Tag Archives: Academy Museum of Motion Pictures

Academy Museum of Motion Pictures presents TECHNICOLOR SUMMER: DORIS DAY MATINEES – Pillow Talk –

Commemorate what would have been the 100th birthday of actor and singer Doris Day with a book signing of Doris Day: Images of a Hollywood Icon, followed by a screening of Day’s film Pillow Talk.

Los Angeles, Calif. – Doris Day and Rock Hudson joined forces onscreen for the first time in this classic widescreen romantic comedy that helped establish the stars as an iconic pair and earned Day her only Best Actress nomination.

Day plays Jan, an interior decorator who does not realize her new beau, a Texas rancher (Hudson), is actually the womanizing composer she’s unwillingly sharing a party line with. The witty script (by Stanley Shapiro and Maurice Richlin, with story by Russell Rouse and Clarence Greene) won an Oscar for Writing (Story and Screenplay – written directly for the screen) in a field of such eclectic and impressive nominees as The 400 Blows, North by Northwest, and Wild Strawberries. Additional nominations went to the colorful art direction, Frank De Vol’s peppy score, and the priceless Supporting Actress-nominated performance by the great Thelma Ritter. 

Doris Day celebration continues with a book signing of DORIS DAY: IMAGES OF A HOLLYWOOD ICON (Hermes Press, 2022) on August 13, signed in-person by longtime Day associates and co-editors Jim Pierson and Lea Price, and special guest Jackie Joseph!

DIRECTOR: Michael Gordon. WRITTEN BY: Stanley Shapiro, Maurice Richlin. CAST: Rock Hudson, Doris Day, Tony Randall, Thelma Ritter. 1959. 110 min. USA. English. Color. Scope. 35mm.   
Academy Museum film programming generously funded by the Richard Roth Foundation.

TED MANN THEATER

  • SaturdayAugust 13, 20222pm PT
  • https://www.academymuseum.org/en/programs/detail/pillow-talk-01812663-8d1e-64a8-76a2-d82cdbca1a66

JULIA ROBERTS TO BE HONORED WITH ICON AWARD AT THEACADEMY MUSEUM GALA ON OCTOBER 15, 2022.

JULIA ROBERTS JOINS PREVIOUSLY ANNOUNCED HONOREES MIKY LEE, STEVE MCQUEEN, AND TILDA SWINTON, Ariana DeBose, Awkwafina, Colman Domingo, Cynthia Erivo, Dakota Johnson, Eddie Redmayne, Eiza González, Gwyneth Paltrow, Jennifer Garner, Jonathan Majors, Judd Apatow & Leslie Mann,  Leonardo DiCaprio, Letitia Wright, Regina Hall, Ruth Negga, Selma Blair and More Join Academy Museum Gala Host Committee.

LOS ANGELES, CA, JULY 15, 2022—The Academy Museum of Motion Pictures today announced that Academy AwardⓇ-winning actor Julia Roberts, whose career spans three decades, will be honored with the Academy Museum Gala Icon Award. She will join previously announced honorees Miky Lee, Steve McQueen, and Tilda Swinton, each set to be recognized for their invaluable contributions to cinema, at the second annual Academy Museum Gala being held on October 15, 2022.

The evening is presented by Rolex and co-chaired by Academy Award-winning actor and Academy Museum supporter Halle Berry, Academy Museum Trustee and producer Jason Blum, Academy Museum Trustee and screenwriter-director-producer Ryan Murphy, and Academy Award-winning actor Lupita Nyong’o.

The awards presented at the Gala will include:

  • The Icon Award, presented to Julia Roberts, celebrating an artist whose career has had a significant global cultural impact.
  • The Vantage Award, presented to Steve McQueen, honoring an artist or scholar who has helped to contextualize and challenge dominant narratives around cinema.
  • The Visionary Award, presented to Tilda Swinton, honoring an artist or scholar whose extensive oeuvre has advanced the art of cinema.
  • The Pillar Award, presented to Miky Lee, which acknowledges exemplary leadership and support for the Academy Museum.

“Over the course of her expansive and renowned career, Julia has embodied iconic characters and memorable roles,” said Jacqueline Stewart, Director and President of the Academy Museum. “We are thrilled to be honoring her continued excellence in the industry and contribution to the arts. We are deeply grateful to Julia, Miky, Steve, and Tilda, to Rolex, and to our co-chairs and host committee for making our second annual Gala an evening to remember.”

The 2022 Academy Museum Gala Host Committee, also announced today, includes Adrien Brody, Amanda Seyfried & Thomas Sadoski, Ariana DeBose, Awkwafina, Billie Lourd, Bryce Dallas Howard, Chloë Sevigny, Colman Domingo, Cynthia Erivo, Dakota Johnson, Darren Criss, Eddie Redmayne, Eiza González, Elle Fanning, Emma Roberts, George C. Wolfe, Glenn Close, Gwyneth Paltrow, Jamie Lee Curtis, Jennifer Garner, Jessica Alba, Joe Jonas & Sophie Turner, Jon Hamm, Jonathan Majors, Judd Apatow & Leslie Mann, Kate Hudson, Kathryn Hahn, Keke Palmer, Kid Cudi, Kirsten Dunst, Leonardo DiCaprio, Letitia Wright, Lily Collins, Lucy Liu, Natasha Lyonne, Orlando Bloom, Regina Hall, Renée Zellweger, Riley Keough, Robert Duvall, Ron Howard, Ruth Negga, Selma Blair, among many others.

The awards, presented annually at the Academy Museum Gala, reflect the museum’s mission to advance the understanding, celebration, and preservation of cinema and to expand knowledge and conversation about cinema as a global artform and cultural force.

The evening raises vital funds to support the museum’s access, education, and programming initiatives. The inaugural 2021 gala raised more than $11MM.

Overseeing event production and design are Gala Creative Director Lisa Love, and Artistic Director Raul Àvila. 

ABOUT ROLEX AND CINEMA
For many decades, Rolex has maintained close ties with the world of cinema. Its watches have played a role in numerous films, including Oscar®-winning masterpieces. The company promotes excellence, encourages the preservation and transmission of the cinematic arts and celebrates progress by accompanying cinema legends and budding talents: through its Testimonees such as Martin Scorsese and James Cameron, its partnership with the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences and the Rolex Mentor and Protégé Arts Initiative, with its mentorships for talented young filmmakers. Rolex has partnered the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences since 2017, serving as Proud Sponsor of the Oscars, hosting the event’s Greenroom, while also supporting the Governors Awards, recognizing lifetime achievement in film. To assist in the preservation of film history for future generations, Rolex became a Founding Supporter of the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures in Los Angeles. Through its support of the film industry, Rolex champions excellence, the perpetuation of knowledge, the conservation of the art of filmmaking and the rise of new talent.

Image: Julia Roberts, photo by Tom Munro

About the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures
The Academy Museum is the largest museum in the United States devoted to the arts, sciences, and artists of moviemaking. The museum advances the understanding, celebration, and preservation of cinema through inclusive and accessible exhibitions, screenings, programs, initiatives, and collections. Designed by Pritzker Prize-winning architect Renzo Piano, the museum’s campus contains the restored and revitalized historic Saban Building—formerly known as the May Company building (1939)—and a soaring spherical addition. Together, these buildings contain 50,000 square feet of exhibition spaces, two state-of-the-art theaters, Shirley Temple Education Studio, and beautiful public spaces that are free and open to the public. These include: The Walt Disney Company Piazza and the Sidney Poitier Grand Lobby, which houses the Spielberg Family Gallery, Academy Museum Store, and Fanny’s restaurant and café. The Academy Museum exhibition galleries are open seven days a week, with hours Sunday through Thursday from 10am to 6pm and Friday and Saturday from 10am to 8pm.

Academy Museum Announces Regeneration: An Introduction – the first film series for Regeneration: Black Cinema 1898–1971

ACADEMY MUSEUM OF MOTION PICTURES ANNOUNCES DETAILS OF FILM PROGRAMMING TO ACCOMPANY LANDMARK EXHIBITION REGENERATION: BLACK CINEMA 1898–1971.

Screenings include world premieres of films newly restored by  the Academy Film Archive—including Reform School (1939), a film once thought lost.

Los Angeles, Calif., JULY 14, 2022—The Academy Museum of Motion Pictures announced today details of its upcoming film programs including the first film series organized to accompany the landmark exhibition Regeneration: Black Cinema 1898–1971 on view August 21, 2022–April 9, 2023. These programs offer a survey of the films and filmmakers explored in Regeneration , an exhibition that expands our understanding of US film history by highlighting the work of African American filmmakers, including those who worked independently from the Hollywood studio system.

The first film series to accompany the exhibition—Regeneration: An Introduction—will kick off on August 25 with the world-premiere of a new restoration by the Academy Film Archive of the “lost” film Reform School starring Louise Beavers. This series runs until September 29 and will feature more than twenty screenings programmed by Bernardo Rondeau, Senior Director of Film Programs for the Academy Museum. 

Covering the same 70+ year span as the exhibition, from cinema’s infancy in the 1890s to the early 1970s, the film series ranges from showcasing silent era pioneers such as writer-producer-director Oscar Micheaux’s dramas to the groundbreaking allegories of Spencer Williams and the independently produced, genre-defying works of innovators such as Melvin Van Peebles. Audiences will also be introduced to stars largely unknown to mainstream moviegoers—Ralph Cooper, Clarence Brooks, and Francine Everett—alongside iconic screen legends Paul Robeson, Josephine Baker, Harry Belafonte, Sidney Poitier, Lena Horne, and more. 

“It’s been an amazing journey arriving to this first chapter of our film programming to complement the game-changing exhibition Regeneration: Black Cinema1898–1971, which offers a more expansive version of American film history,” said Rondeau. “The screening series will offer audiences the chance to discover the films highlighted in Regeneration, hopefully, deepening their experiences of the exhibition. It is incredible to be able to present films that have not been seen in decades, and I am thankful to our partners, especially the Academy Film Archive for their tremendous efforts in rediscovering and restoring a number of these films making them available like never before to new audiences.” 

In addition to the inaugural film series Regeneration: An Introduction, the museum will launch additional film programming and screenings around Regeneration in late 2022 and early 2023 including world premieres of films newly restored by the Academy Film Archive—Harlem on the Prairie (1937) and Mr. Washington Goes to Town (1942); a centennial celebration of Dorothy Dandridge and Ruby Dee; screenings of silent films with live musical accompaniment; and a screening series by guest programmer Maya Cade to debut in February 2023. 

Cade is the Creator and Curator of Black Film Archive and a Scholar in Residence at the Library of Congress. She has been awarded special distinctions by the New York Film Critics Circle and the National Society of Film Critics for the Archive. Her work has been featured in The New York Times, the Los Angeles TimesNPRThe Paris Review, and Vulture, among other publications. She is the fall 2022 programmer in residence at Indiana University’s Cinema and was the fall 2021 research fellow at Indiana University’s Black Film Center & Archive. Originally hailing from New Orleans, Cade is based in Brooklyn. 

Film screenings for Regeneration: An Introduction  include:

Reform School
Thu, Aug 25 | 7:30pm | Ted Mann Theater

Louise Beavers gives a commanding lead performance as the crusading Mother Barton in this race film long believed to be lost, also known by its misleading re-release title Prison Bait. Beavers plays a probation officer who comes to the defense of young inmate Freddie (Reginald Fenderson) and his pals (the Harlem Tuff Kids) who are subject to constant harassment at a corrupt reform school. The film’s director, Leo Popkin, is one of the three co-founders of the Million Dollar Productions company that produced and distributed films for Black audiences. Its other co-founders were Popkin’s brother Harry and writer-producer-actor Ralph Cooper, “The Dark Gable.”
DIRECTOR: Leo C. Popkin.
WRITTEN BY: Zella Young.
CAST: Louise Beavers, Reginald Fenderson, Monte Hawley, Eugene Jackson.
1939. 82 min. USA. B&W. English. DCP.
Restored in 2020 by the Academy Film Archive with additional funding from the National Endowment for the Arts from a 16mm print donated by Giancarlo Esposito and Laurence Fishburne.


The Flying Ace
Sat, Aug 27 | 5pm | Ted Mann Theater

The charismatic Laurence Criner stars as Captain Billy Stokes—a World War I pilot who returns home to find both romance and a plot involving a gang of payroll thieves. The fact that Black Americans were not permitted to serve as pilots in the US Armed Forces in 1926 didn’t stop white writer-director Richard Norman from putting a valiant Black aviator at the center of this 1926 film. Norman’s roots in race films date to the drama The Green-Eyed Monster (1919), and his Jacksonville, Florida-based Norman Pictures was one of the leading producers of race films alongside the Lincoln Motion Picture Company and the Micheaux Film Corporation.
DIRECTOR: Richard E. Norman.
WRITTEN BY: Richard E. Norman.
CAST: Laurence Criner, Kathryn Boyd, Boise De Legge, Harold Platt.
1926. 65 min. USA. B&W. Silent. 35mm.
Preserved by the Library of Congress. 
Musical score compiled from historic photoplay music by The Mont Alto Motion Picture Orchestra. Performed by Britt Swenson (violin), Brian Collins (clarinet), Dawn Kramer (trumpet), David Short (cello), Rodney Sauer (piano and score compiler). Mastered in HD from 35mm elements from the Norman Studios Collection, preserved by the Library of Congress.


The Emperor Jones with Princess Tam Tam
Sat, Aug 27 | 7:30pm | Ted Mann Theater

The Emperor Jones
Paul Robeson is pure magnetism in this fascinating film adaptation of Eugene O’Neill’s one-act play about a Caribbean dictator reflecting on his past as a Pullman porter in America. In the hands of independent producer-director Dudley Murphy—whose resume ranges from the avant-garde classic Ballet mécanique (1924) to Black and Tan (1929), which introduced film audiences to Duke Ellington—The Emperor Jones is a potent pre-Code parable about power, exploitation, and race. Though he had acted in silent films and on stage, Robeson makes his sound film debut as Brutus Jones and once audiences heard his distinctive baritone, a major star of the sound era was born. 
DIRECTOR: Dudley Murphy.
WRITTEN BY: DuBose Heyward.
CAST: Paul Robeson, Dudley Digges, Frank Wilson, Fredi Washington.
1933. 80 min. USA. B&W. English. 35mm.
Preserved by the Library of Congress.

Princess Tam Tam
Arguably Josephine Baker’s most famous onscreen performance, Princess Tam Tam was the iconic expatriate’s second French film after her breakthrough Zouzou (1934) opposite Jean Gabin. Princess Tam Tam tells a Pygmalion-like story about a jealous French novelist who introduces a puckish Tunisian shepherdess (Baker) to Parisian society as a prank on his unfaithful wife. Baker gives a star-making performance—at times earthy and others pure glamour—though the film’s colonialist perspective remains problematic. Princess Tam Tam was not widely distributed in the US since it was denied the Production Code Administration’s Seal of Approval. The reason? The onscreen depiction of interracial romances. 
DIRECTOR: Edmond T. Gréville.
WRITTEN BY: Pepito Abatino, Yves Mirande.
CAST: Josephine Baker, Albert Prejean, Robert Arnoux, Germaine Aussey.
1935. 77 min. France. B&W. French. 35mm.


Dark Manhattan with Murder in Harlem
Thu, Sep 1 | 7:30pm | Ted Mann Theater

Dark Manhattan
The first true Black gangster film, Dark Manhattan is the brainchild of its star and uncredited co-director, Ralph Cooper, also the founder of the Apollo Theater’s legendary Amateur Night. A compact and stylish crime saga about a teetotaling hood (Cooper) whose meteoric rise sends shockwaves to rival crews, the film offers a rich panorama of underworld figures and a charismatic lead role for Cooper to sink his teeth into. Despite being filmed entirely on the West Coast, the film evokes the electric energy of its namesake location. 
DIRECTOR: Harry Fraser. 
WRITTEN BY: George Randol.
CAST: Ralph Cooper, Cleo Herndon, Clarence Brooks, Jess Lee Brooks.
1937. 77 min. USA. B&W. English. DCP.
Preserved by the Library of Congress.

Murder in Harlem
Oscar Micheaux remakes his own silent film, The Gunsaulus Mystery (1921), in this expressionistic crime film set in a chemical factory. When the body of a white woman is found on-site, the murder is pinned on the Black night watchman on duty. But trailblazing Black lawyer Henry Glory (Clarence Brooks) has doubts and sets out to prove the man’s innocence. Inspired by a notorious crime that took place in the state of Georgia in 1913, Micheaux’s film remains a timely indictment of institutional racism.  
DIRECTOR: Oscar Micheaux.
WRITTEN BY: Oscar Micheaux.
CAST: Clarence Brooks, Dorothy Van Engle, Andrew Bishop, Alec Lovejoy.
1935. 98 min. USA. B&W. English. DCP.
Restored in 2021 by the George Eastman Museum and Cineteca di Bologna in association with the Film Foundation, Quoiat Films and Sky, from a 35mm nitrate print in the SMU/Tyler Film Collection, SMU Libraries, deposited at the George Eastman Museum. Restoration was performed at George Eastman Museum Film Preservation Services and L’Immagine Ritrovata laboratory.


The Blood of Jesus with Hell-Bound Train
Fri, Sep 2 | 7:30pm | Ted Mann Theater

The Blood of Jesus
The prolific screen actor Spencer Williams also wrote, produced, and directed a series of independent films, shot in and around Dallas, with all-Black casts. The Blood of Jesus is the first of these—a religious allegory about a woman (Cathryn Caviness) who is trapped on the crossroads of the hereafter after being accidentally shot by her husband (Williams). A low-budget stylist, Williams’s rustic passion play, set in the contemporary world of juke joints, was one of the first Black-directed films named to the National Film Registry. 
DIRECTOR: Spencer Williams.
WRITTEN BY: Spencer Williams.
CAST: Cathryn Caviness, Spencer Williams, Juanita Riley, Reather Hardeman.
1941. 68 min. USA. B&W. English. DCP.

Hell-Bound Train
A recent major discovery, Hell-Bound Train was made by self-taught 16mm filmmakers James and Eloyce Gist, African American evangelists who employed cinema as a tool for their traveling ministry. Their unique visual allegories were screened in churches and meeting halls, accompanied by a sermon and the passing of a collection plate. Decades before Snowpiercer (2013), the Gists use the cars of a doomed convoy as social metaphors—here the sins of the Jazz Age such as gambling, jazz, alcohol, and skipping church are staged in different train cars, all presided over by an eerily masked devil. Now featuring a newly created score by Dr. Samuel Waymon, best known to cineastes as having provided the moody music (and portrayed the minister/chauffeur) in Bill Gunn’s influential 1973 film Ganja & Hess
DIRECTORS: Eloyce Gist, James Gist.
WRITTEN BY: Eloyce Gist, James Gist. 
1930. 50 min. USA. B&W. English. DCP.


Stormy Weather with The Duke is Tops
Sat, Sep 3 | 7:30pm | Ted Mann Theater

Stormy Weather
Nearly retired tap dancer Bill “Corky” Williamson (screen and stage legend Bill “Bojangles” Robinson) recounts the welcome that he and his 15th New York Regiment band received when they returned from Europe after World War I—and the young lady he met that night—in this star-studded studio musical. Brimming with over twenty songs, Stormy Weather features performances from Cab Calloway; the Nicholas Brothers (Fayard and Harold), who defy gravity with a mind-boggling staircase dance routine; Fats Waller; and Lena Horne, who plays the young Corky’s girlfriend in a star-making performance.
DIRECTOR: Andrew L. Stone.
WRITTEN BY: Frederick Jackson, Ted Koehler.
ADAPTATION BY: H.S. Kraft.
CAST: Lena Horne, Bill Robinson, Cab Calloway, Katherine Dunham.
1943. 78 min. USA. B&W. English. DCP.

The Duke Is Tops
Lena Horne was only 21 when she made her screen debut as a Broadway-bound ingenue whose ascent mirrors the descent of her former producer and one-time beau Ralph Cooper. Punctuated by musical and dancing routines from almost forgotten performers such as the Basin Street Boys, Willie Covan, and Rubberneck Holmes, The Duke Is Tops also finds The Flying Ace (1926) star Laurence Criner giving a memorable turn as the flamboyant Doc Dorando. 
DIRECTOR: William L. Nolte.
WRITTEN BY: Phil Dunham.
CAST: Ralph Cooper, Lena Horne, Laurence Criner, Monte Hawley. 
1938. 74 min. USA. B&W. English. DCP.
Digital restoration courtesy of the UCLA Film & Television Archive.


Dirty Gertie from Harlem U.S.A. with The Girl from Chicago
Thu, Sep 8 | 7:30pm | Ted Mann Theater

Dirty Gertie from Harlem U.S.A.
Spencer Williams imagines W. Somerset Maugham’s “Miss Thompson” as a Caribbean cabaret fable. While on the fictional island of Rinidad to escape her Harlem past, American Gertie LaRue (Francine Everett) becomes an object of fixation by locals and expats alike—among them a duo of pious missionaries and a sailor who goes by Tight Pants—when she debuts as a nightclub headliner. Williams himself stars in the bit part of the “voodoo woman” Old Hager, a gender-fluid character decades ahead of its time.
DIRECTOR: Spencer Williams.
WRITTEN BY: True T. Thompson.
CAST: Francine Everett, Don Wilson, Kathrine Moore, Alfred Hawkins.
1946. 60 min. USA. B&W. English. DCP.
Restored by UCLA Film & Television Archive and The Film Foundation, with funding provided by the Hobson/Lucas Family Foundation.

The Girl from Chicago
United States Secret Service agent Alonso White must go undercover in Mississippi on a classified assignment. There he meets and falls for the preacher’s daughter. Trouble is, she is being subjected to harassment from the same local crime lord Alonso was sent to investigate. The Girl from Chicago is punctuated by lively musical numbers. The film’s narrative looseness, further unmoored by the use of title cards, also lends the film the tone of a surreal dreamscape. 
DIRECTOR: Oscar Micheaux.
WRITTEN BY: Oscar Micheaux.
CAST: Carl Mahon, Starr Calloway, Alice B. Russell, Eunice Brooks.
1932. 70 min. USA. B&W. English. Digital.


No Way Out with Native Son
Fri, Sep 9 | 7:30pm | Ted Mann Theater

No Way Out
Sidney Poitier was in his early 20s when he made his big-screen debut in this searing drama about a Black doctor who must provide treatment to a pair of racist brothers shot while committing a robbery. When one of the brothers dies in the care of Poitier, the other (Richard Widmark) accuses him of murder and writer-director Joseph Mankiewicz keeps ratcheting up the tension. An Academy Award®-nominee for Writing (Story and Screenplay) where Mankiewicz improbably competed against himself for his other release that year (All About Eve, for which he won), No Way Out also marks the first time that Ossie Davis and Ruby Dee appeared together on-screen. An unflinching look into the resolute face of racism, No Way Out remains all too relevant.
DIRECTOR: Joseph L. Mankiewicz.
WRITTEN BY: Joseph L. Mankiewicz, Lesser Samuels.
CAST: Richard Widmark, Linda Darnell, Stephen McNally, Sidney Poitier.
1950. 106 min. USA. B&W. English. DCP.

Native Son
Richard Wright stars in this hypnotically bleak noir adaptation of his own best-selling, controversial novel of the same name about Chicago chauffeur Bigger Thomas whose violent impulses and moral confusion are the inevitable result of generations of institutionalized racism. A lavish Argentinian production directed by Pierre Chenal, an exiled Belgian Jew, Native Son was made entirely outside the American film industry and was heavily censored when it originally screened in the United States. A complete 16mm print of the original Argentinian release and an incomplete 35mm duplicate negative of the uncensored cut were combined for the current restoration, the most complete version of the film ever shown in this country.
DIRECTOR: Pierre Chenal.
WRITTEN BY: Pierre Chenal, Richard Wright.
CAST: Richard Wright, Jean Wallace, Gloria Madison, Nicholas Joy.
1951. 104 min. Argentina. B&W. English. 35mm.
Preserved by the Library of Congress.


Odds Against Tomorrow with The World, the Flesh and the Devil
Sat, Sep 10 | 7:30pm | Ted Mann Theater

Odds Against Tomorrow
Harry Belafonte stars in this stylish noir that finds him squaring off against Robert Ryan, a tightly wound racist with a sadistic streak and dark past. The pair are thrown together by Ed Begley to commit a bank heist to repay their respective debts. With memorable supporting performances by Shelley Winters, Gloria Grahame, and Kim Hamilton; stunning high-contrast widescreen cinematography; a potent score by jazz pianist John Lewis; and a hard-bit tone of desperation, Robert Wise’s film was so beloved by French crime auteur Jean-Pierre Melville that it’s said he watched it between 80 and 120 times.
DIRECTOR: Robert Wise.
WRITTEN BY: Abraham Polonsky, Nelson Gidding.
CAST: Harry Belafonte, Robert Ryan, Shelley Winters, Ed Begley.
1959. 96 min. USA. B&W. English. 35mm.

The World, the Flesh and the Devil
Belafonte is one of the last survivors of a nuclear disaster wandering an eerily vacant Manhattan. When he finds fellow survivors, both white—played by Inger Stevens and Mel Ferrer, respectively—tensions surface. Loosely based on the 1901 novel The Purple Cloud, the film’s haunting premise is not so much the devastation and destruction of war but the racial and gender mores that somehow persist even as the world is ending. Rendered in striking black-and-white CinemaScope, The World, The Flesh and the Devil is an underappreciated cult classic. The film is also the first made in partnership with Belafonte’s own HARBEL productions.
DIRECTOR: Ranald MacDougall.
WRITTEN BY: Ranald MacDougall.
CAST: Harry Belafonte, Inger Stevens, Mel Ferrer.
1959. 95 min. USA. B&W. Scope. English. 35mm.


A Raisin in the Sun with The Learning Tree
Fri, Sep 23 | 7:30pm | Ted Mann Theater

A Raisin in the Sun
Lorraine Hansberry’s play about a family’s struggles to improve their status after the death of their patriarch was the first work by a Black female playwright to be produced on Broadway. Hansberry adapted her own work for this faithful film version which reunited nearly the entire stage cast, including such top acting talent as Claudia McNeil and Sidney Poitier as the clashing mother and son, Ruby Dee as Poitier’s wife, as well as Ivan Dixon, Louis Gossett Jr., and Diana Sands.
DIRECTOR: Daniel Petrie.
WRITTEN BY: Lorraine Hansberry.
CAST: Sidney Poitier, Claudia McNeil, Ruby Dee, Diana Sands.
1961. 128 min. USA. B&W. English. DCP.

The Learning Tree
Photojournalist Gordon Parks was the first Black person to helm a Hollywood studio production with this film, also his feature directorial debut. In his mid-50s at the time of its production, Parks renders his childhood in rural Kansas—don’t miss the nods to The Wizard of Oz (1939)—while adapting his semi-autobiographical novel of the same name. With gorgeous Panavision lensing by veteran noir cinematographer Burnett Guffey, Parks eloquently renders the story of young a boy who learns the hard lessons of first love (and sex), life, death, and racism. 
DIRECTOR: Gordon Parks.
WRITTEN BY: Gordon Parks.
CAST: Kyle Johnson, Alex Clarke, Estelle Evans, Dana Elcar.
1969. 107 min. USA. Color. Scope. English. DCP.


La permission (The Story of a Three-Day Pass) with Nothing but a Man
Sat, Sep 24 | 7:30pm | Ted Mann Theater

La permission (The Story of a Three-Day Pass)
Melvin Van Peebles’s edgy, angsty, romantic first feature could never have been made in the United States. Unable to break into a segregated Hollywood, Van Peebles decamped to France, taught himself the language, and wrote several books in French, one of which, La permission , would be the source for his stylistically innovative feature debut. Turner (Harry Baird), an African American soldier stationed in France, is granted a promotion and a three-day leave from base by his casually racist commanding officer and heads to Paris, where he finds whirlwind romance with a white woman (Nicole Berger)—but what happens to their love when his furlough is over? Channeling the brash exuberance of the French New Wave, Van Peebles creates an exploration of the psychology of an interracial relationship as well as a commentary on France’s contradictory attitudes about race that is playful, sarcastic, and stingingly subversive by turns, and that laid the foundation for the scorched-earth cinematic revolution he would unleash just a few years later with Sweet Sweetback’s Baadasssss Song (1971).
DIRECTOR: Melvin Van Peebles.
WRITTEN BY: Melvin Van Peebles.
CAST: Harry Baird, Pierre Doris, Christian Marin, Nicole Berger.
1968. 87 min. France. B&W. French, English. DCP.
New 4K restoration by IndieCollect in consultation with Mario Van Peebles, with support from the Hollywood Foreign Press Association.

Nothing but a Man
Directed by expat Michael Roemer after an NAACP-funded three-month research trip to the American South, Nothing but a Man is an unforgettable piece of American independent cinema. Ivan Dixon stars as a railroad worker whose burgeoning activism threatens his relationship with a preacher’s daughter in a small rural town. Made amid the turmoil of the summer of 1963, which included the murder of civil rights activist Medgar Evers and the March on Washington, Nothing but a Man also introduces audiences to Yaphet Kotto in his screen debut and Gloria Foster, who later became known for playing The Oracle in The Matrix (1999). 
DIRECTOR: Michael Roemer.
WRITTEN BY: Michael Roemer, Robert Young.
CAST: Ivan Dixon, Abbey Lincoln, Gloria Foster, Julius Harris.
1964. 92 min. USA. B&W. English. 35mm.
Preserved by the Library of Congress.


Sweet Sweetback’s Baadasssss Song with Black Chariot
Thu, Sep 29 | 7:30pm | Ted Mann Theater

Sweet Sweetback’s Baadasssss Song
A landmark of Black and American independent cinema that would send shock waves through the culture, Sweet Sweetback’s Baadasssss Song was Melvin Van Peebles’s second feature film, after he walked away from a contract with Columbia in order to make his next film on his own terms. Acting as producer, director, writer, composer, editor, and star, Van Peebles created the prototype for what Hollywood would eventually co-opt and make into the blaxploitation hero: a taciturn, perpetually blank-faced performer in a sex show, who, when he’s pushed too far by a pair of racist cops looking to frame him for a crime he didn’t commit, goes on the run through a lawless LA underground of bikers, revolutionaries, sex workers, and hippies in a kill-or-be-killed quest for liberation from white oppression. Sweet Sweetback’s Baadasssss Song ’s incendiary politics are matched by Van Peebles’s revolutionary style, in which jagged jump cuts, kaleidoscopic superimpositions, and psychedelic sound design come together in a sustained howl of rage and defiance.
DIRECTOR: Melvin Van Peebles.
WRITTEN BY: Melvin Van Peebles.
CAST: Melvin Van Peebles, Bruce Adams, Michael Augustus, John Allen.
1971. 97 min. USA. Color. English. DCP.

Black Chariot
Robert Goodwin wrote, produced, and directed this lost gem of American independent cinema. Opening during a tense meeting between members of an underground Black Power group that leads to a stunning foot chase, Goodwin’s film weaves past and present to tell the story of the social awakening of a character only referred to as “the drifter” (Bernie Casey). Shot on both 35mm and video and boasting a fierce, early performance from L.A. Rebellion icon Barbara O. Jones, Black Chariot is a fascinatingly iconoclastic revelation. Though world-premiered at the Santa Monica Civic Auditorium in 1971, Black Chariot has remained under-screened for decades—until now.
DIRECTOR: Robert L. Goodwin.
WRITTEN BY: Robert L. Goodwin.
CAST: Bernie Casey, Barbara O. Jones, Richard Elkins, Pauline Myers.
1971. 90 min. USA. Color. English. 35mm.
Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, Gift of the family of Robert L. Goodwin Sr. 
Preservation of Black Chariot made possible by a generous grant from the National Film Preservation Foundation. Additional funding by the Earl W. and Amanda Stafford Center for African American Media Arts (CAAMA).

About Regeneration: Black Cinema, 1898–1971
Regeneration: Black Cinema 1898–1971 explores the visual culture of Black cinema in its manifold expressions, from its early days to just after the civil rights movement. The exhibition is an in-depth look at Black participation in American filmmaking. Regeneration highlights the work of African American filmmakers and creates dialogues with visual artists while simultaneously expanding discussions surrounding US film history. Regeneration: Black Cinema 1898–1971 is co-organized by Doris Berger (Senior Director of Curatorial Affairs, Academy Museum) and Rhea L. Combs (Director of Curatorial Affairs, National Portrait Gallery). 

Exhibition Credits: Regeneration: Black Cinema 1898–1971 is the recipient of the 2018 Sotheby’s Prize. The Sotheby’s Prize was founded to support and encourage museums to break new ground by recognizing curatorial excellence and facilitating an upcoming exhibition that explores overlooked or underrepresented art history. The Sotheby’s Prize was awarded by a jury of museum curators and directors comprising Sir Nicholas Serota, Donna De Salvo, Okwui Enwezor (1963–2019), Connie Butler, Emilie Gordenker, and chaired by Allan Schwartzman. Regeneration is made possible in part by major grants from the National Endowment for the Humanities. Technology solutions generously provided by Christie®. Lead support provided by Campari®. Generous support provided by the National Endowment for the Arts, J.P. Morgan Private Bank, the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors through the Los Angeles County Department of Arts and Culture, and Octavia Spencer. Support also provided by Sybil Robson Orr, Daniel Allen Sims and Althea R. Miller-Sims, Lyndon J. Barrois Sr. and Janine Sherman Barrois, Chaz Hammel-Smith Ebert and Rogerebert.com, Morgan Freeman, Lori McCreary and Revelations Entertainment, Max and Kahlia Konan, Emma Koss, Alana Mayo, Mary Parent and Javier Chapa, Nina Shaw and Wallace Little, and Yeardley Smith. Exhibition programs are made possible in part by California Humanities, a non-profit partner of the National Endowment for the Humanities. Academy Film Archive restorations are funded in part by grants from the National Endowment for the Arts and the Capital Group Companies Charitable Foundation. Academy Museum Digital Engagement Platform sponsored by Bloomberg Philanthropies.            

About the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures
The Academy Museum is the largest museum in the United States devoted to the arts, sciences, and artists of moviemaking. The museum advances the understanding, celebration, and preservation of cinema through inclusive and accessible exhibitions, screenings, programs, initiatives, and collections. Designed by Pritzker Prize-winning architect Renzo Piano, the museum’s campus contains the restored and revitalized historic Saban Building—formerly known as the May Company building (1939)—and a soaring spherical addition. Together, these buildings contain 50,000 square feet of exhibition spaces, two state-of-the-art theaters, the Shirley Temple Education Studio, and beautiful public spaces that are free and open to the public. These include: The Walt Disney Company Piazza and the Sidney Poitier Grand Lobby, which houses the Spielberg Family Gallery, Academy Museum Store, and Fanny’s restaurant and café. The Academy Museum exhibition galleries are open seven days a week, with hours Sunday through Thursday from 10am to 6pm and Friday and Saturday from 10am to 8pm.

Image credits: L-R Paul Robeson in The Emperor Jones (1933); Louise Beavers, Monte Hawley and Reginald Fenderson in a scene from Reform School (1932); Barbara O. Jones and Bernie Casey, in a scene from Black Chariot (1971); The Nicholas Brothers in a scene from Stormy Weather (1943), Fayard Nicholas, left, and Harold Nicholas, in Stormy Weather (1950). Courtesy Margaret Herrick Library, © Twentieth Century Fox. 

Meet the New Director and President of the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures.

ACADEMY MUSEUM OF MOTION PICTURES APPOINTS JACQUELINE STEWART AS DIRECTOR AND PRESIDENT.

Los Angeles, Calif. July 6, 2022—The Board of Trustees of the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures today announced the appointment of Jacqueline Stewart as the institution’s Director and President. One of the world’s leading scholars, curators, and public educators on cinema, she was appointed in 2020 as Chief Artistic and Programming Officer of the museum. She assumes her duties as Director and President on July 18 and will guide the vision of the Academy Museum and oversee all aspects of its operations.

She succeeds Bill Kramer, who was appointed CEO of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences last week.

Ted Sarandos, Chair of the Academy Museum’s Board of Trustees and Co-CEO of Netflix, said, “The Board warmly and unanimously agrees that Jacqueline Stewart is the ideal choice to lead the Academy Museum into the future. A strong and inspiring partner to Bill Kramer throughout the period leading up to our opening, she gave indispensable direction to the curatorial program that has been so widely admired. Her assumption of the role of Director and President is a testament to both the intellectual heft of the Academy Museum and its institutional strength.”

Bill Kramer said, “It has been a great privilege to work hand-in-hand with Jacqueline as we opened the Academy Museum. I am thrilled that we will continue to collaborate in our two new roles. I know the museum will thrive thanks to her rare combination of expertise, creativity, and proven leadership. Like movie fans everywhere, I am so thankful to have her guide the future of the Academy Museum.” 

Jacqueline Stewart said, “Our ambition in opening the Academy Museum was to give Los Angeles and the world an unprecedented institution for understanding and appreciating the history and culture of cinema, in all its artistic glory and all its power to influence and reflect society. I feel deeply honored to have been chosen for this new role and look forward to working with our Board of Trustees, our COO and General Counsel Brendan Connell Jr., our wonderfully talented staff, and with Bill Kramer and the Academy, as we continue to advance our mission.”

As Chief Artistic and Programming Officer, Stewart has led strategy and planning for the Academy Museum’s curatorial, educational, and public programming initiatives, including exhibitions, screenings, symposia, publications, workshops, youth programs, and the Academy Museum Podcast. Honored in 2021 as a MacArthur Foundation Fellow, she was a 2019 senior fellow at the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC) and was inducted into the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2018.  She holds an appointment as Professor of Cinema and Media Studies at the University of Chicago, and previously served on the faculty of Northwestern University.

Stewart’s work in expanding public understanding of cinema and bringing film history to life has included her award-winning book Migrating to the Movies: Cinema and Black Urban Modernity, a study of African Americans and silent cinema, and her co-editorship of L.A. Rebellion: Creating a New Black Cinema, and William Greaves: Filmmaking as Mission. She is host of “Silent Sunday Nights” on Turner Classic Movies and co-curated the video collection Pioneers of African American Cinema for Kino Lorber. A native of Chicago’s South Side, Stewart founded the South Side Home Movie Project in 2005 to preserve, digitize, and screen amateur footage documenting everyday life from the perspectives of South Side residents.

A passionate film archivist and advocate for film preservation, she is chair of the National Film Preservation Board, where she led the drafting of reports on diversity, equity, and inclusion on the National Film Registry and in the film archival profession, and has also served on the Boards of Chicago Film Archives, the Society for Cinema and Media Studies, and the Association of Moving Image Archivists.

Stewart’s research has been supported by institutions including the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture of the New York Public Library, the Shelby Cullom Davis Center for Historical Studies at Princeton University, the Kluge Center at the Library of Congress, the Franke Institute for the Humanities at the University of Chicago, and the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Stewart earned her BA in English from Stanford University and her PhD in English from the University of Chicago. She studied moving image archiving at UCLA and the Cineteca di Bologna in Italy.


###


About the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures
The Academy Museum is the largest museum in the United States devoted to the arts, sciences, and artists of moviemaking. The museum advances the understanding, celebration, and preservation of cinema through inclusive and accessible exhibitions, screenings, programs, initiatives, and collections. Designed by Pritzker Prize-winning architect Renzo Piano, the museum’s campus contains the restored and revitalized historic Saban Building—formerly known as the May Company building (1939)—and a soaring spherical addition. Together, these buildings contain 50,000 square feet of exhibition spaces, two state-of-the-art theaters, the Shirley Temple Education Studio, and beautiful public spaces that are free and open to the public. These include: The Walt Disney Company Piazza and the Sidney Poitier Grand Lobby, which houses the Spielberg Family Gallery, Academy Museum Store, and Fanny’s restaurant and café. The Academy Museum exhibition galleries are open seven days a week, with hours Sunday through Thursday from 10am to 6pm and Friday and Saturday from 10am to 8pm.

BILL KRAMER NAMED CEO OF THE ACADEMY OF MOTION PICTURE ARTS AND SCIENCES.

Los Angeles, Calif. – The Board of Governors of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences voted today to name Bill Kramer, current Director and President of the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures, as its new CEO, following the departure of Dawn Hudson after 11 years of esteemed service. 


Kramer will lead the global membership, the Oscars, the institution’s education and emerging talent initiatives, the Academy’s extensive collections housed in the Margaret Herrick Library and Academy Film Archive, and the Academy Museum and its ongoing calendar of exhibitions, screenings, educational and public programs, and retail operations.

In his current role, Kramer was responsible for successfully opening the Academy Museum in September 2021. The museum has sold more than 550,000 tickets in its first nine months in operation. Under Kramer’s direction, the museum successfully developed five floors of world-class exhibitions devoted to the arts and sciences of moviemaking and formalized channels between Academy members and the museum for overall content creation.

In addition, Kramer and his museum team developed the Academy’s first permanent retail store, both in the museum and online, generating sales of more than $5.5MM to date. Under Kramer’s leadership, the museum created the Academy’s first global publications imprint that launched with a Hayao Miyazaki catalog, which is currently in its fourth print run, and with a Spike Lee book to be issued this month. Kramer and the museum’s programming team developed the Academy’s first robust public screenings series with more than 40 programs presented each month, including Branch Selects, a screening series co-created with the Academy’s 17 member branches.

To ensure the financial health of the museum, Kramer oversaw the completion of the $388 million fundraising campaign that launched the museum project and established an ongoing $40 million annual operating revenue program that includes an annual gala, ticket sales, museum membership, and more.

“Bill Kramer has been a transformational leader in establishing the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures as a beacon for movie lovers and a manifestation of everything the Academy represents and celebrates. His vision for the Academy’s future is likewise bold and inspiring, and our governors have agreed he is the ideal choice to lead at this pivotal moment for the organization. We believe Bill has the ability to bring together all corners of the motion picture community, and we’re thrilled to have him in this role to elevate the organization and unite our global membership,” said Academy President David Rubin. “I cannot stress enough the deep respect and appreciation we have for the groundbreaking achievements Dawn Hudson has brought to the Academy during her eleven years as CEO.  She initiated unprecedented efforts to create more space for diverse voices, both within the membership and our industry.  She was tireless in shepherding our long-awaited museum to its opening and has fortified the Academy’s financial stability, allowing us to develop programs and provide mentoring for those in front of and behind the camera. Our gratitude for her accomplishments and guidance is beyond measure.”

“What a privilege it’s been to work with an exceptionally talented staff and dedicated board members to create a truly global institution, a world-class museum that honors this art form so beautifully, an abiding commitment to representation and inclusion, and a modern organization ready to lead in a changing world,” said Hudson. “I’ve worked with Bill for close to a decade, and no executive is more innovative, more connected to artists, or more passionate about the opportunities that lie ahead than he is. The Academy and the Academy Museum are in the best of hands.”

Chair of the Academy Museum Board of Trustees and Netflix Co-CEO Ted Sarandos said, “The Academy Museum Board of Trustees is thrilled that Bill will be continuing his work with us as the CEO of the Academy and as a Trustee of the Museum Board. The museum’s opening has been a resounding success, and I look forward to working with Bill to help further amplify the museum’s robust programs and create a unifying and strategic vision for the future.”

“It is the great honor of my career to take on the role as CEO of the Academy,” said Bill Kramer. “I deeply believe in the power and artistry of cinema. I so look forward to galvanizing the unparalleled assets of the Academy—the Oscars, our global community of more than 10,000 Academy members, and our museum, library, and archive—to promote and elevate the arts and sciences of the movies and inspire the next generation of filmmakers. I am deeply grateful for this opportunity and for the incredible work of my colleagues Brendan Connell, Jr. and Jacqueline Stewart, who will continue the exceptional work of the Academy Museum.”

During his earlier tenure as managing director of the Academy Museum, Kramer served as the chief planning, public relations, advancement, exhibitions, and government relations officer for the museum’s pre-construction phase, successfully leading the project’s fundraising campaign and managing the project’s public approvals process. Kramer also oversaw the production of the museum’s first exhibition, Hollywood Costume, which explored the central role that costume design plays in cinematic storytelling and featured more than 100 iconic movie costumes.

Prior to returning to the Academy Museum in 2019, Kramer served as vice president of development at the Brooklyn Academy of Music (BAM), one of America’s most institutionally and programmatically diverse arts institutions, where he led a 45-person team tasked with raising significant private and government funding, overseeing a visual art expansion program, and platforming BAM’s growing film program to an international audience.

Kramer has led capital and comprehensive campaigns for the Southern California Institute of Architecture (SCI-Arc) and the California Institute of the Arts (CalArts) and has served in senior business and fundraising positions at the Sundance Institute, Rhode Island School of Design (RISD), and Columbia University School of the Arts.

Kramer will assume his new role on July 18. Hudson will remain with the Academy as an advisor during the transition period. The appointment of a new Director of the Academy Museum is currently being addressed by the Museum Board of Trustees and the Academy Foundation Board and will be announced in the near future.


ABOUT THE ACADEMY
The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences is a global community of more than 10,000 of the most accomplished artists, filmmakers and executives working in film. In addition to celebrating and recognizing excellence in filmmaking through the Oscars, the Academy supports a wide range of initiatives to promote the art and science of the movies, including public programming, educational outreach and the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures.

Upcoming Film, Education, and Public Programs at the Academy Museum.

June –July Film, Education, and Public Programs

Los Angeles, Calif. – This summer, the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures launches the film series Summer of Love, celebrating big screen romances from the 1990s, including Love Jones (1997), a new 4K restoration of Mississippi Masala (1991), Sleepless in Seattle (1993) and much more. The museum will also be the exclusive Los Angeles venue for the first-ever US retrospective of Hungarian screenwriter and director Márta Mészáros; as well as 40th anniversary screenings of cult classic fantasy film The Last Unicorn (1982), with author/screenwriter Peter Beagle in attendance for a Q&A, and groundbreaking gay romance Making Love (1982)—with a Q&A featuring A. Scott Berg, Barry Sandler, and Harry Hamlin.

On June 3, teens are invited to a screen-printing poster workshop with Self Help Graphics & Art, and later that evening, at 7pm in the David Geffen Theater, activists Dolores Huerta and Eva Longoria will be in conversation on how film can have an impact on social change. On June 26, Carlos López Estrada will discuss poetry and the inspirations behind his film Summertime (2020). Our June Calm Morning program—our sensory-friendly activities—and accommodative screening, will focus on early cinema through explorations of our exhibition The Path to Cinema: Highlights from the Richard Balzer Collection, while July will focus on the fantastical worlds.

Films are shown in 35mm, 70mm, and digital laser projection in our beautiful 288-seat Ted Mann Theater (TMT) and 1,000-seat David Geffen Theater (DGT). In some cases, films have been restored by the Academy Film Archive or another film partner. Select screenings include introductions, Q&As, and/or special guests, so please check our website for updates, download our digital film guide, or follow us @academymuseumscreenings on Instagram.

Education and Public Programs

Activism and Film: Dolores Huerta and Eva Longoria in Conversation
Fri, Jun 3 | 7pm | DGT
Exploring the intersections of activism and filmmaking, American labor leader and civil rights activist Dolores Huerta will be in conversation with actress, producer, director, entrepreneur, and activist Eva Longoria. The Walt Disney Company Piazza will be activated with music and local food vendors and a poster screen-printing workshop with Self Help Graphics & Art for teens leading up to the talk.

My Place in the Sun
Book Signing | Fri, Jun 10 | 5pm | Academy Museum Store
In the book My Place in the Sun: Life in the Golden Age of Hollywood and Washington, George Stevens Jr. emerges from the shadow of his celebrated Hollywood director father to claim his own place as a visionary force in American culture. Join us at the Academy Museum Store for a book signing with author George Stevens Jr.

Building Character: Animation
Sat, June 11 | 6pm | TMT
Learn about the process of creating a character in animation with Renato dos Anjos and Kira Lethtomaki (EncantoWreck-It Ralph).

Grease: The Directors Notebook
Book Signing | Sat, Jun 11 | 1pm | Academy Museum Store
Released more than four decades ago, Grease (1978) is one of the highest-grossing musical films of all time and a bona fide global sensation with legions of devoted fans across generations. Join us at the Academy Museum Store for a book signing with Grease director Randal Kleiser.

Film and Poetry with Carlos López Estrada and Get Lit
Sun, Jun 26 | 5pm | TMT
Academy Award-nominated director Carlos López Estrada will talk about the influence and inclusion of poetry in his films. He will discuss his film Summertime (2020)—a collaboration with the youth poetry organization Get Lit. An accompanying poetry workshop for teens will be facilitated by poets from Get Lit, during which teens can create poems about themselves, their communities, and their relationship to their city.

Calm Mornings
Ongoing
Calm Mornings is an ongoing monthly program that creates an environment for all visitors to enjoy less-sensory-stimulating spaces with moderated sound and lighting displays. In June, visitors are invited to explore the magic of pre-cinematic optical toys before an 11am accommodative screening of Martin Scorsese’s Hugo (2011) in the Ted Mann Theater. The July program will encourage visitor to explore fantastical worlds featured in our Stories of Cinema exhibition, followed by the 11am accommodative screening of The Red Turtle (2016) in the Ted Mann Theater.

Film Programs

Summer of Love: 1990s Romances
June 2–July 30
The 1990s saw the release of many iconic romance films that forged paths for ones to come by pushing the boundaries of the genre. From the comic to the repressed, the doomed to the joyfully queer, the last decade of the 20th century expanded conventional notions of love. We invite you to come spend this summer of love with us. The series kicks off with a 4K restoration of Mississippi Masala (1991) with an introduction by community partner Visual Communications.

Mississippi Masala
Thu, Jun 2 | 7:30pm | TMT | DCP

But I’m a Cheerleader with Point Break
Sat, Jun 4 | 7:30pm | TMT | DCP

The Age of Innocence
Fri, Jun 17 | 7:30pm | TMT | 35mm

The Watermelon Woman with Greetings from Africa
Sat, Jun 18 | 7:30pm | TMT | DCP

The Best Man
Sun, Jun 19 | 2pm | TMT | 35mm

Love Jones
Fri, Jun 24 | 7:30pm | TMT | 35mm

My Own Private Idaho
Thu, Jun 30 | 7:30pm | TMT | 35mm

Before Sunrise
Fri, Jul 1 | 7:30pm | TMT | 35mmSleepless in Seattle
Fri, Jul 8 | 7:30pm | TMT | 35mm

Double Happiness with Beau Travail
Sat, Jul 9 | 7:30pm | TMT | DCP

Happy Together with Chungking Express
Fri, Jul 15 | 7:30pm | TMT | DCP

Out of Sight
Sat, Jul 16 | 7:30pm | TMT | 35mm

Clueless
Fri, Jul 22 | 7:30pm | TMT | 35mm

Jerry Maguire
Fri, Jul 29 | 7:30pm | TMT | 35mm

Strictly Ballroom with Romeo + Juliet
Sat, Jul 30 | 7:30pm | TMT | 35mm
Márta Mészáros
June 3–July 7
The Academy Museum is honored to show the West Coast debut of the first US retrospective of pioneering Hungarian filmmaker Márta Mészáros. The series includes 11 titles, complete with Diary for My Children, which won the Grand Prix at Cannes.
The Girl with  Binding Sentiments
Fri, Jun 3 | 7:30pm | TMT | DCP

Don’t Cry, Pretty Girls! with Riddance
Thu, Jun 9 | 7:30pm | TMT | DCP

Adoption with Nine Months
Fri, Jun 10 | 7:30pm | TMT | DCP

The Heiresses with The Two of Them
Thu, Jun 16 | 7:30pm | TMT | DCP

Diary for My Children with Diary for My Lovers
Sat, Jun 25 | 7:30pm | TMT | DCP

Diary for My Mother and Father
Thu, Jul 7 | 7:30pm | TMT | DCP
Special Screenings

A Trip to the Moon and Other Trips through Time and Space…with Serge Bromberg
Sat, Jun 11 | 7:30pm | TMT
Serge Bromberg presents his most astounding film discoveries in a unique one-man-show, accompanying these rare films on the piano, honoring the way they were originally featured. In addition, Bromberg speaks about the origin of the films—and in these stories, fact is often stranger than fiction.

Making Love
Thu, Jun 23 | 7:30pm | TMT | DCP
This 40th anniversary screening of the groundbreaking film, which tells the story of a man coming to terms with his sexuality, will be followed by a Q&A with A. Scott Berg, Barry Sandler, and Harry Hamlin.

The Last Unicorn
Sat, Jul 30 | 3pm | DGT | DCP
Voiced by actors Mia Farrow, Alan Arkin, Jeff Bridges, and Angela Lansbury, this animated fantasy film also celebrates its 40th anniversary. Screenwriter and author Peter S. Beagle and producer Michael Chase Walker will be on hand for a Q&A.
Family Matinees
Ongoing
Every Saturday, the Academy Museum screens films for families of all ages. All movies in this series are rated G or PG, unless otherwise noted. The final Family Matinee of every month is an accommodative screening where we offer open captioning, keep the theater dimly lit, and maintain a lower volume for neurodivergent viewers. This June, the programming is celebrating LACMA’s exhibition City of Cinema: Paris 1895–1907 by taking a journey back to the dawn of cinema in the City of Lights. In July, programming will feature Academy Award-honored family-friendly summer movies.
Hugo in 3D
Sat, Jun 4 | 11am | TMT | DCP

Shorts Program: The Mysterious Screen
Sat, Jun 11 | 11am | TMT

Shorts Program: The Magic Cinema of Georges Méliès
Sat, Jun 18 | 11am | TMT

Hugo (Accommodative Screening)
Sat, Jun 25 | 11am | TMT | DCP

The Princess Bride
Sat, Jul 2 | 11am | TMT | 35mmDick Tracy
Sat, Jul 9 | 11am | TMT | 35mm

Babe
Sat, Jul 16 | 11am | TMT | 35mm

Tim Burton’s Corpse Bride
Sat, Jul 23 | 11am | TMT | 35mm

The Red Turtle (Accommodative Screening)
Sat, Jul 30 | 11am | TMT | DCP

The Academy Museum’s 2021–2022 programming is made possible by the support of our generous partners, including:

Museum film programming generously funded by the Richard Roth Foundation. Participant in support of programs that engage diverse audiences in the intersection of art and activism. Ruderman Family Foundation in support of Academy Museum inclusion initiatives and programming. Cinecittà in support of an annual programming series of Italian Cinema. Gigi Pritzker Pucker and the Pritzker Foundation in generous support of social impact programs. Alfred P. Sloan Foundation in support of Academy Museum programs focused on science and technology in film and the science and technology of film. Donors to our fund in support of AAPI programming, including Esther S. M. Chui-Chao, Julia and Ken Gouw, and Dr. Peter Lam Kin Ngok of Media Asia Group Holdings Limited. The generous support of Televisa Foundation-Univision in celebration of Mexican Cinema. Jacob Andreou and Carly Steel in support of Halloween film screenings.

FINAL DAYS TO VIEW HAYAO MIYAZAKI AT THE ACADEMY MUSEUM.

Acclaimed Exhibition Closes Sunday, June 5

Los Angeles, Calif. – Hayao Miyazaki, the Academy Museum’s acclaimed exhibition, will close on June 5, 2022. Marking the first museum retrospective in North America dedicated to the legendary filmmaker and his work, the exhibition has been on view since the museum’s opening on September 30, 2021.

Presented in the museum’s Marilyn and Jeffrey Katzenberg Gallery on Level 4, the exhibition features approximately 300 objects from Miyazaki’s animated feature films, including My Neighbor Totoro (1988) and the Academy Award®-winning Spirited Away (2001).

Thematically organized in seven sections, the exhibition is designed as a journey. Visitors travel through Miyazaki’s six-decade career via a dynamic presentation of original imageboards, character designs, storyboards, layouts, backgrounds, posters, and animation cels, as well as large-scale projections of film clips and immersive environments. June 5 is the last day visitors will be able to see many of these objects in person—a rare and exclusive opportunity as many have never been on view outside of Japan.

Highlights of the exhibition include the entry corridor where visitors follow 4-year-old Mei, a character from My Neighbor Totoro, into the Tree Tunnel gallery, a transitional space that leads into Miyazaki’s enchanted worlds; the Sky View installation, where visitors can enjoy a moment of quiet contemplation, addressing another frequent motif in Miyazaki’s films—the desire to reflect and dream; and the immersive Magical Forest with its Mother Tree installation. Standing at the threshold between dream and reality, colossal, mystical trees in many of Miyazaki’s films represent a connection or gateway to another world. In the forest, visitors will discover spirits appearing and disappearing and be able to read some of Miyazaki’s poetry.

Hayao Miyazaki was curated by the museum’s Exhibitions Curator Jessica Niebel and Assistant Curator J. Raúl Guzmán, and organized in collaboration with Japan’s Studio Ghibli, which Miyazaki co-founded in 1985.

WHEN
Exhibition closes Sunday, June 5.

The Academy Museum exhibition galleries are open seven days a week, with hours Sunday through Thursday from 10am to 6pm and Friday and Saturday from 10am to 8pm.

FILM SCREENINGS
In celebration of the final months of the exhibition Hayao Miyazaki, the Academy Museum is screening key films by the director. All will screen in the David Geffen Theater on English-subtitled 35mm prints, most newly-struck by the Academy Film Archive.

Upcoming screenings include:

  • Howl’s Moving Castle (2004) | Friday, May 13 at 7:30pm
  • Ponyo (2008) with discussion between Exhibitions Curator Jessica Niebel and Assistant Curator J. Raúl Guzmán | Friday, May 27 at 7:30pm

STORE
The Academy Museum Store carries a wide selection of merchandise inspired by Hayao Miyazaki and Studio Ghibli, including the exhibition catalogue and other items exclusive to the Academy Museum.

ADMISSION/TICKETS
Tickets to the Academy Museum are available only through advance online reservations via the Academy Museum’s website and mobile app.

General admission tickets for the museum’s exhibitions are $25 for adults, $19 for seniors (age 62+), and $15 for students. Admission for visitors ages 17 and younger, and for California residents with an EBT card is free.

Film screening tickets are $10 for adults, $7 for seniors (age 62+), and $5 for students and children (age 17-). Matinees are $5 for all. Ticket prices for Academy Museum members are $8 for adults, $6 for seniors, and $4 for students, children, and matinee-goers.


Image Credit: Mother Tree, Hayao Miyazaki, Academy Museum of Motion Pictures. Photo by Joshua White, JWPictures/© Academy Museum Foundation

Exhibition Credit: Hayao Miyazaki is presented by the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures in collaboration with Studio Ghibli. It is organized by Academy Museum of Motion Pictures Exhibitions Curator Jessica Niebel and Assistant Curator J. Raúl Guzmán. Technology solutions generously provided by Christie®. Major support comes from Arthur and Gwen Hiller, Jocelyn R. Katz, Company 3, and GKIDS. This exhibition is also supported, in part, by the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors through the Los Angeles County Department of Arts and Culture. Special thanks to the Japan Foundation for their partnership.

About the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures
The Academy Museum is the largest museum in the United States devoted to the arts, sciences, and artists of moviemaking. The museum advances the understanding, celebration, and preservation of cinema through inclusive and accessible exhibitions, screenings, programs, initiatives, and collections. Designed by Pritzker Prize-winning architect Renzo Piano, the museum’s campus contains the restored and revitalized historic Saban Building—formerly known as the May Company building (1939)—and a soaring spherical addition. Together, these buildings contain 50,000 square feet of exhibition spaces, two state-of-the-art theaters, the Shirley Temple Education Studio, and beautiful public spaces that are free and open to the public. These include: The Walt Disney Company Piazza and the Sidney Poitier Grand Lobby, which houses the Spielberg Family Gallery, Academy Museum Store, and Fanny’s restaurant and café.

In March, the Academy Museum announced the first round of exhibition rotations, which are scheduled for the 2022–2023 season. These rotations further the museum’s mission to advance the understanding, celebration, and preservation of cinema through dynamic and diverse exhibitions. More information about these rotations can be found here.

Updates at the Academy Museum.

Los Angeles, Calif. – The Academy Museum of Motion Pictures, shares an exciting Mother’s Day Gift Guide, links to the latest and greatest Academy Museum Podcast episodes, and exciting updates to the digital platforms, which include self-guided tours that take visitors outside the walls of the museum and augmented reality activations to enhance guests’ onsite experience.

THE ACADEMY MUSEUM PODCAST

Season 1: And the Oscar® Goes to…
New Episodes Out Now


Trailer – Introducing The Academy Museum Podcast, from LAist Studios

2002: This Door Has Been Opened

1999: For Your Consideration

2019: Muchas Gracias, Mexico

DIGITAL UPDATES

Hollywood Past & Present
The Academy Museum’s Inaugural Past & Present tour looks at locations associated with the Academy Awards, from the first ceremony at the Roosevelt Hotel to the Academy headquarters.

Augmented Reality
Activate the animation of pre-cinema optical toys, dissect film scenes, such as a seminal fight sequence from Bruce Lee’s Enter the Dragon (1973), and gain a clearer understanding of essential tools such as the multiplane camera.

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Academy Museum Hosts Its First-Ever Oscars Viewing Party during the 94th Academy Awards.

Los Angeles, Calif. – On March 27, 2022, on the occasion of the 94th Academy Awards®, the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures hosted the inaugural Oscars Night at the Museum. More than 1,000 guests at the sold-out event experienced some of the excitement of the awards pre-show as they walked the red carpet in their most creative and glamorous black-tie looks.

Throughout the evening attendees captured the evening in photo booths featuring a 360° slow motion camera and a photo mosaic wall; enjoyed sets from DJs Mamabear and Lady C courtesy of dublab; explored the museum’s 50,000 square feet of galleries; accepted their own award in The Oscars® Experience in the East West Bank Gallery; and had an opportunity to shop for exclusive merchandise at the Academy Museum Store.

The energy of the live broadcast was telecast in the museum’s state of the art David Geffen Theater, hosted by TCM’s Dave Karger with emcees, Chris and Vanessa Spencer, Tom Lenk, D’Lo, and Jesus Trejo performing during commercial breaks. Guests enjoyed food from Wolfgang Puck Catering in the Sidney Poitier Grand Lobby in addition to offerings from local food vendors Vurger Guyz and Thai-Mex Cocina.

Las Fotos Project, a non-profit organization that seeks to elevate the voices of teenage girls and gender-expansive youth from communities of color through photography and mentoring, helped document the festivities.

About the Academy

The Academy Museum is the largest museum in the United States devoted to the arts, sciences, and artists of moviemaking. The museum advances the understanding, celebration, and preservation of cinema through inclusive and accessible exhibitions, screenings, programs, initiatives, and collections. Designed by Pritzker Prize-winning architect Renzo Piano, the museum’s campus contains the restored and revitalized historic Saban Building—formerly known as the May Company building (1939)—and a soaring spherical addition.

Together, these buildings contain 50,000 square feet of exhibition spaces, two state-of-the-art theaters, the Shirley Temple Education Studio, and beautiful public spaces that are free and open to the public. These include: The Walt Disney Company Piazza and the Sidney Poitier Grand Lobby, which houses the Spielberg Family Gallery, Academy Museum Store, and Fanny’s restaurant and café. The Academy Museum exhibition galleries are open seven days a week, with hours Sunday through Thursday from 10am to 6pm and Friday and Saturday from 10am to 8pm.

Academy Museum of Motion Pictures Announces New ExhibitionsScheduled for the 2022-2023 Season. Hollywoodland Will Become the Museum’s First Permanent Exhibition and Will Showcase the Founding and Founders of the Film Industry in Los Angeles.

Upcoming Exhibitions Will Include Galleries Devoted to The Godfather, Agnès Varda, BOYZ N THE HOOD, Lourdes Portillo, Casablanca, the history of Black Cinema from 1898–1971, and Sarah Greenwood and Katie Spencer.

Los Angeles, March 21, 2022The Academy Museum of Motion Pictures today announced the first round of exhibition rotations, which are scheduled for the 2022–2023 season. These rotations further the museum’s mission to advance the understanding, celebration, and preservation of cinema through dynamic and diverse exhibitions.

Beginning this summer, the Academy Museum will open the expansive exhibition Regeneration: Black Cinema 1898–1971which will explore the history of Black cinema, from its earliest days to just after the civil rights movement. In the fall, the museum will open galleries devoted to Francis Ford Coppola’s The Godfather (1972) and the influences of French filmmaker Agnès Varda. In early 2023, several new exhibitions will open, including spaces dedicated to BOYZ N THE HOOD(1991), Casablanca(1942), documentarian Lourdes Portillo, and the collaborative work of production designer Sarah Greenwood and set decorator Katie Spencer.

In late spring 2023, the Academy Museum will open its first permanent exhibition,Hollywoodland , chronicling the founding and the founders of the Hollywood studio system in Los Angeles. In addition, new objects, images, and interviews will be added to numerous galleries, including Gregory Peck’s Oscar for To Kill a Mockingbird (1962), storyboards and scripts from Hitchcock’s Rebecca (1940) and The Birds (1963), costumes designed by Travis Banton, Edith Head, and Ann Roth, and interviews with film editors Maysie Hoy, Carol Littleton, and Sam Pollard, among others.

Concurrently, the Academy Museum’s public spaces—the Sidney Poitier Grand Lobby, the Ted Mann Lobby, the Netflix Lounge, the Walt Disney Company Piazza, the Dolby Family Terrace, the Gerry Schwartz and Heather Reisman Mezzanine, and the spine of the museum—will be refreshed by Kulapat Yantrasast and WHY Architecture. Incorporating cinematic elements and moments of digital engagement and connectivity, these spaces will be designed to more deeply enhance the visitor experience.

Bill Kramer, Director and President of the Academy Museum, said, “The history of film is endlessly rich and varied, which is why we envisioned the exhibitions of the Academy Museum as a continually evolving set of installations and virtual content. We are delighted to present a new round of stories, explorations, moving images, props, and other objects that explore the many facets of moviemaking – from the founding of Hollywood to present day. These rotations give our visitors many wonderful reasons to come back, while offering an extraordinary invitation to others to engage with the museum.”

Jacqueline Stewart, Chief Artistic and Programming Officer of the Academy Museum, said, “In our core exhibition, we are excited to continue offering a multitude of perspectives on film and filmmaking, drawing on the unmatched resources of our collection. These new exhibitions contrast two different versions of a ‘classic’ film with Casablanca and BOYZ N THE HOOD.  They highlight different ways in which directors can inspire others with Coppola’s landmark The Godfather and the iconoclastic Agnès Varda. And they showcase two strikingly different approaches to the filmmaking process with the fierce independence of Lourdes Portillo and the deep collaboration of Sarah Greenwood and Katie Spencer. In addition, the epic exhibitionRegeneration: Black Cinema 1898–1971 will invite visitors to explore the broad range of Black participation in filmmaking dating back to the beginning of cinema, while Hollywoodland will help visitors better understand how and why Hollywood’s studio system was created here in Los Angeles.”

Information on upcoming exhibition rotations follow below.

REGENERATION: BLACK CINEMA 1898–1971
In August, the Academy Museum will open Regeneration: Black Cinema 1898–1971 —a research-driven, in-depth look at Black participation in American filmmaking. It will highlight the work of independent Black filmmakers from the dawn of cinema to the civil rights movement. The exhibition will elevate this underrepresented aspect of artistic production and present a more inclusive story about film history. Featured artists include Lena Horne, Sidney Poitier, Paul Robeson, William Greaves, Josephine Baker, the Nicholas Brothers, Harry Belafonte, Ruby Dee and Ossie Davis, and more. The exhibitionis co-organized by Doris Berger, Vice President of Curatorial Affairs for the Academy Museum and Rhea L. Combs, Director of Curatorial Affairs at the National Portrait Gallery. Additional details will be announced soon.

HOLLYWOODLAND
Opening in late Spring 2023,Hollywoodlandwill trace the history of filmmaking in Los Angeles back to its roots at the beginning of the 20th century, illustrating how and why the city became the world capital of cinema that it still is today. This immersive gallery will convey the evolving topography of Los Angeles along the timeline of the developing movie industry, allowing visitors to feel a tangible proximity to this rich history and encouraging further exploration of the city’s landmarks upon departing the Academy Museum. The exhibition will focus on the predominantly Jewish founders of the early Hollywood studio system, delving into how their personal narratives shaped the distinct characteristics of the movies their respective studios produced. It will foreground the ways in which the birth of the American film industry—and therefore the projected depiction of the American Dream—is truly an immigrant story.  In addition to highlighting the origins of the studios commonly known as “The Majors,” the exhibition will also explore the independent producers working in Hollywood in the early 1900s. Among these studios and producers, there are high-stakes stories of ingenuity that will engage visitors and offer a deeper understanding of Hollywood history. The exhibition is organized by Associate Curator Dara Jaffe in collaboration with Associate Curator of Digital Presentations Gary Dauphin.

STORIES OF CINEMA EXHIBITION ROTATIONS
Like cinema itself, thegalleries of the museum’s core exhibition Stories of Cinema will evolve and change over time to highlight different movies, artists, eras, genres, and more. Following are new rotations that will be presented in the 2022–2023 season in Stories of Cinema.

The Art of Moviemaking: The Godfather,will open on November 3, 2022 and will showcase the collaborative process of the making of this masterpiece through a wide array of original objects, images, and stories. In 1972, director Francis Ford Coppola’s interpretation of Mario Puzo’s popular novel provided an operatic and poignant reflection on the American Dream that not only radically transformed the moviegoing experience, but also the moviemaking process. Featured costumes, props, scripts, and equipment will highlight the contributions of each cinematic branch, exploring how they innovated amidst the limitations and freedoms of “New Hollywood.” Object highlights include Don Corleone’s desk and chair used in The GodfatherTrilogy, Coppola’s original “Godfather notebook,” and a costume worn by Al Pacino in The Godfather Part II. This exhibition is organized by Assistant Curator Sophia Serrano. Leading up to The Godfather gallery rotation, the Academy Museum Store will be releasing an exclusive limited-edition The Godfather LP in partnership with Amoeba Records. The album will feature music from The City of Prague Philharmonic Orchestra and will include music from the trilogy. Pre-order your copy today at academymuseumstore.org.

Also opening on November 3 is Director’s Inspiration: Agnès Varda. Rather than drawing inspiration from other filmmakers or films, Varda was influenced by her life, experiences, and the world around her. As a result, her work is undeniably personal. This gallery will highlight her influences and films from her six-decade long career ranging from La Pointe Courte (1955) to Varda by Agnès (2019). A photographer prior to becoming a filmmaker, the gallery will explore Varda’s time behind the still camera including prints, contact sheets, and photography related production materials. From her years living in Los Angeles to her familial relationships, the autobiographical elements that permeate all aspects of Varda’s filmography will be represented using personal postcards, props, family photographs, and other production materials. Additionally, Varda’s career as a fine artist and her longstanding love of art history which influenced many of her films will be explored using production notebooks, posters, and a model for one of her cinema shack installations. This exhibition is organized by Vice President of Curatorial Affairs Doris Berger and Assistant Curator Ana Santiago.

In February 2023, the Significant Movies and Moviemakersgallery will reopen with a four-gallery experience that will showcase the classic drama Casablanca(1942), the groundbreaking film BOYZ N THE HOOD (1991), the collaboration between production designer Sarah Greenwood and set decorator Katie Spencer, and documentarian Lourdes Portillo .

The museum’s celebration of Casablancawill feature original production objects highlighting beloved characters, settings, music, and the cinematic virtuosity that made the 1942 film one of Hollywood’s most enduring classics. The gallery will explore the influx of European émigrés who contributed their talents both in front of and behind the camera, echoing the narrative themes of the film itself. Though Casablanca is a timeless piece of cinema in its romance and artistry, it is also meaningfully and inextricably tied to the context of its war-time production during a refugee crisis—a context this gallery will seek to illustrate. This exhibition is organized by Associate Curator Dara Jaffe.

The BOYZ N THE HOODgallery will explore the 1991 movie’s groundbreaking depiction of Black life in South Los Angeles, as well as its lasting impact in popular culture. The space will highlight writer-director John Singleton’s unique vision for the film, for which he became both the first African American and the youngest person ever to be nominated for the Academy Award® for Best Director. This gallery will also spotlight the larger cast and crew, including Cuba Gooding Jr., Ice Cube, Morris Chestnut, Laurence Fishburne, Nia Long, and Angela Bassett, and show the pivotal role the film played, not only in their careers, but also in ushering in a new generation of Black talent in Hollywood. This gallery is organized by Research Assistants Esme Douglas and Manouchka Kelly Labouba.

Longtime collaboratorsproduction designer Sarah Greenwood and set decorator Katie Spencer have translated a diverse array of periods and locations to screen. From bringing to life Leo Tolstoy’s famous novel in Anna Karenina (2012), to depicting Winston Churchill’s war room in Darkest Hour (2017), this gallery will spotlight Greenwood and Spencer’s collaboration and give a glimpse into their design process. Objects such as research materials, production design drawings, and a set model will be featured in the gallery, organized by Ana Santiago.

A gallery devoted to Lourdes Portillowillhighlight the life and career of this vital documentarian, visual artist, journalist, and activist. Born in Chihuahua, Mexico and raised in Los Angeles, Portillo’s documentaries blend experimental and traditional modes of storytelling to forefront issues of identity and social justice in the US and Latin America. This gallery focuses on key projects including Las Madres: The Mothers of Plaza de Mayo (1985), La Ofrenda: The Days of the Dead (1988), The Devil Never Sleeps (1994), and Señorita Extraviada/Missing Young Woman (2001). This gallery is organized by Sophia Serrano.

STORIES OF CINEMA NEW COLLECTION ROTATIONS
Also during the 2022-2023 season, new objects and media selected from the vast collection of the Academy, as well as loans from private collections, will go on view throughout the Stories of Cinema galleries.

This spring, the Inventing Worlds and Characters galleries that are dedicated to animation and effects will feature: new works highlighting the independent animation of John and Faith Hubley including character animation, cel setup, and backgrounds from Moonbird (1959) and Cockaboody (1974); new cels from Katsuhiro Otomo’s Akira (1988); concept drawings by Ray Harryhausen for Jason and the Argonauts (1963); and concept drawings by Georges Méliès for The Conquest of the Pole (À la conquête du pôle, 1912).

In November, the Identity gallery will feature costumes worn by Elizabeth Taylor in A Place in the Sun (1951) designed by Edith Head; Olivia Coleman as Queen Anne in The Favourite (2018), designed by Sandy Powell; Tilda Swinton as Madame Blanc in Suspiria (2018) designed by Giulia Piersanti; and Richard Pryor as Charlie Snow in The Bingo Long Traveling All-Stars and Motor Kings (1973), designed by Bernard Johnson. The gallery will highlight renowned make-up artist Ken Diaz and legendary costume designer Ann Roth through in-depth case studies of their work.

In spring 2023, new additions to the gallery will include costumes worn by Anna May Wong as Tu Tuan in Limehouse Blues (1934), designed by Travis Banton; Carmen Miranda as Rosita Rivas in Weekend in Havana (1941), designed by Gwen Wakeling; Humphrey Bogart as Philip Marlowe in The Big Sleep (1946), designed by Leah Rhodes; Joan Crawford in Mildred Pierce (1946), designed by Milo Anderson; and Marlon Brando as Fletcher Christian in Mutiny on the Bounty (1962), designed by Moss Mabry.

In November, the Academy Awards History gallery will showcase Gregory Peck’s Oscar for To Kill a Mockingbird (1962), the Elie Saab gown worn by Halle Berry to the 74th Academy Awards in 2002, the tuxedo worn by Francis Ford Coppola to the 45th Academy Awards in 1973, and the Swarovski-studded vegan leather jacket worn by costume designer Jenny Beavan to the 88th Academy Awards in 2016.

In November, the Story gallery, dedicated to showcasing the creation and development of story in cinema, will highlight case studies on Hitchcock’s adaptations of Daphne du Maurier’s writing: Rebecca (1940) and The Birds (1963). The Rebecca study will look at the role producer David O. Selznick played in bringing the film to the screen, as well as the importance of Kay Brown, Selznick’s East Coast Story Editor, and writer Joan Harrison. The Birds installation will focus on Evan Hunter’s script and Harold Michelson’s storyboards of the now iconic sequence outside the schoolhouse.

Additional new objects from films spanning the silent era to the present day include script pages from Stella Dallas (1925), written by Frances Marion; script pages from Adam’s Rib (1949), written by Ruth Gordon and Garson Kanin; notebooks and script pages for Mosquita y Mari (2012), written and directed by Aurora Guerrero; and script notes and script pages from Queen and Slim (2019), written by Lena Waithe.  

In spring 2023, the Image gallery—which already includes vital interviews and the works of many cinematographers, production designers, and set decorators—will be expanded to include conversations with film editors Carol Littleton, Maysie Hoy, and Sam Pollard. These important interviews are from the Academy Oral History Collection.

Visiting the Academy Museum
Tickets to the Academy Museum are available only through advance online reservations via the Academy Museum’s website and mobile app. General admission tickets for the museum’s exhibitions are $25 for adults, $19 for seniors (age 62+), and $15 for students. Admission for visitors ages 17 and younger, and for California residents with an EBT, card is free.


Images: (top left): The Nicholas Brothers in a scene from Stormy Weather (1943), Fayard Nicholas, left, and Harold Nicholas, photographic print, gelatin silver. Courtesy Margaret Herrick Library, © Twentieth Century Fox; (top center): The Godfather (1972), film still, courtesy of Paramount Pictures; (top right) Humphrey Bogart and Ingrid Bergman during production of Casablanca (1942), Warner Bros., Image courtesy Margaret Herrick Library; (bottom left): Agnés Varda on the set of Lon Bonheur, ©1964 ciné-tamaris, photo by Marilou Parolini; (bottom center left): BOYZ N THE HOOD (1991) film still, Sony Pictures Entertainment; (bottom center right): Carl Laemmle, undated, Courtesy Margaret Herrick Library; (bottom right): Lourdes Portillo, Courtesy International Documentary Association

CreditStories of Cinema is organized by Academy Museum of Motion Pictures Director and President Bill Kramer, Senior Director of Curatorial Affairs Doris Berger, Exhibitions Curator Jenny He, and Assistant Curators J. Raúl Guzmán, Dara Jaffe, Ana Santiago, and Sophia Serrano, with support from Research Assistants Esme Douglas and Manouchka Kelly Labouba, the Academy Museum Inclusion Advisory Committee, and the Academy Branch Task Forces. The exhibition is presented by PWC. Major funding is provided by Gerald Schwartz and Heather Reisman. Generous support provided by Metro Goldwyn Mayer, Ruderman Family Foundation, FotoKem, Barbara Roisman Cooper and Martin M. Cooper, Jocelyn R. Katz, John Ptak and Margaret Black, Lauren Shuler Donner, Randy E. Haberkamp, Kevin McCormick and A. Scott Berg, and John and Lacey Williams. Technology solutions are generously provided by Panasonic and Sony Electronics Inc. Stories of Cinema is powered by Dolby, and Dolby is the exclusive audio partner for the Composer gallery. Academy Museum digital engagement platform sponsored by Bloomberg Philanthropies.

Regeneration: Black Cinema 1898–1971 is the recipient of the 2018 Sotheby’s Prize. The Sotheby’s Prize was founded to support and encourage museums to break new ground by recognizing curatorial excellence and facilitating an upcoming exhibition that explores overlooked or underrepresented art history. The Sotheby’s Prize was awarded by a jury of museum curators and directors comprising Sir Nicholas Serota, Donna De Salvo, Okwui Enwezor, Connie Butler, Emilie Gordenker, and chaired by Allan Schwartzman. Regeneration  is also made possible in part by major grants from the National Endowment for the Humanities. The exhibition is supported by grants from the National Endowment for the Arts and from the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors through the Los Angeles County Department of Arts and Culture. Academy Film Archive restorations are funded in part by grants from the National Endowment for the Arts and the Capital Group Companies Charitable Foundation.

About the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures 
The Academy Museum is the largest museum in the United States devoted to the arts, sciences, and artists of moviemaking. The museum advances the understanding, celebration, and preservation of cinema through inclusive and accessible exhibitions, screenings, programs, initiatives, and collections. Designed by Pritzker Prize-winning architect Renzo Piano, the museum’s campus contains the restored and revitalized historic Saban Building—formerly known as the May Company building (1939)—and a soaring spherical addition. Together, these buildings contain 50,000 square feet of exhibition spaces, two state-of-the-art theaters, the Shirley Temple Education Studio, and beautiful public spaces that are free and open to the public. These include: The Walt Disney Company Piazza and the Sidney Poitier Grand Lobby, which houses the Spielberg Family Gallery, Academy Museum Store, and Fanny’s restaurant and café. The Academy Museum exhibition galleries are open seven days a week, with hours Sunday through Thursday from 10am to 6pm and Friday and Saturday from 10am to 8pm.