Trial.” Ms. Yang is a Governor-at-Large.

Dawn Hudson

CEO – DAWN HUDSONPrior to becoming the Academy’s CEO in 2011, Ms. Hudson was the Executive Director of Film Independent, which grew from a small non-profit into a nationally recognized arts institution under her leadership.  She has worked in the arts for more than 25 years.

For a full listing of the Academy’s 2021-2022 Board of Governors, click here.  

ABOUT THE ACADEMY
The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences is a global community of more than 10,000 of the most accomplished artists, filmmakers and executives working in film. In addition to celebrating and recognizing excellence in filmmaking through the Oscars, the Academy supports a wide range of initiatives to promote the art and science of the movies, including public programming, educational outreach and the upcoming Academy Museum of Motion Pictures.

FOLLOW THE ACADEMY
www.oscars.org
www.facebook.com/TheAcademy
www.youtube.com/Oscars
www.twitter.com/TheAcademy
www.instagram.com/TheAcademy