Tag Archives: Academy Museum of Motion Pictures

Academy Museum Hosts Its First-Ever Oscars Viewing Party during the 94th Academy Awards.

Los Angeles, Calif. – On March 27, 2022, on the occasion of the 94th Academy Awards®, the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures hosted the inaugural Oscars Night at the Museum. More than 1,000 guests at the sold-out event experienced some of the excitement of the awards pre-show as they walked the red carpet in their most creative and glamorous black-tie looks.

Throughout the evening attendees captured the evening in photo booths featuring a 360° slow motion camera and a photo mosaic wall; enjoyed sets from DJs Mamabear and Lady C courtesy of dublab; explored the museum’s 50,000 square feet of galleries; accepted their own award in The Oscars® Experience in the East West Bank Gallery; and had an opportunity to shop for exclusive merchandise at the Academy Museum Store.

The energy of the live broadcast was telecast in the museum’s state of the art David Geffen Theater, hosted by TCM’s Dave Karger with emcees, Chris and Vanessa Spencer, Tom Lenk, D’Lo, and Jesus Trejo performing during commercial breaks. Guests enjoyed food from Wolfgang Puck Catering in the Sidney Poitier Grand Lobby in addition to offerings from local food vendors Vurger Guyz and Thai-Mex Cocina.

Las Fotos Project, a non-profit organization that seeks to elevate the voices of teenage girls and gender-expansive youth from communities of color through photography and mentoring, helped document the festivities.

About the Academy

The Academy Museum is the largest museum in the United States devoted to the arts, sciences, and artists of moviemaking. The museum advances the understanding, celebration, and preservation of cinema through inclusive and accessible exhibitions, screenings, programs, initiatives, and collections. Designed by Pritzker Prize-winning architect Renzo Piano, the museum’s campus contains the restored and revitalized historic Saban Building—formerly known as the May Company building (1939)—and a soaring spherical addition.

Together, these buildings contain 50,000 square feet of exhibition spaces, two state-of-the-art theaters, the Shirley Temple Education Studio, and beautiful public spaces that are free and open to the public. These include: The Walt Disney Company Piazza and the Sidney Poitier Grand Lobby, which houses the Spielberg Family Gallery, Academy Museum Store, and Fanny’s restaurant and café. The Academy Museum exhibition galleries are open seven days a week, with hours Sunday through Thursday from 10am to 6pm and Friday and Saturday from 10am to 8pm.

Academy Museum of Motion Pictures Announces New ExhibitionsScheduled for the 2022-2023 Season. Hollywoodland Will Become the Museum’s First Permanent Exhibition and Will Showcase the Founding and Founders of the Film Industry in Los Angeles.

Upcoming Exhibitions Will Include Galleries Devoted to The Godfather, Agnès Varda, BOYZ N THE HOOD, Lourdes Portillo, Casablanca, the history of Black Cinema from 1898–1971, and Sarah Greenwood and Katie Spencer.

Los Angeles, March 21, 2022The Academy Museum of Motion Pictures today announced the first round of exhibition rotations, which are scheduled for the 2022–2023 season. These rotations further the museum’s mission to advance the understanding, celebration, and preservation of cinema through dynamic and diverse exhibitions.

Beginning this summer, the Academy Museum will open the expansive exhibition Regeneration: Black Cinema 1898–1971which will explore the history of Black cinema, from its earliest days to just after the civil rights movement. In the fall, the museum will open galleries devoted to Francis Ford Coppola’s The Godfather (1972) and the influences of French filmmaker Agnès Varda. In early 2023, several new exhibitions will open, including spaces dedicated to BOYZ N THE HOOD(1991), Casablanca(1942), documentarian Lourdes Portillo, and the collaborative work of production designer Sarah Greenwood and set decorator Katie Spencer.

In late spring 2023, the Academy Museum will open its first permanent exhibition,Hollywoodland , chronicling the founding and the founders of the Hollywood studio system in Los Angeles. In addition, new objects, images, and interviews will be added to numerous galleries, including Gregory Peck’s Oscar for To Kill a Mockingbird (1962), storyboards and scripts from Hitchcock’s Rebecca (1940) and The Birds (1963), costumes designed by Travis Banton, Edith Head, and Ann Roth, and interviews with film editors Maysie Hoy, Carol Littleton, and Sam Pollard, among others.

Concurrently, the Academy Museum’s public spaces—the Sidney Poitier Grand Lobby, the Ted Mann Lobby, the Netflix Lounge, the Walt Disney Company Piazza, the Dolby Family Terrace, the Gerry Schwartz and Heather Reisman Mezzanine, and the spine of the museum—will be refreshed by Kulapat Yantrasast and WHY Architecture. Incorporating cinematic elements and moments of digital engagement and connectivity, these spaces will be designed to more deeply enhance the visitor experience.

Bill Kramer, Director and President of the Academy Museum, said, “The history of film is endlessly rich and varied, which is why we envisioned the exhibitions of the Academy Museum as a continually evolving set of installations and virtual content. We are delighted to present a new round of stories, explorations, moving images, props, and other objects that explore the many facets of moviemaking – from the founding of Hollywood to present day. These rotations give our visitors many wonderful reasons to come back, while offering an extraordinary invitation to others to engage with the museum.”

Jacqueline Stewart, Chief Artistic and Programming Officer of the Academy Museum, said, “In our core exhibition, we are excited to continue offering a multitude of perspectives on film and filmmaking, drawing on the unmatched resources of our collection. These new exhibitions contrast two different versions of a ‘classic’ film with Casablanca and BOYZ N THE HOOD.  They highlight different ways in which directors can inspire others with Coppola’s landmark The Godfather and the iconoclastic Agnès Varda. And they showcase two strikingly different approaches to the filmmaking process with the fierce independence of Lourdes Portillo and the deep collaboration of Sarah Greenwood and Katie Spencer. In addition, the epic exhibitionRegeneration: Black Cinema 1898–1971 will invite visitors to explore the broad range of Black participation in filmmaking dating back to the beginning of cinema, while Hollywoodland will help visitors better understand how and why Hollywood’s studio system was created here in Los Angeles.”

Information on upcoming exhibition rotations follow below.

REGENERATION: BLACK CINEMA 1898–1971
In August, the Academy Museum will open Regeneration: Black Cinema 1898–1971 —a research-driven, in-depth look at Black participation in American filmmaking. It will highlight the work of independent Black filmmakers from the dawn of cinema to the civil rights movement. The exhibition will elevate this underrepresented aspect of artistic production and present a more inclusive story about film history. Featured artists include Lena Horne, Sidney Poitier, Paul Robeson, William Greaves, Josephine Baker, the Nicholas Brothers, Harry Belafonte, Ruby Dee and Ossie Davis, and more. The exhibitionis co-organized by Doris Berger, Vice President of Curatorial Affairs for the Academy Museum and Rhea L. Combs, Director of Curatorial Affairs at the National Portrait Gallery. Additional details will be announced soon.

HOLLYWOODLAND
Opening in late Spring 2023,Hollywoodlandwill trace the history of filmmaking in Los Angeles back to its roots at the beginning of the 20th century, illustrating how and why the city became the world capital of cinema that it still is today. This immersive gallery will convey the evolving topography of Los Angeles along the timeline of the developing movie industry, allowing visitors to feel a tangible proximity to this rich history and encouraging further exploration of the city’s landmarks upon departing the Academy Museum. The exhibition will focus on the predominantly Jewish founders of the early Hollywood studio system, delving into how their personal narratives shaped the distinct characteristics of the movies their respective studios produced. It will foreground the ways in which the birth of the American film industry—and therefore the projected depiction of the American Dream—is truly an immigrant story.  In addition to highlighting the origins of the studios commonly known as “The Majors,” the exhibition will also explore the independent producers working in Hollywood in the early 1900s. Among these studios and producers, there are high-stakes stories of ingenuity that will engage visitors and offer a deeper understanding of Hollywood history. The exhibition is organized by Associate Curator Dara Jaffe in collaboration with Associate Curator of Digital Presentations Gary Dauphin.

STORIES OF CINEMA EXHIBITION ROTATIONS
Like cinema itself, thegalleries of the museum’s core exhibition Stories of Cinema will evolve and change over time to highlight different movies, artists, eras, genres, and more. Following are new rotations that will be presented in the 2022–2023 season in Stories of Cinema.

The Art of Moviemaking: The Godfather,will open on November 3, 2022 and will showcase the collaborative process of the making of this masterpiece through a wide array of original objects, images, and stories. In 1972, director Francis Ford Coppola’s interpretation of Mario Puzo’s popular novel provided an operatic and poignant reflection on the American Dream that not only radically transformed the moviegoing experience, but also the moviemaking process. Featured costumes, props, scripts, and equipment will highlight the contributions of each cinematic branch, exploring how they innovated amidst the limitations and freedoms of “New Hollywood.” Object highlights include Don Corleone’s desk and chair used in The GodfatherTrilogy, Coppola’s original “Godfather notebook,” and a costume worn by Al Pacino in The Godfather Part II. This exhibition is organized by Assistant Curator Sophia Serrano. Leading up to The Godfather gallery rotation, the Academy Museum Store will be releasing an exclusive limited-edition The Godfather LP in partnership with Amoeba Records. The album will feature music from The City of Prague Philharmonic Orchestra and will include music from the trilogy. Pre-order your copy today at academymuseumstore.org.

Also opening on November 3 is Director’s Inspiration: Agnès Varda. Rather than drawing inspiration from other filmmakers or films, Varda was influenced by her life, experiences, and the world around her. As a result, her work is undeniably personal. This gallery will highlight her influences and films from her six-decade long career ranging from La Pointe Courte (1955) to Varda by Agnès (2019). A photographer prior to becoming a filmmaker, the gallery will explore Varda’s time behind the still camera including prints, contact sheets, and photography related production materials. From her years living in Los Angeles to her familial relationships, the autobiographical elements that permeate all aspects of Varda’s filmography will be represented using personal postcards, props, family photographs, and other production materials. Additionally, Varda’s career as a fine artist and her longstanding love of art history which influenced many of her films will be explored using production notebooks, posters, and a model for one of her cinema shack installations. This exhibition is organized by Vice President of Curatorial Affairs Doris Berger and Assistant Curator Ana Santiago.

In February 2023, the Significant Movies and Moviemakersgallery will reopen with a four-gallery experience that will showcase the classic drama Casablanca(1942), the groundbreaking film BOYZ N THE HOOD (1991), the collaboration between production designer Sarah Greenwood and set decorator Katie Spencer, and documentarian Lourdes Portillo .

The museum’s celebration of Casablancawill feature original production objects highlighting beloved characters, settings, music, and the cinematic virtuosity that made the 1942 film one of Hollywood’s most enduring classics. The gallery will explore the influx of European émigrés who contributed their talents both in front of and behind the camera, echoing the narrative themes of the film itself. Though Casablanca is a timeless piece of cinema in its romance and artistry, it is also meaningfully and inextricably tied to the context of its war-time production during a refugee crisis—a context this gallery will seek to illustrate. This exhibition is organized by Associate Curator Dara Jaffe.

The BOYZ N THE HOODgallery will explore the 1991 movie’s groundbreaking depiction of Black life in South Los Angeles, as well as its lasting impact in popular culture. The space will highlight writer-director John Singleton’s unique vision for the film, for which he became both the first African American and the youngest person ever to be nominated for the Academy Award® for Best Director. This gallery will also spotlight the larger cast and crew, including Cuba Gooding Jr., Ice Cube, Morris Chestnut, Laurence Fishburne, Nia Long, and Angela Bassett, and show the pivotal role the film played, not only in their careers, but also in ushering in a new generation of Black talent in Hollywood. This gallery is organized by Research Assistants Esme Douglas and Manouchka Kelly Labouba.

Longtime collaboratorsproduction designer Sarah Greenwood and set decorator Katie Spencer have translated a diverse array of periods and locations to screen. From bringing to life Leo Tolstoy’s famous novel in Anna Karenina (2012), to depicting Winston Churchill’s war room in Darkest Hour (2017), this gallery will spotlight Greenwood and Spencer’s collaboration and give a glimpse into their design process. Objects such as research materials, production design drawings, and a set model will be featured in the gallery, organized by Ana Santiago.

A gallery devoted to Lourdes Portillowillhighlight the life and career of this vital documentarian, visual artist, journalist, and activist. Born in Chihuahua, Mexico and raised in Los Angeles, Portillo’s documentaries blend experimental and traditional modes of storytelling to forefront issues of identity and social justice in the US and Latin America. This gallery focuses on key projects including Las Madres: The Mothers of Plaza de Mayo (1985), La Ofrenda: The Days of the Dead (1988), The Devil Never Sleeps (1994), and Señorita Extraviada/Missing Young Woman (2001). This gallery is organized by Sophia Serrano.

STORIES OF CINEMA NEW COLLECTION ROTATIONS
Also during the 2022-2023 season, new objects and media selected from the vast collection of the Academy, as well as loans from private collections, will go on view throughout the Stories of Cinema galleries.

This spring, the Inventing Worlds and Characters galleries that are dedicated to animation and effects will feature: new works highlighting the independent animation of John and Faith Hubley including character animation, cel setup, and backgrounds from Moonbird (1959) and Cockaboody (1974); new cels from Katsuhiro Otomo’s Akira (1988); concept drawings by Ray Harryhausen for Jason and the Argonauts (1963); and concept drawings by Georges Méliès for The Conquest of the Pole (À la conquête du pôle, 1912).

In November, the Identity gallery will feature costumes worn by Elizabeth Taylor in A Place in the Sun (1951) designed by Edith Head; Olivia Coleman as Queen Anne in The Favourite (2018), designed by Sandy Powell; Tilda Swinton as Madame Blanc in Suspiria (2018) designed by Giulia Piersanti; and Richard Pryor as Charlie Snow in The Bingo Long Traveling All-Stars and Motor Kings (1973), designed by Bernard Johnson. The gallery will highlight renowned make-up artist Ken Diaz and legendary costume designer Ann Roth through in-depth case studies of their work.

In spring 2023, new additions to the gallery will include costumes worn by Anna May Wong as Tu Tuan in Limehouse Blues (1934), designed by Travis Banton; Carmen Miranda as Rosita Rivas in Weekend in Havana (1941), designed by Gwen Wakeling; Humphrey Bogart as Philip Marlowe in The Big Sleep (1946), designed by Leah Rhodes; Joan Crawford in Mildred Pierce (1946), designed by Milo Anderson; and Marlon Brando as Fletcher Christian in Mutiny on the Bounty (1962), designed by Moss Mabry.

In November, the Academy Awards History gallery will showcase Gregory Peck’s Oscar for To Kill a Mockingbird (1962), the Elie Saab gown worn by Halle Berry to the 74th Academy Awards in 2002, the tuxedo worn by Francis Ford Coppola to the 45th Academy Awards in 1973, and the Swarovski-studded vegan leather jacket worn by costume designer Jenny Beavan to the 88th Academy Awards in 2016.

In November, the Story gallery, dedicated to showcasing the creation and development of story in cinema, will highlight case studies on Hitchcock’s adaptations of Daphne du Maurier’s writing: Rebecca (1940) and The Birds (1963). The Rebecca study will look at the role producer David O. Selznick played in bringing the film to the screen, as well as the importance of Kay Brown, Selznick’s East Coast Story Editor, and writer Joan Harrison. The Birds installation will focus on Evan Hunter’s script and Harold Michelson’s storyboards of the now iconic sequence outside the schoolhouse.

Additional new objects from films spanning the silent era to the present day include script pages from Stella Dallas (1925), written by Frances Marion; script pages from Adam’s Rib (1949), written by Ruth Gordon and Garson Kanin; notebooks and script pages for Mosquita y Mari (2012), written and directed by Aurora Guerrero; and script notes and script pages from Queen and Slim (2019), written by Lena Waithe.  

In spring 2023, the Image gallery—which already includes vital interviews and the works of many cinematographers, production designers, and set decorators—will be expanded to include conversations with film editors Carol Littleton, Maysie Hoy, and Sam Pollard. These important interviews are from the Academy Oral History Collection.

Visiting the Academy Museum
Tickets to the Academy Museum are available only through advance online reservations via the Academy Museum’s website and mobile app. General admission tickets for the museum’s exhibitions are $25 for adults, $19 for seniors (age 62+), and $15 for students. Admission for visitors ages 17 and younger, and for California residents with an EBT, card is free.


Images: (top left): The Nicholas Brothers in a scene from Stormy Weather (1943), Fayard Nicholas, left, and Harold Nicholas, photographic print, gelatin silver. Courtesy Margaret Herrick Library, © Twentieth Century Fox; (top center): The Godfather (1972), film still, courtesy of Paramount Pictures; (top right) Humphrey Bogart and Ingrid Bergman during production of Casablanca (1942), Warner Bros., Image courtesy Margaret Herrick Library; (bottom left): Agnés Varda on the set of Lon Bonheur, ©1964 ciné-tamaris, photo by Marilou Parolini; (bottom center left): BOYZ N THE HOOD (1991) film still, Sony Pictures Entertainment; (bottom center right): Carl Laemmle, undated, Courtesy Margaret Herrick Library; (bottom right): Lourdes Portillo, Courtesy International Documentary Association

CreditStories of Cinema is organized by Academy Museum of Motion Pictures Director and President Bill Kramer, Senior Director of Curatorial Affairs Doris Berger, Exhibitions Curator Jenny He, and Assistant Curators J. Raúl Guzmán, Dara Jaffe, Ana Santiago, and Sophia Serrano, with support from Research Assistants Esme Douglas and Manouchka Kelly Labouba, the Academy Museum Inclusion Advisory Committee, and the Academy Branch Task Forces. The exhibition is presented by PWC. Major funding is provided by Gerald Schwartz and Heather Reisman. Generous support provided by Metro Goldwyn Mayer, Ruderman Family Foundation, FotoKem, Barbara Roisman Cooper and Martin M. Cooper, Jocelyn R. Katz, John Ptak and Margaret Black, Lauren Shuler Donner, Randy E. Haberkamp, Kevin McCormick and A. Scott Berg, and John and Lacey Williams. Technology solutions are generously provided by Panasonic and Sony Electronics Inc. Stories of Cinema is powered by Dolby, and Dolby is the exclusive audio partner for the Composer gallery. Academy Museum digital engagement platform sponsored by Bloomberg Philanthropies.

Regeneration: Black Cinema 1898–1971 is the recipient of the 2018 Sotheby’s Prize. The Sotheby’s Prize was founded to support and encourage museums to break new ground by recognizing curatorial excellence and facilitating an upcoming exhibition that explores overlooked or underrepresented art history. The Sotheby’s Prize was awarded by a jury of museum curators and directors comprising Sir Nicholas Serota, Donna De Salvo, Okwui Enwezor, Connie Butler, Emilie Gordenker, and chaired by Allan Schwartzman. Regeneration  is also made possible in part by major grants from the National Endowment for the Humanities. The exhibition is supported by grants from the National Endowment for the Arts and from the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors through the Los Angeles County Department of Arts and Culture. Academy Film Archive restorations are funded in part by grants from the National Endowment for the Arts and the Capital Group Companies Charitable Foundation.

About the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures 
The Academy Museum is the largest museum in the United States devoted to the arts, sciences, and artists of moviemaking. The museum advances the understanding, celebration, and preservation of cinema through inclusive and accessible exhibitions, screenings, programs, initiatives, and collections. Designed by Pritzker Prize-winning architect Renzo Piano, the museum’s campus contains the restored and revitalized historic Saban Building—formerly known as the May Company building (1939)—and a soaring spherical addition. Together, these buildings contain 50,000 square feet of exhibition spaces, two state-of-the-art theaters, the Shirley Temple Education Studio, and beautiful public spaces that are free and open to the public. These include: The Walt Disney Company Piazza and the Sidney Poitier Grand Lobby, which houses the Spielberg Family Gallery, Academy Museum Store, and Fanny’s restaurant and café. The Academy Museum exhibition galleries are open seven days a week, with hours Sunday through Thursday from 10am to 6pm and Friday and Saturday from 10am to 8pm.
 

Academy Museum and LAist Studios to Launch The Academy Museum Podcast.

Academy Museum of Motion Pictures and Southern California Public Radio’s
LAist Studios to Launch The Academy Museum Podcast, a New Podcast Series Exploring the Impact, History, Art, and Artists of Cinema.

Hosted by the Academy Museum’s Chief Artistic and Programming Officer,  Jacqueline Stewart, the First Season, “And The Oscar® Goes To…,” Examines 10 Pivotal Academy Awards® Ceremonies

Los Angeles, Calif., March 17, 2022 —The Academy Museum of Motion Pictures is partnering with Southern California Public Radio’s LAist Studios to release The Academy Museum Podcast―a new multi-season audio series that examines the myriad stories of our cinematic history inspired by the museum’s galleries. Jacqueline Stewart, Chief Artistic and Programming Officer of the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures and a MacArthur Fellow, will host the series. 

The inaugural season of this podcast, And the Oscar® Goes To…, premieres onFriday, March 25.This 10-episode season goes behind-the-scenes of touchstone Academy Awards®ceremonies, probing key social and cultural moments that impacted film artists as well as film fans over the years. Subsequent episodes will launch weekly. 

Episodes include revelatory interviews and in-depth conversations with Oscar® winners, film artists, industry leaders, activists, journalists, and scholars, as well as archival audio and other exclusive content that will only be accessible through the podcast. Guests include Halle Berry, Scott Feinberg, Dave Karger, Gregory Nava, Kimberly Peirce, and Bruce Vilanch, among others. Listeners can find the series on the Academy Museum and KPCC websites, as well as on iTunes/Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, and other podcast platforms. 

The Academy Museum Podcast will significantly expand the reach of the incredible exhibitions and programs that the museum is presenting both on our campus in Los Angeles and via our virtual programming. Our podcast will allow us to take deeper dives into the multitude of stories about how films are made, how the film industry has evolved, and the impact of cinema on our lives,” said Stewart.

“LAist Studios is thrilled to partner with the Academy Museum—the most spectacular new movie museum in the United States—to bring the stories of our hometown industry to our listeners,” said Herb Scannell, CEO and President of Southern California Public Radio. “The Academy Museum Podcast offers unprecedented access to iconic and important movie moments.”

The first episode for this season, “2002: This Door Has Been Opened,” revisits the historic night when Halle Berry became the first Black woman to win the Academy Award® for Best Actress in a Leading Role for her performance in Monster’s Ball (2001). Her emotional speech closed out a night that was marked by a celebration of Black excellence: Sidney Poitier received a lifetime achievement award and Denzel Washington won the award for Best Actor in a Leading Role for his performance in Training Day (2001). But while the night seemed to signal a historic shift, Berry now calls her historic win “one of my biggest heartbreaks.” Berry reveals to Stewart how the night felt from her perspective and the ways in which the win impacted her career.

Future episodes include:

  • “1940: Cinema’s Best Year?” ―This episode will explore the bevy of iconic films released in 1939—Mr. Smith Goes to WashingtonThe Wizard of OzStagecoachThe Women, and more—and look at the double-edged experience of Hattie McDaniel on the night she became the first Black Oscar® winner for Gone with the Wind
  • “1951: It’s Going to be a Bumpy Night” ―This ceremony celebrated two films that captured the complexities of show business and its impact on women: All About Eve and Sunset Boulevard.
  • “1953: Broadcasting the Oscars” ―The episode will look at the history of broadcasting the Oscars®, from radio to television, the rituals fans have created around the broadcast, and a discussion of the future of presenting the Academy Awards in the age of social media.
  • “1954: The Brave One(s)” ―This episode will examine the long history of blacklisting in Hollywood, looking at the treatment of writers including Walter Bernstein and the Academy’s posthumous recognition of Dalton Trumbo in 1993.
  • “1973: Marlon Brando Cannot Accept This Very Generous Award” ―This episode will revisit the speech actor Sacheen Littlefeather delivered on Marlon Brando’s behalf to explore Native American representation in cinema and controversies about using the Oscars stage as a platform for activism.
  • “1999: For Your Consideration” ―This episode will look at how campaigning changed the Oscars game at the turn of the century and the long history of campaigning dating back to Louis B. Mayer.
  • “2000: Boys Don’t Cry” ―This episode will discuss LGBTQ+ representation in media, the complex issue of straight actors playing trans and gay characters, actors who come out, and actors who change gender identities.
  • “2015: Oscars So White” ―This episode will explore the evolution of this issue, the ways the Academy continues to respond, and what this meant for the show’s producers.
  • “2019: Muchas Gracias, Mexico” ―This episode will look at the success of Mexican film artists at the Oscars―Alfonso Cuarón, Alejandro González Iñárritu, Guillermo del Toro, and Emmanuel Lubezki and why US Latinx filmmakers and films are far less prevalent in the industry overall.
     

About the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures
The Academy Museum is the largest museum in the United States devoted to the arts, sciences, and artists of moviemaking. The museum advances the understanding, celebration, and preservation of cinema through inclusive and accessible exhibitions, screenings, programs, initiatives, and collections. Designed by Pritzker Prize-winning architect Renzo Piano, the museum’s campus contains the restored and revitalized historic Saban Building—formerly known as the May Company building (1939)—and a soaring spherical addition. Together, these buildings contain 50,000 square feet of exhibition spaces, two state-of-the-art theaters, the Shirley Temple Education Studio, and beautiful public spaces that are free and open to the public. These include: The Walt Disney Company Piazza and the Sidney Poitier Grand Lobby, which houses the Spielberg Family Gallery, Academy Museum Store, and Fanny’s restaurant and café. The Academy Museum exhibition galleries are open seven days a week, with hours Sunday through Thursday from 10am to 6pm and Friday and Saturday from 10am to 8pm.

About Southern California Public Radio (SCPR) and LAist Studios
Southern California Public Radio (scpr.org) is a member-supported multi-platform public media organization that has garnered more than 500 journalistic honors since 1999. Recognized as a national leader in public service journalism and civic engagement, SCPR’s flagship radio station, 89.3 KPCC-FM, reaches more than 900,000 listeners every week as the most listened-to public radio news service across Southern California. The network’s five stations (89.3 KPCC-FM, 89.1 KUOR-FM, 90.3 KVLA-FM, 89.9 FM, and 89.5 KJAI-FM) deliver award-winning local news coverage to the diverse communities of the region, including a robust slate of signature programs from NPR, APM, the BBC and PRI. LAist (laist.com) is a digital news site committed to in-depth reporting about life in the Los Angeles metropolitan area. Its award-winning work reaches over seven million people per month, and in 2019, the brand grew to include LAist Studios (laiststudios.com), a dedicated podcast development and production studio. Furthering SCPR’s commitment to premium on-demand audio storytelling, podcasts from LAist Studios aim to reflect the ethos of Los Angeles—a forward-looking, minority-majority community built upon unmatched diversity, inclusion, and drive—going beyond geographical borders to connect with listeners around the globe who share the LA state of mind.

Academy Museum Gala to Honor producer Miky Lee, writer Steve McQueen, and actor Tilda Swinton on October 15, 2022.

GALA CO-CHAIRS ARE HALLE BERRY, JASON BLUM, RYAN MURPHY, AND LUPITA NYONG’OTHE EVENING IS SUPPORTED BY ROLEX.

Los Angeles, Calif.- March 16, 2022—The Academy Museum of Motion Pictures today announced details of its second annual gala, to be held on October 15, 2022. The Academy Museum Gala will celebrate the acclaimed new museum’s one-year anniversary and will honor Academy Museum Trustee and groundbreaking producer Miky Lee, Academy Award®-winning director, producer, and writer Steve McQueen, and Academy Award-winning actor Tilda Swinton.

The evening is being co-chaired by Academy Award-winning actor and Academy Museum supporter Halle Berry, Academy Museum Trustee and producer Jason Blum,Academy Museum Trustee and screenwriter, director, producer Ryan Murphy,and Academy Award-winning actor Lupita Nyong’o. The evening is presented by Rolex and will raise vital funds to support the museum’s access, education, and programming initiatives. Rolex is also the official watch partner and founding supporter of the Academy Museum.

Bill Kramer, Director and President of the Academy Museum, said, “Our inaugural Gala in 2021 was a wonderful celebration of the artists and patrons of the Academy Museum. It was an incredible reminder of the power, artistry, diversity, and resilience of our film industry. At our 2022 Gala, we are deeply honored to recognize three members of our international film community whose outstanding achievements inspire us all: Miky Lee, Steve McQueen, and Tilda Swinton. We express our gratitude to Halle Berry, Jason Blum, Ryan Murphy, and Lupita Nyong’o for hosting this important evening and to Rolex for being a steadfast and engaged supporter of the Academy Museum Gala and global cinema.”

The three awards presented annually at the Academy Museum Gala reflect the museum’s mission to advance the understanding, celebration, and preservation of cinema and to contextualize and challenge dominant narratives around cinema.

  • The gala’s Vantage Award, honoring an artist or scholar who has helped to contextualize and challenge dominant narratives around cinema, will be given to Steve McQueen.
  • Tilda Swinton, an actress known for dedicating herself to collaborations with some of cinema’s most daring innovators, will receive the Visionary Award, honoring an artist or scholar whose extensive body of work has advanced the art of cinema.
  • Miky Lee will receive the gala’s Pillar Award, which acknowledges exemplary leadership and support for the Academy Museum.

The 2021 Academy Museum Gala raised more than $11MM for the museum’s film, educational, and access programming. Additional details about the 2022 Gala will be announced in the coming months.

ABOUT THE HONOREES
Miky Lee (Mie Kyung Lee) is vice chairwoman of South Korea’s CJ Group and is responsible for the overall strategic direction and management of the group’s entertainment and media subsidiary, CJ ENM. CJ ENM is the country’s foremost film and television studio, cable operator, and music producer.

Lee earned her BA at Seoul National University and received her MA in Asian Studies from Harvard. In 1994, Lee founded the entertainment and media division of CJ and invested in DreamWorks SKG as one of the early investors. Since then, Lee has continued to strengthen CJ’s presence by leading the global phenomenon of the Korean cultural movement. In fact, she was the key driving force behind K-POP’s global success, creating and growing KCON, the world’s largest fan celebration of Korean culture and music.

Lee was on the Forbes Asia list of Asia’s 50 Power Businesswomen in 2012 and 2014. In 2017, Lee was named one of the founding Leadership Champions of the World Bank affiliated Women Entrepreneurs Finance Initiative (We-Fi).

CJ ENM has been involved in films such as Jung Ji-woo’s Happy End (1999), Park Chan-wook’s Joint Security. Area (2000), and Kang Woo-suk’s Silmido (2003). In 2019, Lee was executive producer of Parasite, the first foreign language film in history to win the Best Picture Oscar; she was later named The Hollywood Reporter’sInternational Producer of the Year in 2020. CJ ENM r ecently acquired the production-distribution company Endeavor Content.

Lee has been a Board Member of the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures since 2019 and currently serves are the Board’s Vice Chair. She has been deeply supportive of the museum’s expansive AAPI film programming.

Steve McQueen is a Turner Prize and Academy Award-winning artist and filmmaker. In all of his work, McQueen is committed to telling deep and compelling truths that are often untold or overlooked.

In 2008, McQueen’s critically acclaimed first feature Hunger, a historical drama about the 1981 Irish hunger strike, won the Camera d ’Or at the Cannes Film Festival. His second feature Shame, about the horrors of addiction, won two awards when it premiered at the Venice Film Festival in 2011. His third film  12 Years A Slave (2013), an adaptation of Solomon Northup’s 1853 slave narrative memoir, received numerous prizes, most notably winning three Academy Awards including Best Picture. In 2018, he released  Widowsstarring Viola Davis, who was nominated for a Best Actress BAFTA.

McQueen’s most recent project, Small Axe, is an anthology of five films which brings to life the experiences of London’s West Indian community. An unprecedented two of the films were selected for the 2020 Cannes Film Festival. As well as being nominated for a Golden Globe, the series of films won LA Film Critics Best Picture 2020. The anthology reflects the Black British experience from the late

1960s to the early 1980s.

McQueen is currently working on Occupied City, a new documentary that looks at Amsterdam under Nazi occupation during World War II.

Tilda Swinton’s cinematic resume is varied and growing. She has appeared in a multitude of films, starting in 1985 with Derek Jarman’s Caravaggio.  She and Jarman made seven more films together, including The Last of England (1987), War Requiem (1989), The Garden (1990), Edward II (1991) (for which she won the Best Actress award at the 1991 Venice International Film Festival), and Wittgenstein (1993), before Jarman’s death in 1994.  She gained wider international recognition in 1992 with her portrayal of the title character in Orlando, based on the novel by Virginia Woolf and directed by Sally Potter.

She has established ongoing filmmaking relationships with, among others, Jim Jarmusch, Joel and Ethan Coen, Lynne Ramsay, Luca Guadagnino, Joanna Hogg, Wes Anderson, David Fincher, and Bong Joon Ho. She has worked with Hungarian master Béla Tarr and with Judd Apatow. In 2020, she made the greatly acclaimed The Human Voice with Pedro Almodóvar.

Since 2008, she has curated bespoke film festivals, both in and around her home village in Scotland and internationally. Always intended to be unexpected and inspired by wonder and the enchantment of communal experience, these magical gatherings—informed by treasure hunts, children’s parties, and flash-mob spontaneity—are testament to her dedication to what she calls Big Cinema, to which she remains devoted.

She received both the BAFTA and Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress of 2008 for Tony Gilroy’s Michael Clayton (2007).  In 2020, she was the recipient of both a BFI Fellowship and a Leone d’Oro at the Venice film festival for her lifetime’s work.

In 2021, Tilda Swinton’s work included Apichatpong Weerasethakul’s Memoria, Joanna Hogg’s Souvenir 2, and Wes Anderson’s The French Dispatch. 2022 will see the premieres of George Miller’s Three Thousand Years of Longing with Idris Elba, Wes Anderson’s Asteroid City, Joanna Hogg’ s The Eternal Daughter, and Julio Torres’s untitled feature comedy with A24.

About Rolex
For almost a century, Rolex and cinema have enjoyed close ties. A kinship that started spontaneously—Rolex watches, a symbol of fortitude and strength, appeared on actors’ wrists in many memorable films—has grown ever stronger over the years, notably through the watchmaker’s active support for film directors, whether established or rising talents. The close relationship between Rolex and the film industry was formalized in 2017 when the brand signed a partnership agreement with the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. Rolex thereby became the Academy’s Exclusive Watch and Proud Sponsor of the Oscars ceremony, for which it also designs and hosts the Greenroom, an elegant space where presenters and guests mingle before going on stage. In 2018, the brand became a sponsor of the Academy’s annual Governors Awards honoring lifetime achievement. Its support of the Academy Museum is part of this broadening relationship. The two organizations are united by a commitment to excellence, a sense of history and a mission to preserve and celebrate the creation of extraordinary works—masterpieces.

Images: (left) Miky Lee, photo by Tracy Kumono; (center) Steve McQueen, photo by John Russo; (right) Tilda Swinton, photo credit: Michael Lavine / CPi Syndication

About the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures 
The Academy Museum is the largest museum in the United States devoted to the arts, sciences, and artists of moviemaking. The museum advances the understanding, celebration, and preservation of cinema through inclusive and accessible exhibitions, screenings, programs, initiatives, and collections. Designed by Pritzker Prize-winning architect Renzo Piano, the museum’s campus contains the restored and revitalized historic Saban Building—formerly known as the May Company building (1939)—and a soaring spherical addition. Together, these buildings contain 50,000 square feet of exhibition spaces, two state-of-the-art theaters, the Shirley Temple Education Studio, and beautiful public spaces that are free and open to the public. These include: The Walt Disney Company Piazza and the Sidney Poitier Grand Lobby, which houses the Spielberg Family Gallery, Academy Museum Store, and Fanny’s restaurant and café. The Academy Museum exhibition galleries are open seven days a week, with hours Sunday through Thursday from 10am to 6pm and Friday and Saturday from 10am to 8pm.

EVA LONGORIA APPEARS IN “SEEN,” THE ACADEMY’S INTERVIEW SERIES FOCUSED ON FILMMAKERS AND ARTISTS

Available now on the Academy’s YouTube

Eva Longoria, actor, director, producer
Nick Barili, journalist, director, writer, producer

Los Angeles, Calif. – The newest episode of “Seen” – features Eva Longoria in conversation with journalist and series host Nick Barili.  Longoria and Barili visit the campus of California State University, Northridge, from which Longoria received a master’s degree in Chicano Studies in 2013.  Longoria opens up about the importance of knowing your history, and why she kept her day job for the first two years of her acting career.

The episode is available now on the Academy’s YouTube.

For more information on this episode of “Seen” and others in the series, please click here.

ABOUT THE ACADEMY
The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences is a community of more than 10,000 of the most accomplished artists, filmmakers and executives working in film. In addition to celebrating and recognizing excellence in filmmaking through the Oscars, the Academy supports a wide range of initiatives to promote the art and science of the movies, including public programming, educational outreach and the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures.

FOLLOW THE ACADEMY
www.oscars.org
www.facebook.com/TheAcademy
www.youtube.com/Oscars
www.twitter.com/TheAcademy
www.instagram.com/TheAcademy

Academy Museum Announces February and March Programs, marking the 50th anniversary of the release of The Godfather.

50THANNIVERSARY SCREENING OF THE GODFATHER WITH FRANCIS FORD COPPOLA, A SPECIAL SCREENING OF PAN’S LABYRINTH WITH GUILLERMO DEL TORO, RETROSPECTIVES OF ISAO TAKAHATA, PIER PAOLO PASOLINI, AND CECILIA MANGINI, AND RARE SCREENINGS OF RECENTLY RESTORED FILMS.

Ongoing Series including Oscar® Sundays, featuring Oscar-recognized films; Branch Selects, which features films co-programmed with Academy Branches; and Family Matinees.

Los Angeles, Calif., January 25, 2021The Academy Museum of Motion Pictures will continue its eclectic calendar of film screenings and public programs this winter with retrospectives of Studio Ghibli co-founder Isao Takahata, presented in conjunction with the museum’s Hayao Miyazaki exhibition, and Italian directors Cecilia Mangini and Pier Paolo Pasolini, the latter of which launches the Academy Museum’s partnership with Cinecittà in support of an annual programming series of Italian Cinema.

Marking the 50th anniversary of the release of The Godfather, the museum will be screening the entire trilogy, including a special Academy Museum Member screening of The Godfather (USA, 1972) with Director Francis Ford Coppola. The museum will also host writer-director Guillermo del Toro for a special screening of his film Pan’s Labyrinth (USA, 2006) with an extended conversation about the movie, and screen the world premiere of a brand-new print of Scarecrow in a Garden of Cucumbers, Robert J. Kaplan’s film starring actress Holly Woodlawn, from the Academy Film Archive.  

The recurring series Available Space, showcasing experimental and independent film and media, will highlight the work of Johann Lurf and a sampling of restorations by the Academy Film Archive of the films of Stan Brakhage. The museum’s Weekend With… series will feature screenings of films by Moufida Tlatli and Jill Sprecher. Screenings highlighting the films featured in the museum’s core exhibition Stories of Cinema , films curated by members of the Academy branches, movies honored at the Oscars® and Saturday Family Matinees will continue to offer audiences familiar classics and new discoveries. Throughout February, the museum’s ongoing series spotlight the work of film artists, including Ava DuVernay, Barry Jenkins, and the late Sidney Poitier in Lilies of the Field.


PROGRAM HIGHLIGHTS

  • The Godfather Trilogy:In honor of the 50th anniversary of The Godfather (USA, 1972), the Academy Museum will be screening Francis Ford Coppola’s complete trilogy, concluding with the director’s 2020 recut of the third chapter, in new 4K restorations. The March 21screening is for Academy Museum Members and includes a pre-screening Q&A with Director Francis Ford Coppola. (March 21–24)
  • Guillermo del Toro presents Pan’s Labyrinth: A special screening of Pan’s Labyrinth followed by a conversation with writer-director Guillermo del Toro. The film earned six Academy Award nominations including Foreign Language Film, and won for its stunning Art Direction, Cinematography, and Makeup. (Feb 9)
  • Everyday Life: The Films of Isao Takahata: Presented in conjunction with the landmark exhibition Hayao Miyazaki, this retrospective includes all of Takahata’s Studio Ghibli features, beginning with the stunning World War II tragedy Grave of the Fireflies (Japan, 1988), as well as a selection of the theatrical films he made earlier in his career. Many of these earlier works also feature collaboration from a young Miyazaki, whom Takahata met when both were working at the famous Toei Animation studio. (Feb 3–16)
  • Carnal Knowledge: The Films of Pier Paolo PasoliniThe Academy Museum honors the centennial of poet, philoso­pher, and filmmaker Pier Paolo Pasolini with a complete retrospective of his narrative films interspersed with some unique short and documentary works from his prolific career, all screening on preserved 35mm prints or new DCPs. (Feb 17–Mar 12)
  • Special Screening, Scarecrow in a Garden of Cucumbers:Celebrate Valentine’s Day with a new print of this 1972 musical satire from the Academy Film Archive. Directed by Robert J. Kaplan, this nearly lost film stars Andy Warhol Factory superstar and Lou Reed muse Holly Woodlawn, as a small-town girl trying to make it in the Big Apple. (Feb 14)
  • Rare Takes: The Works of Cecilia Mangini: In dialogue with the Pier Paolo Pasolini retrospective, the Academy Museum presents a series on the work of his collaborator Cecilia Mangini, the first woman to make documentaries in post-war Italy. The retrospective follows her passing at the age of 93 in 2021. (Mar 5–20)
  • Weekend With…: The series offering audiences the chance to dive deep into the work of a filmmaker, actor, or key creative over the course of one weekend, continues with:
    • Weekend With…Moufida TlatliFeaturing rarely screened films by Tunisian film editor-turned-director Moufida Tlatli, among them The Silences of the Palace (Tunisia/France, 1994) and The Season of Men (Tunisia/France, 2000). (Feb 19)
    • Weekend With…Jill SprecherTwo days of screenings celebrating the work and influences of Jill Sprecher, director of Clockwatchers (USA, 1998) and Thirteen Conversations about One Thing (USA, 2002), will feature post-screening conversations with the filmmaker. (Mar 18–19)
  • Available Space, the Academy Museum’s ongoing series showcasing experimental and independent film and media, will include:
    • ★ by Johann Lurf, featuring a screening of the 2022 edition of an epic chronological assembly of sequences of the starry sky from the very beginning of cinema up to the present year (the film is updated annually), preceded by the Vienna-based filmmaker’s short film Twelve Tales Told (Austria, 2004), in which he interweaves a dozen major studio logos to create a cinematic time-sculpture celebrating and satirizing the epic-scale branding of industrial cinema. (Feb 24)
    • And Early and Late Brakhagea sampling of restorations by the Academy Film Archive, with a unique focus on films drawn from Brakhage’s earliest years of production alongside films from his last years of activity, including his final masterpiece of hand-painting Panels for the Walls of Heaven (USA, 2002). (Mar 10)

ONGOING SERIES AND PROGRAMS

  • Oscar® Sundays: Held every Sunday evening in the David Geffen Theater, this series celebrates films that have been honored at the Academy Awards. For the month of February, the museum will highlight Black filmmakers cited at the Oscars and in March films written by women, such as Lilies of the Field (USA, 1963), Moonlight (USA, 2016), When Harry Met Sally… (USA, 1989) and Thelma & Louise (USA, 1991).
  • Family Matinees: Held every Saturday for families of all ages, screenings in February will celebrate Black filmmakers and include A Wrinkle in Time (USA, 2018) and Soul (USA, 2020), among others.
  • Branch Selects: The series, which will screen 52 titles over the span of 2022 curated by members of the 17 branches of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, continues with Citizen Kane (USA, 1941), Doctor Zhivago (USA, 1965), and The Graduate (USA, 1967), among other films that celebrate the achievements of each branch’s craft.
  • Stories of Cinema: Featuring screenings of films and filmmakers highlighted in the museum’s core exhibition, the series will continue with I Am Not Your Negro (USA, 2016), Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon (China, 2000), and The Tree of Life (USA, 2011), among others.

In addition, education and family programs will be ongoing at the Academy Museum. Programs will take place throughout the museum in exhibition galleries, theaters, and the Shirley Temple Education Studio, and will include family studio activities, family matinee screenings, and in-gallery tours. ASL interpreted tours for hard of hearing and Deaf communities and visual description tours for low vision and blind communities will be offered monthly as well as accommodative Calm Mornings and family film screenings for neurodivergent viewers. A full schedule of Family Matinees may be accessed here.

You can see the full schedule of the Academy Museum’s film screenings and public and educational programs here.


REGISTRATION AND TICKETING FOR FILM SCREENINGS AND PROGRAMS
Tickets for film screenings and public programs are sold separately and do not require general admission to the museum. All tickets are available through advance online reservations via the Academy Museum’s website.

Film screening tickets are $10 for adults, $7 for seniors (age 62+), $5 for college students, $5 for children (age 17 and younger), and $8 for Museum Members.

Beginning in February, admission to daytime film screenings will be $5. This includes Family Matinees.

Public and education program tickets range from free with admission to $20 for adults.

Museum Members receive complimentary general admission for unlimited visits and priority admission. Visitors can learn more about membership benefits, which include a 10% discount in the Academy Museum Store, and exclusive members-only advance film screenings, by visiting the museum’s website.

To visit the museum or attend a program or screening, all visitors must have an advance reservation and
visitors ages 12 and up must show proof of full vaccination OR a negative COVID-19 test which was taken within 72 hours before arrival at the museum. Digital vaccine records or physical vaccine cards are acceptable proof.

The museum will require visitors to follow all current COVID-19 public health guidelines by the state of California and the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health in place at the time of their visit.

The Academy Museum’s 2021–2022 programming is made possible by the support of our generous partners, including:
The Richard Roth Cinema-Arts Fund to showcase global cinema.
Participant in support of programs that engage diverse audiences in the intersection of art and activism.
Ruderman Family Foundation in support of Academy Museum inclusion initiatives and programming.
Cinecittà in support of an annual programming series of Italian Cinema.
Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, in support of Academy Museum programs focused on science and technology in film and the science and technology of film.
Donors to our fund in support of AAPI programming, including Esther S. M. Chui-Chao, Julia and Ken Gouw, and Dr. Peter Lam Kin Ngok of Media Asia Group Holdings Limited.
The generous support of Televisa Foundation-Univision, which is co-presenting Roberto Galvadón, the first of three-film series that celebrates Mexican cinema.
Mexico’s two major film archives, the Cineteca Nacional and the Filmoteca de la UNAM, to whom we are grateful for making the Roberto Galvadón program possible.
Jacob Andreou and Carly Steel in support of Halloween film screenings.

IMAGE CREDITSLilies of the Field (1963), film still, courtesy of Park Circus; Grave of the Fireflies (1988), film still courtesy of Studio Ghibli/GKIDS; The Godfather (1972), film still, courtesy of courtesy of Paramount Pictures; Scarecrow in a Garden of Cucumbers (1972), film still, courtesy of H.G. Entertainment, Ltd.

2022 Oscars: Here Are All the Films Eligible for Oscars at the 94th Academy Awards, Jan 20, 2022.

Los Angeles, Calif. – This year’s Oscars race just got a little tighter. Ahead of the nominations announcement on Feb. 8, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences announced a not-so-shortlist of all the films in contention for Oscars at the 94th Academy Awards.

Two hundred seventy-six (276!) movies have met the Academy’s eligibility requirements, which require a 7-day qualifying run in at least one of six U.S. metropolitan areas. Rule provisions this year allow for drive-in theaters, as well as stipulations for films intended for a theatrical release but forced to pivot to streaming.

Here is every film in the running:

The Addams Family 2

Ageless Love

Ailey

All Light, Everywhere

American Night

American Underdog

Annette

Antlers

The Ape Star

Army of the Dead

Ascension

Attica

Back to the Outback

Becoming Cousteau

Being the Ricardos

Belfast

Belle

Benedetta

Berman Island

Best Sellers

The Beta Test

Billie Eilish: The World’s a Little Blurry

Black Widow

Blue Bayou

Bob Spit – We Do Not Like People

Boogie

Boris Karloff: The Man Behind the Monster

The Boss Baby: Family Business

Brian Wilson: Long Promised Road

Bring Your Own Brigade

Bruised

Candyman

The Card Counter

Censor

Cinderella

Clifford the Big Red Dog

C’mon C’mon

Coda

Coming 2 America

Compartment No. 6

The Conjuring: The Devil Made Me Do It

Convergence: Courage in a Crisis

A Cop Movie

The Courier

A Crime on the Bayou

Cruella

Cry Macho

Cryptozoo

Cusp

Cyrano

Dear Evan Hansen

Don’t Look Up

Dream Horse

Drive My Car

The Dry

The Duke

Dune

East of the Mountains

El Planeta

The Electrical Life of Louis Wain

Encanto

Encounter

Eternals

Everybody’s Talking About Jamie

The Eyes of Tammy Faye

F9: The Fast Saga

Fathom

Faya Dayi

Ferguson Rises

Fever Dream

Final Account

Finch

Finding You

First Date

The First Wave

Fix

Flag Day

Flee

The Forever Purge

Fortune Favors Lady Nikuko

Found

Four Good Days

Franceso

Free Guy

The French Dispatch of the Liberty, Kansas Evening Sun

Ghostbusters: Afterlife

Godzilla vs. Kong

The Good Boss

The Grave

The Green Knight

The Guilty

Halloween Kills

The Hand of God

Hard Luck Love Song

The Harder They Fall

Harper

Here Today

A Hero

Hitman’s Wife’s Bodyguard

Holler

Homeroom

House of Gucci

The Humans

I’m Your Man

In the Earth

In the Heights

In the Same Breath

India Sweets and Spices

Introducing, Selma Blair

Jai Bhim

Jockey

Joe Bell

John and the Hole

Josee, The Tiger and the Fish

A Journal for Jordan

Julia

Jungle Cruise

The Killing of Kenneth Chamberlain

The Killing of Two Lovers

King Richard

The King’s Man

Lamb

Language Lessons

Lansky

Last and First Men

The Last Duel

Last Night in Soho

The Laws of the Universe – The Age of Elohim

Les Nôtres

Licorice Pizza

Like a Rolling Stone: The Life & Times of Ben Fong-Torres

Lily Topples the World

Limbo

The Loneliest Whale: The Search for 52

The Lost Daughter

The Lost Leonardo

Love Is Love Is Love

Luca

Malignant

The Many Saints of Newark

Marakkar: Arabikadalinte Simham

Mass

The Matrix Resurrections

Mayday

Memoria

Minamata

Misha and the Wolves

The Mitchells vs. The Machines

Moffie

Mogul Mowgli

Mortal Kombat

Mother/Android

Mothering Sunday

Munich – The Edge of War

The Mustangs: America’s Wild Horses

My Name Is Pauli Murray

My Sunny Maad

Naked Singularity

National Champions

The Night House

Nightmare Alley

Nine Days

No Man of God

No Ordinary Man

No Sudden Move

No Time to Die

Nobody

The Novice

The Nowhere Inn

Old

Old Henry

Operation Mincemeat

Operation Varsity Blues

Paper Spiders

Parallel Mothers

Passing

Paw Patrol The Movie

Peter Rabbit 2: The Runaway

Petite Maman

Pig

Plan B

Pompo the Cinephile

Poupelle of Chimney Town

The Power of the Dog

Pray Away

Prayers for the Stolen

Prisoners of the Ghostland

Procession

Profile

The Protégé

Qazaq History of the Golden Man

Queenpins

Quiet Explosions: Healing the Brain

A Quiet Place Part II

The Race to Save the World

Raya and the Last Dragon

The Real Charlie Chaplin

Rebel Hearts

Red Notice

Red Rocket

Reminiscence

The Rescue

Respect

Riders of Justice

Roadrunner: A Film About Anthony Bourdain

Ron’s Gone Wrong

Sabaya

Senior Moment

7 Prisoners

Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings

Shiva Baby

Silencio

Silent Night

Silo

Silver Carnation

Sing 2

Sisters on Track

Snake Eyes: G.I. Joe Origins

So Late So Soon

Son of Monarchs

Sophie Jones

The Souvenir Part II

Space Jam: A New Legacy

The Sparks Brothers

Spencer

Spider-Man: No Way Home

The Spine of Night

Spiral

Spirit Untamed

The Starling

Stillwater

Sugar Daddy

The Suicide Squad

Summer of Soul (…Or, When the Revolution Could Not Be Televised)

The Summit of the Gods

Swan Song (Apple Original Films)

Swan Song (Magnolia Pictures)

Tango Shalom

The Tender Bar

Test Pattern

This Is the Night

Those Who Wish Me Dead

Tick, Tick…Boom!

Titane

Together

Together Together

Tom Clancy’s Without Remorse

The Tomorrow War

Torn

The Tragedy of Macbeth

Triumph

Truth to Power

12 Mighty Orphans

The Unforgivable

The Unholy

Val

The Velvet Queen

The Velvet Underground

Venom: Let There Be Carnage

Violet

Vivo

The Wake of Light

The Water Man

The Way

Werewolves Within

West Side Story

Whirlybird

The White Line

Who We Are: A Chronicle of Racism in America

Wish Dragon

Wolf

Women Is Losers

The Worst Person in the World

Worth

Wrath of Man

Zola

Nominations voting begins on Jan. 27 and concludes on Feb. 1, with nominations to be announced on Feb. 8. The 94th Academy Awards will be held on March 27 and air live on ABC.

94TH OSCARS® SHORTLISTS IN 10 AWARD CATEGORIES ANNOUNCED.

Los Angeles, Calif. — The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences today announced shortlists in 10 categories for the 94th Academy Awards®: Documentary Feature, Documentary Short Subject, International Feature Film, Makeup and Hairstyling, Music (Original Score), Music (Original Song), Animated Short Film, Live Action Short Film, Sound and Visual Effects.  Download shortlists by category here.

DOCUMENTARY FEATURE
Fifteen films will advance in the Documentary Feature category for the 94th Academy Awards.  One hundred thirty-eight films were eligible in the category.  Members of the Documentary Branch vote to determine the shortlist and the nominees.

The films, listed in alphabetical order by title, are:

“Ascension”
“Attica”
“Billie Eilish: The World’s a Little Blurry”
“Faya Dayi”
“The First Wave”
“Flee”
“In the Same Breath”
“Julia”
“President”
“Procession”
“The Rescue”
“Simple as Water”
“Summer of Soul (…Or, When the Revolution Could Not Be Televised)”
“The Velvet Underground”
“Writing with Fire”


DOCUMENTARY SHORT SUBJECT
Fifteen films will advance in the Documentary Short Subject category for the 94th Academy Awards.  Eighty-two films qualified in the category.  Members of the Documentary Branch vote to determine the shortlist and the nominees.

The films, listed in alphabetical order by title, are:

“Águilas”
“Audible”
“A Broken House”
“Camp Confidential: America’s Secret Nazis”
“Coded: The Hidden Love of J. C. Leyendecker”
“Day of Rage”
“The Facility”
“Lead Me Home”
“Lynching Postcards: “Token of a Great Day””
“The Queen of Basketball”
“Sophie & the Baron”
“Takeover”
“Terror Contagion”
“Three Songs for Benazir”
“When We Were Bullies”


INTERNATIONAL FEATURE FILM
Fifteen films will advance to the next round of voting in the International Feature Film category for the 94th Academy Awards.  Films from 92 countries were eligible in the category.

Academy members from all branches were invited to participate in the preliminary round of voting and must have met a minimum viewing requirement to be eligible to vote in the category.

In the nominations round, Academy members from all branches are invited to opt in to participate and must view all 15 shortlisted films to vote. 

The films, listed in alphabetical order by country, are:

Austria, “Great Freedom”
Belgium, “Playground”
Bhutan, “Lunana: A Yak in the Classroom”
Denmark, “Flee”
Finland, “Compartment No. 6”
Germany, “I’m Your Man”
Iceland, “Lamb”
Iran, “A Hero”
Italy, “The Hand of God”
Japan, “Drive My Car”
Kosovo, “Hive”
Mexico, “Prayers for the Stolen”
Norway, “The Worst Person in the World”
Panama, “Plaza Catedral”
Spain, “The Good Boss”


MAKEUP AND HAIRSTYLING 
Ten films will advance in the Makeup and Hairstyling category for the 94th Academy Awards.  All members of the Academy’s Makeup Artists and Hairstylists Branch will be invited to view seven-minute excerpts and interviews with the artists from each of the shortlisted films on Sunday, January 30, 2022.  Branch members will vote to nominate five films for final Oscar® consideration.

The films, listed in alphabetical order by title, are:

“Coming 2 America”
“Cruella”
“Cyrano”
“Dune”
“The Eyes of Tammy Faye”
“House of Gucci”
“Nightmare Alley”
“No Time to Die”
“The Suicide Squad”
“West Side Story”


MUSIC (ORIGINAL SCORE)
Fifteen scores will advance in the Original Score category for the 94th Academy Awards.  One hundred thirty-six scores were eligible in the category.  Members of the Music Branch vote to determine the shortlist and the nominees.


The scores, listed in alphabetical order by film title, are:

“Being the Ricardos”
“Candyman”
“Don’t Look Up”
“Dune”
“Encanto”
“The French Dispatch of the Liberty, Kansas Evening Sun”
“The Green Knight”
“The Harder They Fall”
“King Richard”
“The Last Duel”
“No Time to Die”
“Parallel Mothers”
“The Power of the Dog”
“Spencer”
“The Tragedy of Macbeth”


MUSIC (ORIGINAL SONG)
Fifteen songs will advance in the Original Song category for the 94th Academy Awards.  Eighty-four songs were eligible in the category.  Members of the Music Branch vote to determine the shortlist and the nominees.

The original songs, along with the motion picture in which each song is featured, are listed below in alphabetical order by film title:

“So May We Start?” from “Annette”
“Down To Joy” from “Belfast”
“Right Where I Belong” from “Brian Wilson: Long Promised Road”
“Automatic Woman” from “Bruised”
“Dream Girl” from “Cinderella”
“Beyond The Shore” from “CODA”
“The Anonymous Ones” from “Dear Evan Hansen”
“Just Look Up” from “Don’t Look Up”
“Dos Oruguitas” from “Encanto”
“Somehow You Do” from “Four Good Days”
“Guns Go Bang” from “The Harder They Fall”
“Be Alive” from “King Richard”
“No Time To Die” from “No Time to Die”
“Here I Am (Singing My Way Home)” from “Respect”
“Your Song Saved My Life” from “Sing 2”


ANIMATED SHORT FILM
Fifteen films will advance in the Animated Short Film category for the 94th Academy Awards.  Eighty-two films qualified in the category.  Members of the Short Films and Feature Animation Branch vote to determine the shortlist and the nominees.

The films, listed in alphabetical order by title, are:

“Affairs of the Art”
“Angakusajaujuq: The Shaman’s Apprentice”
“Bad Seeds”
“Bestia”
“Boxballet”
“Flowing Home”
“Mum Is Pouring Rain”
“The Musician”
“Namoo”
“Only a Child”
“Robin Robin”
“Souvenir Souvenir”
“Step into the River”
“Us Again”
“The Windshield Wiper”


LIVE ACTION SHORT FILM
Fifteen films will advance in the Live Action Short Film category for the 94th Academy Awards.  One hundred forty-five films qualified in the category.  Members of the Short Films and Feature Animation, Directors, Producers and Writers Branches vote to determine the shortlist and the nominees.

The films, listed in alphabetical order by title, are:

“Ala Kachuu – Take and Run”
“Censor of Dreams”
“The Criminals”
“Distances”
“The Dress”
“Frimas”
“Les Grandes Claques”
“The Long Goodbye”
“On My Mind”
“Please Hold”
“Stenofonen”
“Tala’vision”
“Under the Heavens”
“When the Sun Sets”
“You’re Dead Helen”


SOUND
Ten films will advance in the Sound category for the 94th Academy Awards.  Members of the Sound Branch vote to determine the shortlist and the nominees.  All members of the Sound Branch will be invited to view eight-minute excerpts and interviews with the artists from each of the shortlisted films beginning Friday, January 28, 2022.  Branch members will vote to nominate five films for final Oscar consideration.

The films, listed in alphabetical order by title, are:

“Belfast”
“Dune”
“Last Night in Soho”
“The Matrix Resurrections”
“No Time to Die”
“The Power of the Dog”
“A Quiet Place Part II”
“Spider-Man: No Way Home”
“tick, tick…BOOM!”
“West Side Story”


VISUAL EFFECTS
Ten films remain in the running in the Visual Effects category for the 94th Academy Awards.  The Visual Effects Branch Executive Committee determined the shortlist.  All members of the Visual Effects Branch will be invited to view 10-minute excerpts and interviews with the artists from each of the shortlisted films on Saturday, January 29, 2022.  Branch members will vote to nominate five films for final Oscar consideration.

The films, listed in alphabetical order by title, are:

“Black Widow”
“Dune”
“Eternals”
“Free Guy”
“Ghostbusters: Afterlife”
“Godzilla vs. Kong”
“The Matrix Resurrections”
“No Time to Die”
“Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings”
“Spider-Man: No Way Home”

Nominations voting begins on Thursday, January 27, 2022, and concludes on Tuesday, February 1, 2022.

Nominations for the 94th Academy Awards will be announced on Tuesday, February 8, 2022.

The 94th Oscars® will be held on Sunday, March 27, 2022, at the Dolby® Theatre at Hollywood & Highland® in Hollywood and will be televised live on ABC and in more than 200 territories worldwide.

ABOUT THE ACADEMY
The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences is a global community of more than 10,000 of the most accomplished artists, filmmakers and executives working in film. In addition to celebrating and recognizing excellence in filmmaking through the Oscars, the Academy supports a wide range of initiatives to promote the art and science of the movies, including public programming, educational outreach and the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures.

FOLLOW THE ACADEMY
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www.facebook.com/TheAcademy
www.youtube.com/Oscars
www.twitter.com/TheAcademy
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ACADEMY REVEALS WINNING NICHOLL SCREENWRITERS.

Nicholl Fellows to be featured in conversations with Destin Daniel Cretton,
Phil Lord, Our Lady J, Rawson Marshall Thurber and Olivia Wilde
beginning November 8, 2021.

Los Angeles, Calif. – Five individuals have been selected as winners of the 2021 Academy Nicholl Fellowships in Screenwriting competition.  The fellows will each receive a $35,000 prize and mentorship from an Academy member throughout their fellowship year.  From November 8 to 12, one fellow per day will be featured on the Academy’s YouTube channel, in content including conversations with filmmakers Destin Daniel Cretton, Phil Lord, Our Lady J, Rawson Marshall Thurber and Olivia Wilde.  View a preview here.

The 2021 winners are (listed alphabetically by author):

Haley Hope Bartels (Los Angeles, CA), “Pumping Black”
After a desperate cyclist takes up a team doctor’s dangerous offer, he seems on course to win the Tour de France.  But as the race progresses and jealous teammates, suspicious authorities, and his own paranoia close in, he must take increasingly dark measures to protect both his secrets and his lead.

Karin delaPeña Collison (West Hollywood, CA), “Coming of Age”
In 1965 Britain, Charlotte, a sheltered, studious schoolgirl, lands on a British Farce tour her mother stage manages, where private tutoring by company members replaces her formal schooling, with surprising success, and she experiences a Lolita-like flirtation in the morally wobbly era of Free Love, which leads both her and her mother to ‘come of age.’

Byron Hamel (Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada), “Shade of the Grapefruit Tree”
When a severely abused white boy befriends his sci-fi obsessed Black landlady, his fantasy of becoming a robot empowers him to recklessly confront his murderous stepdad.

R. J. Daniel Hanna (Los Angeles, CA), “Shelter Animal”
A fiery, female prison trustee working at the county animal shelter finds purpose rehabilitating an abused pit bull, but her attempts to rally employees and the broader community for shelter reform puts her own freedom at risk.

Laura Kosann (New York, NY), “The Ideal Woman”
Set in American suburbia during the Cuban Missile Crisis: A 1960’s ex-actress and housewife finds her house-of-cards world begin to tumble as she continues to be pitted against two identities.

A record number of 8,191 scripts, from 89 countries, were submitted for this year’s competition.  The first and quarterfinal rounds were judged by industry professionals, including graduates of the Academy’s Diverse Reader Training Workshop, a free referral-only program established to train individuals from underrepresented communities to be story analysts.  The semifinal round was judged by Academy members across the spectrum of the motion picture industry.  Ten individual screenwriters were selected as finalists.  Their scripts were then read and judged by the Academy Nicholl Fellowships Committee, who ultimately voted the winners.

The 2021 finalists are (listed alphabetically by author):

Adam Everett, “Aurora”
Takeo Hori, “American Infamy”
Michael Ouzas, “Third Man”
Jesse White, “Stronghold”
Aaron C. Wong, “Garamba”

Fellowships are awarded with the understanding that the recipients will each complete a feature-length screenplay during their fellowship year.  The Academy acquires no rights to the works of Nicholl fellows and does not involve itself commercially in any way with their completed scripts.

The Academy Nicholl Fellowships Committee is chaired by Academy Short Films and Feature Animation Branch governor Jennifer Yuh Nelson.  The members of the committee are John Bailey and Steven Poster (Cinematographers Branch); William Mechanic (Executives Branch); James Plannette and Stephen Ujlaki (Members-at-Large); Julia Chasman, Peter Samuelson and Robert W. Shapiro (Producers Branch); Bobbi Banks (Sound Branch); and Eric Heisserer, Larry Karaszewski, Dan Petrie Jr., Misan Sagay and Dana Stevens (Writers Branch).

The global competition, which aims to identify and encourage talented new screenwriters, has awarded 171 fellowships since it began in 1986.  In 2021, several past Nicholl fellows added to their feature film and television credits:

  • Alfredo Botello co-wrote the story for Universal Pictures’ “F9: The Fast Saga.”
  • Allison and Nicolas Buckmelter’s Nicholl-winning script, “American Refugee,” will make its debut on EPIX and Paramount Home Entertainment on December 10.
  • Destin Daniel Cretton directed and co-wrote, with fellow Andrew Lanham, Marvel Studios’ “Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings.”
  • Anthony Grieco’s Nicholl-winning script, “Best Sellers,” was released by Screen Media and stars Michael Caine and Aubrey Plaza.
  • Matt Harris’s fellowship year script, “The Starling,” was released by Netflix and stars Melissa McCarthy.
  • Geeta Malik wrote and directed “India Sweets and Spices,” which debuted at Tribeca Film Festival.  The film was adapted from her Nicholl-winning script, “Dinner with Friends.”
  • Andrew W. Marlowe and Terri Edda Miller are executive producers and showrunners on season two of CBS’s “The Equalizer,” starring Queen Latifah.
  • Stephanie Shannon was executive story editor and a writer on Apple TV+’s augmented reality experience “For All Mankind: Time Capsule,” which won an Emmy for Outstanding Innovation in Interactive Programming.
  • Rebecca Sonnenshine was the executive producer and writer on an episode of Amazon Prime’s “The Boys” that was nominated for an Emmy for Outstanding Writing for a Drama Series.  She is currently showrunning Netflix’s “Archive 81.”

For more information about the Academy Nicholl Fellowships in Screenwriting, visit oscars.org/nicholl.

Visit https://www.facebook.com/academygold for updates. Watch the 2020 Nicholl Fellowships in Screenwriting Awards & Table Read presentation. You can email us at nicholl@oscars.org.
 

ABOUT THE ACADEMY
The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences is a global community of more than 10,000 of the most accomplished artists, filmmakers and executives working in film. In addition to celebrating and recognizing excellence in filmmaking through the Oscars, the Academy supports a wide range of initiatives to promote the art and science of the movies, including public programming, educational outreach and the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures.

FOLLOW THE ACADEMY
www.oscars.org
www.facebook.com/TheAcademy
www.youtube.com/Oscars
www.twitter.com/TheAcademy
www.instagram.com/TheAcademy

Academy Museum and the Haas Brothers Announce Limited-Edition NFT Inspired by the Museum’s Academy Museum Pillar Award, the Future of Cinema Gallery.

Los Angeles, Oct. 20, 2021—Bill Kramer, Director and President of the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures, today announced that Los Angeles-based artists Nikolai and Simon Haas will issue limited-edition NFTs to benefit the Academy Museum’s access, education, and programming initiatives. The NFTs will be available via an OpenSea auction from October 20 to 25, 2021.

The design of the Academy Museum/The Haas Brothers NFTs is inspired by the Academy Museum Pillar Award, also created by The Haas Brothers, which references the museum’s soaring sphere building and the iconic gold of the Oscar®. This award is presented annually at the Academy Museum Gala to a philanthropist or philanthropists who have meaningfully supported the museum. It was first awarded to Academy Museum Campaign Chairs Bob Iger, Annette Bening, and Tom Hanks at the Academy Museum Opening Gala on September 25, 2021.

The Academy Museum/The Haas Brothers NFTs are moving renderings of the Pillar Award combined with marquee quotes by film industry leaders sourced from The Future of Cinema gallery, the exit gallery in the museum’s three-floor core exhibition Stories of Cinema. Each quote is minted in five different colors. The first grouping to be issued—comprising five NFTs—will feature a quote from actor Whoopi Goldberg that reads, “The future of cinema is in your hands now.” Other editions of the NFT will feature quotes from additional filmmakers and film artists including Howard Berger, Effie T. Brown, Sid Ganis, and R.J. Kizer.

Bill Kramer said, “We are thrilled to be working with Niki and Simon Haas on both the Pillar Award and on our first NFTs. Their work brilliantly embodies the optimism, beauty, and bold storytelling found at the Academy Museum. The Haas Brothers are dynamically envisioning our gallery, The Future of Cinema, in a new way—and supporting activities that are vital to our own future as an institution—by reimagining the Pillar Award in the forward-looking medium of NFTs.”

“Designing the Pillar Award represented an opportunity to pay homage to the film industry’s rich history and express our reverence for an art form which continues to change the world,” said The Haas Brothers. “Film as a medium is, at its core, fiercely experimental. We have looked to film as a touchstone for our own practice, holding its embrace of new media and experimentation as a guiding principle for artmaking. We are proud to carry this ethos into the newest medium of all, NFTs, with a digital Pillar Award whose existence is a testament to the power of curiosity and the relentless pursuit of storytelling. We are proud to collaborate with the Academy Museum on this opportunity.”

ABOUT THE HAAS BROTHERS
Since founding The Haas Brothers in 2010, twin brothers Nikolai and Simon (b. 1984; Austin, TX) have upended conventional boundaries and hierarchies between and within creative fields. The ethos of their studio is to define themselves by what they stand for rather than what they are in opposition to; what to some resembles rebellion and irreverence is in fact full-hearted curiosity and excitement for the endless modes of self-expression. The Haas Brothers embrace art, craft, and design in equal measure—approaching art like filmmakers with a goal of transporting viewers into a reality of their creation by any means necessary. With an emphasis on felt-sense and a voracious appetite for new mediums with which to express themselves, The Haas Brothers process their experience of the world and make manifest a fantasy-rich world of their own.

Their first solo museum show opened at The Bass Museum of Art in 2018 and their work is held in the collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA), and the Rhode Island School of Design Museum. In 2019, they were the recipients of the Arison Award given by the YoungArts Foundation. The Haas Brothers are represented by Marianne Boesky and United Talent Agency. They live and work in Los Angeles.

IMAGES: The Future of Cinema NFT renderings, 2021, Courtesy The Haas Brothers

ABOUT THE ACADEMY MUSEUM
The Academy Museum is the largest museum in the United States devoted to the arts, sciences, and artists of moviemaking. The museum advances the understanding, celebration, and preservation of cinema through inclusive and accessible exhibitions, screenings, programs, initiatives, and collections. Designed by Pritzker Prize-winning architect Renzo Piano and Renzo Piano Building Workshop in collaboration with Gensler as executive architect, the museum’s campus contains the restored and revitalized historic Saban Building—formerly known as the May Company building (1939)—and a soaring spherical addition. Together, these buildings contain 50,000 square feet of exhibition spaces, two state-of-the-art theaters, an education studio, restaurant, retail store, and beautiful public spaces.